Recruited Athlete Question

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by DevilDog, Aug 6, 2009.

  1. DevilDog

    DevilDog Member

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    How does the process differ from the normal route? When are the offers given out? How much room do the coaches have qualification wise to bring an athlete in?
    Do they get treated different once they are at the Academy? Does anyone here have experience as a recruited athlete that can give 1st hand accounts?
     
  2. cadetmom100

    cadetmom100 Member

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    My son is a recruitted athlete. He received his "offer" during the spring of his junior year, and made his committment the following fall. To the best of my recollection, the only thing the coaches were able to offer in terms of admission is an appointment outside of the normal process from your Congressional delegation. The grades, test scores, etc all had to meet the "regular" entrance standards - there is really no wiggle room in this area. Once they get to the Academy, the team offers lots of moral support, good advise etc. When the team travels you miss class, and there are a few times when athletics conflicts with military training, (but these are limited) and athletes are expected to make up all work, and keep pace with the class. The schedule is a challenge!
     
  3. PDub

    PDub Prospective

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    I'm not an IC, but from what I've heard, cadet life for an athlete can be very stressful. And it doesn't help, either, when some of the classmates get short tempered because the IC missed training sessions. ICs just have to do their best to show that they are making a genuine effort to help the squadron.
     
  4. meadowlark

    meadowlark Member

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    According to my son's ALO he was a "blue chip" recruit. I believe that designation helped with his acceptance from a GPA point of view. His coaches did "babysit" his application. Could he have made it in with out the athletics? it would have been close, he had a 35 ACT. His GPA was low due to sports commitments, so I think there is a little "wiggle room". He does say being an IC, a cadet, and a student is overwhelming, there are just not enough hours in the day. However his teammates are what keeps him going. He is loving the sports side of the Academy.
     
  5. bigcox

    bigcox USAFA Cadet

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    so far, being an IC is great. managing your time is the biggest issue. juggling school, military life, and being an athlete overwhelms alot of people. most importantly, do a sport because you love it. doing a sport and being miserable about it will make you want to drop out of the academy that much faster because you can't get anything done. you get the afternoons off, well at least in my case, and sometimes you have excused weekends from some required military training that you would otherwise do normally. being an IC really depends on the person. can you multi-task to fit everything in your schedule? you need to as an IC.
     
  6. texas flier

    texas flier New Member

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    I would say that athletes do have some wiggle room with regards to acceptance. My son, who is currently a cadet, had to meet some criteria but he certainly would not have made the cut based on his academics alone. This is where the prep school comes into play. Either way, sooner or later, athletes who do gain acceptance via athletics will have to prove they can handle the classroom. There are no basketweaving classes available.
     
  7. PDub

    PDub Prospective

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    Yesterday during morning minutes upperclassmen dropped us for pushups, and an IC didn't do pushups, excuse being an IC. Upperclassmen told him he was being way too cocky, and boy were they mad!
     
  8. texas flier

    texas flier New Member

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    Wow, he actually got out of pushups? I wonder how that works. If you are an IC athlete in season, or for any season? I guess what I'm saying is I don't see how doing pushups is going to impact a baseball player who is months away from competition.
     
  9. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    First time I've ever heard of that.

    Cadets online here...is this "normal?"

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  10. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    The normal answer to "Sir, I don't have to because I'm an IC" would be more along the lines of
    ON YOUR FACE! 1-2-3-ONE, SIR!...
    ...
    ...
    ...
    1--------2-------3-TWENTY TEN, SIR!

    Our training officer might be tempted to do 3,000 flutter kicks (again).
     
  11. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    I have seen this happen in my squad. They are technically allowed to do that. Another part of that TZO gap that irritates many.
     
  12. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    This is one of those fine line areas. Technically; the IC's can get out of the disciplinary (Lack of a better word) pushups and such physical activities. Reality: Most IC's won't try and get out of it. They'd just do it. I've spoken with way too many IC's. While they do realize that their practices, games, and training do in fact get them out of certain duties and formations; the vast majority do in fact WANT to be part of their squadron's/flight's "Team" concept. Remember; these are individuals who have been living in serious 'Team" environment for most of their life. They understand; maybe better than some; the benefits of being part of the "team" (Meaning their flight/squadron); and the negatives of not participating. The athletes normally find the right balance where they can do their sport; maintain grades; participate with their flight/squadron with the numerous activities; etc... And they usually gain the respect of their flight/squadron. But this is definitely an "individual" thing. Some athletes will abuse the intent of some of these rules. They will isolate themselves from the rest of their flight and squadron. And it's not normally the "star" players with the name on campus that are trying to get out of anything. Most will be there, with the flight/squadron, doing whatever they do, unless they are required to be some place else. Again, no matter what the rules may say, it's more an individual issue with IC's. Some don't try and get out of anything. Some will use it to their advantage.
     
  13. PDub

    PDub Prospective

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    No, he didn't get out of pushups. After upperclassmen realized he didn't do first set of pushups they made him drop (by himself, w/ rest of flight watching) and do even more pushups for "having attitude problems". But honestly, with him being an IC, we NEVER see him in the squad after Basic. He leaves early in the morning for morning practice, and comes back late (around ACQ), and misses all the, uh, fun, that we get for being in the squadron. Going to the libary is nice, though - you're allowed to stay until 2230, I believe.
     

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