Recruited Athletes

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by OhioWrestler, Apr 6, 2009.

  1. OhioWrestler

    OhioWrestler Member

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    If a recruited athlete meets all the requirements (ie, CFA, test scores, GPA, EC's, etc) but fails to get a nomination does that end that applicant's admission process? Or is there exta consideration or nominations not used that are available??

    thanks
     
  2. HuskiesMama

    HuskiesMama Member

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    No nomination = no admission.
     
  3. Gcokeley

    Gcokeley Cadet

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    Most recruited athletes probably go to NAPS anyway so you dont need a nomination. Its the USNAs way of redshirting you. I know this is the case for most wrestlers.
     
  4. OhioWrestler

    OhioWrestler Member

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    Recruited Athlete

    So athletes who attend NAPS do not need a congressional nomination????
     
  5. Cycling1222

    Cycling1222 Member

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    Im sorry i cant be of help in ur nomination question but im presenting a question of my own, so any body that can help, please do!

    I'm not technically a recruited athlete because cycling is not an NCAA sport (yet!), but there are intercollegiate confrences all over the country which are extremly competative. This being said, the coach of the naval academy cycling team wrote me an "endorsment" to the dean of admissions saying we want this kid blah blah......

    So my question is, is this really going to help me? or does this happen all the time and its no big deal?

    thanks!
     
  6. xchefmike

    xchefmike Member

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    Ohio check your messages

    I left you a message
     
  7. NorthernCalMother

    NorthernCalMother Member

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    No nomination needed to attend NAPS. Once there, NAPSters apply for a nomination for the next USNA class. If a NAPSter doesn't receive a MOC nom, s/he may receive one from the Secretary of the Navy.
     
  8. OhioWrestler

    OhioWrestler Member

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    I emailed you back.

    thanks!!
     
  9. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Let me clarify this a bit. You must have a nom for an appointment. However, there are sources of noms to whom you can't apply. These include SecNav and the Supe. These sources are used for a variety of candidates (not all of them recruited athletes) whom USNA wants but, for some reason, were unable to secure a nom on their own. It happened with one of my candidates who was not a recruited athlete and has gone on to do exceptionally well at USNA.

    Also, it is really inappropriate to characterize NAPS as red-shirting. This topic has aired before but it's worth repeating. The primary purpose of NAPS (which is supported by taxpayers) is to prepare enlisted men and women to transition academically and otherwise to USNA. Secondarily, it provides additional academic preparation to other students whom USNA feels would be great midshipmen and officers but need some additional academic help.

    Some of these "others" are recruited athletes but certainly not all. A number of years ago, the USAFA got "into trouble" with the Secretary of the Air Force for essentially red-shirting its football team at the USAFA equivalent of NAPS. As a result, I'd expect that all SAs would be senstive to this issue.

    Foundation schools (which are privately supported and where parents are expected to make a financial contribution in line with their ability to pay) are often heavily populated with recruited athletes. However, realize that the funding to support these students is private, not the US taxpayer.
     
  10. xchefmike

    xchefmike Member

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    Ask Army who's previous coach as late as last year said in interviews how he was sending players to MAPS. "for a redshirt year"

    This is a highly sensitive subject. It is not uncommon for a athlete who is highly intelligent to be lacking in some of the higher math and other subjects as it is difficult to sometimes schedule the ardous requirements in HS football and High phase learning (college level classwork) as in some institutions the schedule just plain conflicts. We were lucky that S was able to attend community college and HS and play in 2 varsity sports, however we know individuals that the AP classes were not available as they conflicted in the daypart that overlaps with practice or lifting or phys therapy. A students that were not able to attend AP or Community college. They were left with a lack of necessary skills to compete in a SA environment.
     
  11. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    ^^^^

    Coaches may call it red-shirting but the purpose, in my view, is very different for SAs than for most schools. Generally, red-shirting is done at civilian schools to allow kids to get bigger, stronger, more experienced, etc. without the year counting against their four years of eligibility. It's typically not done to help the athlete prepare academically for the rigors of college b/c, let's face it, most (not all) big-time college football players are not taking a difficult academic schedule.

    However, for SAs, if a student is fully qualifiied, including academically, to attend a SA, I think it would be very hard -- if not impossible -- to send that student to NAPs simply to give him another year of football experience. Plus which, I don't believe that the football practices at NAPs and the other SA schools would be equivalent to a red-shirt year -- it's not as if they're regularly playing with the SA varsity team. So, there may be a high percentage of athletes at NAPS, but I think that's b/c there is a high percentage who, for various reasons, need additional academic help.

    I think USNA would have a VERY hard time justifying to the Board of Visitors, Congress, and others, that students who are fully qualified to attend USNA are sent to NAPS for a year at taxpayer expense to make them better football players. And I would say the same is true for Army. My guess is the Army coach used "red-shirting" colloquially, but then again, I'm not him and I wasn't there.:rolleyes:
     

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