Registering to Vote

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by USMA2016, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. USMA2016

    USMA2016 Appointee - Class of 2016

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    Dear SAF,

    I've been thinking... the 2012 presidential election will be during the class of 2016's plebe year. Do we register to vote in New York or our state prior to USMA?
     
  2. USMA2016

    USMA2016 Appointee - Class of 2016

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    I don't like to bump my own thread... but no one responded and I feel like it's an important question that might get lost on here if no one responds...
     
  3. cisco

    cisco Member

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    New York.
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I disagree - you can register in NY, but not as a NY resident. I am reasonbly sure you can register via mail to vote in CA election via absentee ballots.


    AND according to NY Stare Board of Election

    https://vhd.overseasvotefoundation....york&_a=viewarticle&kbarticleid=2036&nav=0,50

    For military and civilian voters alike:

    No, you cannot simply choose a state/county where you would like to vote and register there.

    You must vote in the state/county where you last established residence (domicile) in the U.S., and typically, where you developed a real connection.

    Under traditional rules and state law, a person is permitted to register and vote only in the place that constitutes his/her previous residence/domicile. This is the last real home you had in the US and is referred to by election officials as your voting residence address. That defines the state and the jurisdiction. If you are serving in the military you should use your Address of Domicile.

    You do not need to own property or to be currently living at that address, or sending mail there. It is your last/former address in the U.S., not that of a relative still there. It also doesn't matter how long you have been away, if you are eligible, you can still vote.
     
  5. kdc246

    kdc246 Member

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    From California. Daughter at USAFA in Colorado. She registered to vote in California and votes via absentee ballot. Ballot sometimes comes to the house, we just put it in a bigger envelope and send it on to her. Very simple this way.
     
  6. USMA2016

    USMA2016 Appointee - Class of 2016

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    Okay, interesting. I'm wanting to vote in the California elections for a few reasons:

    1. Having lived in San Diego for 18 years I'd like a say in the upcoming mayoral elections.
    2. As a third-party voter (I won't say in an effort to not get political) I won't have too much of an impact in either NY or CA
    3. California usually has interesting ballot measures and referenda :rolleyes:
    4. I'm proud to be a Californian! (and even better... a southern californian! SoCal fo lyfe)

    So you think it would be possible to register to vote in the CA elections and vote absentee?
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Absolutely. That's what I did while in college. Not sure you can register via mail though. Check with your local Board of Elections.
     
  8. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

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    I imagine you need to register (NOW if you are 18) either at your local Board of Elections or one of their approved alternate site/events (sometimes public library). It should be on their website or available by a quick phone call. It is very easy to vote by absentee ballot. I was able to fill out the information for my cadet in early October and he received the ballot and voted. I do seem to remember that someone (roommate) had to witness his signature, but it was uninvolved. The ballot folded into an envelope and all he needed was a stamp. (Your mileage may vary.)

    The right to vote is very precious---never shirk your duty or take it lightly. I am always stunned to find out that there are adults in their 40's and 50's who have never voted. Shame on them.
     
  9. mtnman17

    mtnman17 USMA Appointee 2015

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    If you're 18 now, follow that advice and go register soon. If you're 17 (me last year) go downtown to the BOE and tell them you want to register anyways. If San Diego is anything like our BOE back home it shouldn't be an issue. They put my stuff on file and automatically processed it on my 18th birthday, which for me happened here at USMA. Then they send me an email before an election and ask if I want an absentee ballot sent to me. It's cake.
     

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