Restrepo Director Killed in Libya

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by HMQ, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. HMQ

    HMQ Member

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  2. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Not to try and sound cold blooded, but they were there voluntarily to make money. "That's why the media/entertainment industry does what they do; to make money". They took a risk going into such an area. I'd feel bad if it was red cross workers, UN peace keepers, military, or anyone trying to provide aid/assistance. But I can't feel too bad for a person who was there filming and taking pictures so they could make money. Just not in me.
     
  3. HMQ

    HMQ Member

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    I believe they had a higher purpose than making money. The film Restrepo is a very serious effort to show the reality of war for our combat forces, focusing on the fight in the Korangal Valley of Afghanistan. These film makers - as well as reporters on the battlefronts - put themselves in serious harms way to tell these important stories.
     
  4. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Wow. Just Wow. [deleted] I am disgusted.
    What if there were no photojournalists in WWII to record the Holocaust? The world would still be indenial that the horror of horrors actually happened.


    What a tragedy. It is dangerous work these days being a photographer or journalist in a war zone. Thank goodness there are people who are willing to do it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2011
  5. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Sorry; but I don't consider them photo-journalists. What you call the photo-journalist since the "embedded reporter", is not the same as vietnam and prior. If you believe they are strictly there to report the truth and facts, have at it. I don't like seeing anyone die for any reason. I just don't happen to see them in the same light as you do. I don't see today's media and entertainment industry the same way I did years/decades ago. Today, it's about sensationalism, ratings, awards, and money. You have you're opinion and I have mine.

    And you can be as "Disgusted" as you want. You might be "Just_A_Mom", but guess what????......you're NOT MY MOM!!! [edited as prior post was edited]
     
  6. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    There weren't any photojournalists during WWII that recorded the "Holocaust". It was only recorded and documented after the war was over. The world knew it was happening from Kristallnacht through 1944 but denied it "US Included". And these new "news" guys are in the business of making money or a reputation. Re: Dan Rather "Gunga Dan".
     
  7. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    His death is just as tragic as any other death; however, I can understand Christcorp's sentiment here although I don't necessarily agree with it. This death will probably get more coverage in the news than almost any of the recent deaths in Afghanistan/Iraq.

    Weren't most of the photographs/video from those wars created by active duty photojournalists?

    Agree that it is a tragedy, but is it anymore a tragedy than a news reporter who gets killed while covering a story in the US?
     
  8. Packer

    Packer Member

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    I feel as does Christcorp does on this. In my opinion the journalist was there for shallow reasons (money, fame, etc). Unfortunately his death will receive far more attention than our fallen military men and women.
     
  9. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Well I suppose that's one perspective. I however feel that the work that they were doing was dangerous and valuable and that most soldiers feel so too. The film Restrepo and the book War by Hetherington and Sebastien Junger brought a lot of needed understanding of what warriors in Afghanistan are going thru (Occupying a COP and patrolling the Korengal, Kandahar,Helmand,Paktika, Nuristan and Kunar provinces are not the same as sitting on Bagram Airfield by a long shot). They spent over 7 months with that one lonely platoon out on COP Restrepo- not sitting in the BK at BAF. Hetherington and Junger are pretty much the modern equivalent of Ernie Pyle in WW2 or Joe Galloway in Vietnam. Hetherington's death is a loss for the military as well as for the journalism world. They brought visibility of the tragedies of the world to the outside- which is the only thing that actually causes the outside world to care. Bravery comes in uniform and out of it- all military people aren't hero's nor is bravery and selflessness restricted to those in uniform. It's unworthy to suggest otherwise. Anyone who suggests that they are out for just shallow personal fame has clearly never read either this book or seen the documentary.
    BTW a little background on Hetherington:
    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  10. HMQ

    HMQ Member

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    The irony here is that Hetherington and other journalists who risk their lives in war zones are putting themselves at risk PRECISELY TO BRING ATTENTION to our military men and women in harm's way. Have you seen Restrepo?

    If it weren't for these intrepid journalists and documentarians, there would be far less known to the public-at-large about the realities faced by our combat troops. That's not to say that they are more heroic than those fighting - there is no contest here. But they are doing important and worthwhile work, and putting themselve in dangerous situations to do so. I think they deserve credit for that.
     
  11. HMQ

    HMQ Member

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    Thanks Bruno - I wish I could have expressed myself as well!
     
  12. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    I've already said that I have sorrow for any death. But while your point is well meaning, the question begs to be asked:

    "If the money, fame, notoriety, etc... wasn't part of their going to these places....... WOULD THEY?"

    Our military members, red-cross, volunteers, etc... don't go into such dangerous places because the "Pay is good". They do what they do because they have made a commitment to their country. War, unfortunately, has been this director's niche. If somehow Michael Moore could find a way to turn war into "Gun Control", and he could make money, I'm sure he'd be there too.

    USO entertainers volunteer to go visit our troops. When a reporter, director, news team, etc... tells the DOD that they want to go into a hostile area "PRO BONO" and provide the DOD with news feeds and information to help the effort; then I'll have a totally different opinion.
     
  13. America's Finest

    America's Finest USMA Cadet

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    Should a soldier offer to deploy without pay in order to be worthy in your eyes? Or maybe just turn down hazard pay and reenlistment bonuses? Althought many people join to serve, I am fairly certain a good portion of them would not do it without pay.

    Everyone has to make a living. There's nothing shameful about that.
     
  14. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    [edited]

    Bruno - you are a beacon of light shinning though the mud on this thread. Thanks for your thoughtful and insightful contributions.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2011
  15. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    A soldier knows their pay "Prior" to any engagement. Some can go an entire career and never once have to set foot into harms way. Others are tasked numerous times. But it's "Part of the Job". They knew that when they got into this line of work. This director and his film crew were not forced to go to these places. They chose to. And the reason they chose to, was because of the money. Granted, it's not Transformers or similar, but it made a lot more money than any soldier does that I know.

    The bottom line is some here believe these individuals died "Serving their country". I don't. And KP2001 is correct that their death will over shadow any military member's death.
     
  16. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    A few blurbs from a Wall Street Journal interview with Junger and Hetherington last June 25th about the making of the Documentary Restrepo. This was a good man- a good team and they did a lot to actually publicize what the real soldiers are doing in Afghanistan. Those of you who think that the USO entertainers who fly in and sing to the soldiers and Airmen etc..do more are obviously entitled to your opinion, but the war is fought out in the boonies and that's where these two did their work. Ask the 173rd Abn what they thought of the documentary. These guys put their asses out on the line physically and financially to make a documentary about real soldiers in the real war and wound up documenting the life of an Airborne Infantry company (2d Plt B/2-503 Abn Inf) in which an MoH was awarded. Going out there for that amount of time seems to me to speak volumes about them as well as bring recognition to those soldiers and marines who are doing the brunt of the fighting in Afghanistan. It sure as heck doesn't sound like guys off on a personal glory trip- especially since you don't see either of them in the movie or the book :the stars are the soldiers living, fighting, dying on that OP. I don't think we should begrudge giving credit, honor and sympathy to men who deserve it- in uniform or out.
    From the WSJ June 25th 2010:
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  17. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Folks before we have any fratricide in this thread- It's ok to disagree with each other- but let's try not to insult each other ok? It doesn't add to the thread, won't convert those with whom you disagree and probably will bring you or the thread into danger of being closed, editied or disciplined, none of which is pleasant or necessary if we conduct the thread in a responsible and respectful manner.
     
  18. WAMom68

    WAMom68 Founding Member

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    I just exchanged emails with my son at USMA about this. I knew he had met Junger and Hetherington last fall when they were at USMA to speak to the Comm's reading group. The Comm had the cadets read "War" and then they gathered to discuss the book as well as hear the authors speak about it. My son's words about this journalist death: "That sucks...he seemed like a nice guy and one of the non-chicken **** journalists out there."
     
  19. LOVEARMY

    LOVEARMY Member

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    Cant believe the comment

    I really do not think Tim Hetherington was a rich man. What is rich? How much do you think he earned a year? How much was his life worth? Do you think all that money he made is going to make his family feel any better when they bury him? I do not think he had been living a lavish lifestyle in Libya spending all that cash he has made . I do not think he put himself in harms way to "make money". He put himself in harms way to tell a story. A story that he believed that had to be told. Some people may not like the story, that life. No one should ever have to die at the hands of another human being ever. Tim Hetherington was killed by very bad people. They were evil. He did not deserve to die.

    This forum is visited everyday by young men and women who want to protect others from the evil in this world. Those young men and women will someday put there lives on the line to protect the world from evil. Those same young men and women aren't going to put their life on the line for money. They are going to put their life on the line because they believe in what is good and right. Tim Hetherington may not have been a member of the armed forces but he thought by telling his story he was doing what was good and right. When I watched Restrepo it reminded me of all the young men and women that are fighting for me. Yes, I thought ..me. My heart ached when saw how in danger the soldiers were and I was just sitting at home in my comfortable home. Restrepo made me think, it made me think as all Americans should think and how thankful they should be that these young Americans are fighting evil to protect our way of life.. If Tim Hetherington just made a small percent of Americans and others in the world finally see and understand the sacrifice the members of U.S. armed forces make everyday so we can live in a free country than we should mourn him.
     
  20. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Just to show that this is not the only forum having this debate and that there are people on both sides of the argument I have copied the below two posts from another site I frequent:

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    kleppe 2011-04-20 04:40:43 PM
    A year and two days ago, 23 year old Staff Sergeant James R. Patton was killed when his helicopter crashed during combat operations in Iraq. He was the great-great-nephew of General George Patton and was on his seventh deployment (having previously deployed twice to Iraq and four times to Afghanistan). He left behind a wife and infant daughter. The United States military has been at war for nearly ten years and has pulled it off without a draft. It has done it by taking soldiers like Jimmy and sending them on seven six+ month deployments by the time they're 23. But who does the media cry about? Some dipshiat civilian who got blown up trying to make a buck off of human suffering.

    Call me a troll if you want but I will never shed a tear for war journalists. They do not contribute to the mission and in almost every case they are a detriment. Whenever I hear war correspondent I imagine Geraldo Rivera drawing the outline for a mission in front of millions of viewers.

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    rangerdavid 2011-04-20 04:40:53 PM
    The "He gets what he deserves for being a war zone" comments make me throw up in my mouth, you insensitive, ignorant trolls. Without brave people like this, you'd just "know" what the government tells you. Go back to your holes.
     

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