ROTC Advice

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Ozzie3o5, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Ozzie3o5

    Ozzie3o5 New Member

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    Hello, My name is Osvaldo Fernandez. I'm a sophomore at Florida international university, although credit-wise i'm a junior. I'm a mechanical engineering major, and will graduate with a certificate in aeronautical engineering and hopefully a certificate in materials engineering. I have a 3.2 GPA, which will continue to rise. I've already taken Calc 1, 2, and 3. I've taken physics 1 w/ calc 1 and i'm currently taking physics 2 w/ calc 2. (passing should be no problem). My ultimate career goal is to work for Lockheed Martin, but i want the military to be a chapter in my life. (i have my reasons, as does everyone else) My question is which branch of ROTC should i join, if any, where i can put my skills to use. Being a sophomore/junior am i eligible for any financial aid?Or should i just wait until i graduate and attempt to go to OCS/OTS? FIU has Army ROTC if that matters. I have been contemplating this for a very long time, i dont want to make an impulsive move which i'll regret in the long run. I've searched the internet for these answer but i continuously find contradicting information. Thank you all for your time, and for your help-full opinions.
     
  2. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    I think your first stop should be at the ROTC office on campus. They will have the specific answers with regards to your eligibility to participate in ROTC during your remaining years at FIU.

    As to which branch, that answer depends upon what you think will benefit you with your longer term career goal. You don't necessarily have to fly to work in aerospace, but it certainly doesn't hurt. Bullet may be able to give you more thoughts on that matter.

    Generally, flying aside, all branches will give you the leadership training necessary to be successful in corporate America. Remember, as an officer, you will be leading people and managing assets - not always a hands on experience unless you doing something like flying. Those are the most transferrable assets. Lockheed-Martin looks for that first. All other skills are just about what entry point into the system you take.

    And BTW, how is your physical fitness level? All branches have an expectation of cadets who are solid in their physical capabilities.
     
  3. goldenlion

    goldenlion Member

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    You just missed the deadline for the Coast Guard's COLLEGE STUDENT PRE-COMMISSIONING INITIATIVE (SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM). The deadline was January 17th. Since you attend a Hispanic Serving Institution, you may have qualified.
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    The other reason companies like Lockheed, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney look at military 1st is because many of the projects require a Top Secret Security Clearance. A TS costs thousands of dollars, takes months to complete and are valid for 5 yrs.

    Military members not only understand the needs of the AD members in "real" life experience, but they also have that TS. They can start working minute one upon being hired. The non-military applicant/employee may be forced to wait up to 6 months before they can do anything requiring a clearance. Plus, these companies must pay for it out of their pocket to get them this TS, a cost they would prefer not to pay if given an option.

    As other stated you should investigate each branch because your commitment varies branch to branch, and sometimes job to job. For example, flying in the AF means 10 yrs commitment after winging, which takes a yr, so it really is 11 yrs. I believe the Navy or maybe it is the Army requires an 8 yr commitment. That is a big difference.

    Just like the AF you will go AD for 4 yrs (non-rated), no Guard option, but in the Army you have other options.
     
  5. Ozzie3o5

    Ozzie3o5 New Member

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    I've recently found out where the ROTC office is on campus and plan on going within the next week or so. As for my physical fitness, it's far from where it should be. My strength is above average, but my stamina, and cardio are horrible. I've recently started running again, and i plan to reach my appropriate fitness level within the next few months. in regards to the summer months, is there any way that i can participate in internships during the summer while in an ROTC program?
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    ROTC has a specific test for the PFT. It not only includes what must occur (run, push up, sit ups), but form and downtime between each test.

    I suggest you download the PFA to assist you on your training.

    Thinking about this, I am not sure if you can join AFROTC without pushing back your graduation date. The reason why is you must attend SFT (Summer Field Training) to become a POC, and must be a POC for 2 yrs to be commissioned. As a soph right now, you would not go until the summer of your jr. yr., that means you would have to do 1 more yr academically.

    If you choose AFROTC, yes you can do internships. The only time it is an issue is the summer of SFT. That s a 4 week course.

    I believe NROTC also has the same issue you must be in ROTC for 2 yrs and by jr yr classified as a "programmer". This is spring soph., which would make it near impossible (lightening strike) to get this without ever being in NROTC.

    That leaves AROTC, and I will defer to Clarkson, Marist and others to assist you in this manner.
     
  7. Ozzie3o5

    Ozzie3o5 New Member

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    Seems like i took a little too long to seriously consider this. As for graduating late, it's not a big issue, as of now im probably going to graduat late. Since scholarships and financial aid are cutting back, they dont cover summer enrollment so i cant study in the summer. i roughly calculated the extra time, and it'll be one to two semesters extra. Do ROTC scholarships take that into consideration? or do they just look at enrollment date and expected graduation date from that? I think most of these questions would be answered when i go to the AROTC office on campus. Thanks to everyone for all the help, and if anyone has anything else to say please do so. I greatly appreciate all the help.
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Scholarships in every branch are becoming less frequent due to the military budget being cut hard.

    They will take into consideration your graduation date. The reason why is ROTC is what some may call "back fill" for SAs. Each branch has a number they want to meet for newly minted officers. They do so by graduation date.

    It appears you want AROTC. I would strongly suggest you pm Marist or Clarkson if they do not chime in anytime soon. They know the system intimately.
     
  9. Ozzie3o5

    Ozzie3o5 New Member

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    Ok i'll be sure to do that. One last question. What are the chances of being accepted to OCS/OTS after graduating with zero ROTC involvement?
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Nobody can answer that because you are talking about FY2013/14 or 14/15 and right now they are working on FY11/12. DOD doesn't know where they will be in regards to manpower needs 2 yrs from now. If they have met their numbers there may not be an OCS/OTS board, if they haven't met their numbers they may have a board. If they met numbers for specific career fields and not for others they may select on that factor.

    The only answer anyone can give is you have 0% chance if you don't apply.
     
  11. Ozzie3o5

    Ozzie3o5 New Member

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    Ok. Thank you for all your help. You've answered all my primary concerns. I greatly appreciate it.
     
  12. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    Army ROTC has a 5 week summer program called LTC where a student between sophmore and junior years can "catch up" the first two years of ROTC classes. Usually held at Fort Knox. Something to ask about. Now better than later

    Good luck
     
  13. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    You beat me to it NorwichDad.

    NorwichDad is correct about LTC, the issue is that to join AROTC without having participated in the first two years of AROTC you will be required to attend LTC.

    LTC is something you will have to apply for which is becoming more difficult to get due to cutbacks. You will need to be in good physical shape and pass the APFT (Physical Test) with pretty high numbers to be even considered.

    Right now battalions are looking hard at sophomore cadets that are not contracted before allowing them to continue on to the Advanced Course which starts the junior year. The Army is cutting sophomore cadets that are not performing to the standards that are being used now. These are the cadets you will be competing with for the Advanced Course spot, add to that the fact they would need to send you to LTC, you will need to be at the top of your game.

    NorwichDad is also right when he said you should begin the conversation with the ROTC Battalion Now, like today, it will take time to do all the paperwork for the application to LTC and time is running out quickly.

    Good Luck
     
  14. Marist College ROTC

    Marist College ROTC Member

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    All of your posts indicate that you are hoping to "get" something from the military. We are no longer in a situation where we are encouraging applicants who want to check the block and then move on.

    Be absolutely certain that this is what you want to do before you walk through the door of your local ROTC program.
     

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