ROTC and asthma

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by kwame1995, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. kwame1995

    kwame1995 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Alright, so here's the deal when I was younger (I'm finding out when either 12 or 13 which I know is really important which it is) I was diagnosed with exercised induced asthma. First off I believe I was falsely diagnosed due to the fact that I have never had an asthma attack, never had a hard time breathing, I never used my inhaler, and I was never tested for any breathing problems (I just had a very worrying mother). So when I go in for the medical exam for ROTC what should my approach be regarding asthma/ do I still have a chance to pass?
     
  2. Usnavy2019

    Usnavy2019 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2013
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    54
    I am sort of in the same boat you are in. I would go see an asthma specialist. I was diagnosed with exercised-induced asthma when I was 11. I recently took a spirometry test and scored above 100% lung function. If you receive a normal spirometry, show DoDMERB and they will probably pass. I feel it helps to commit your interest in being ROTC to your asthma specialist. I did and I found out he went to school on an ROTC Scholarship. He said no matter what happens, he would write any letter he needs to for me to get cleared. The face to face conversation helps. Also, you might take a Methacholine Challenge Test. You can either take it on your own or DoDMERB might request one if they give you a remedial. If you go see an asthma specialist, I would bring this up as well. If you do not know what a spirometry is, it is breathing into a tube and it measures your lung function and capacity (how much oxygen you move in and out and how much oxygen you can put in your body). The Methacholine Challenge Test is where you're given a drug called Methacholine that induces asthma (bronchoconstriction). You are increasing dosages each time. After each dose, they measure your lung function. If you get through all doses without showing a notable decrease in lung performance (20% drop), you pass. If you do not make it through all the doses or your lung function decreases more than 20%, you fail.

    I wish you the best of luck! If you have any more questions, feel free to PM me!
     
  3. Runner2020

    Runner2020 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2013
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Whenever I was looking into being medically DQ's for asthma, I always heard you were fine if it cleared up after age 14. Did your doctor ever say you had asthma? Were there ever any complications? If not, I wouldn't worry. I've heard of medical waivers for people that have asthma, but don't require an inhaler.

    I run XC/Track, and we thought I had athletically induced asthma for a while after moving to a high elevated state. The problem went away after a year or so, but we looked a lot into the repercussions of asthma for military service, and I've talked a lot to my doctor (who works on an AF base). That's what I've always heard.

    (Honestly, I have no idea if I'm right or not. I'd do what usnavy2019 said. Contact an asthma specialist, and your own doctor. Good luck, and I hope it works out!)
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
  4. kwame1995

    kwame1995 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for answering so quickly! Do you think it's best to see the asthma specialist and take the spirometry test before I do the DoDMERB exam? or should I do all this stuff if I get DQ'd?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Usnavy2019

    Usnavy2019 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2013
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    54
    No problem1:thumb: I would see one before you go for your exam. This way you can send results to DoDMERB an the process will go smoother. If you wait until after, you will go through the DQ process which involves remedials and waiver processes and what not. Also, you can seek guidance from an asthma specialist before hand. He/she could guide you on the asthma portion of the medical questionnaire and how to approach the exam and your asthma. He/she could also write a letter for you that could also help with DoDMERB. Also, keep in mind, with force cuts, waivers do not happen as often, and could take months.
     

Share This Page