ROTC and balancing the rest of school

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Kevin23, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. Kevin23

    Kevin23 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    How difficult is it to balance ROTC and your main academics in college on average?

    I ask because at the college I am transferring to(George Mason University), I am seeking a double major in history/global studies both of which are heavy in coursework. Therefore I am wondering ow other people have balanced ROTC and the other academic demands of college?

    Although I think I will be ok for now, due to the fact that ROTC classes and labs will take on average less time then my other classes at least for this coming year.
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    450
    There are a lot of variables to this question, so your best answer will come from other cadets from JMU, preferably history majors. That being said here's my take.

    You are right, in that ROTC is only one clas on your schedule. If you treat it as such you will be good. It's easy to spend too much time doing ROTC stuff, because it's probably the most fun class you take (hopefully). How your cadre treats your commitment will have a lot to do with your experience too. At my school, where the engineering cadets are in a very demanding program, we expect them to focus on their academics during their first couple years. We expect them to be a little more focused on ROTC in preparation for LDAC in their junior year. As cadre, we check grades review academic plans every semester, and keep track of when the big exams are. If a cadet comes to class, lab, and PT they are fine as long as their doing well academically.

    Treat school as a full time job. Make sure you are putting in the tine, since your majors will probably require a lot of papers/writing/reading. Make sure you are managing your time, and you''ll be fine.

    Finally I would do a little self assessment as to why you want to double major. Is it really going to help you with what you plan to do after college.

    I've got a cadet who is carrying a 4.0 in engineering, plays club hockey, is in a academic fraternity, and is one of our top cadets. It can be done.

    Good luck.
     
  3. House06

    House06 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    Please also remember to factor in additional time for ROTC such as individual PT, weekend mandatory activities ( field training, etc) and unit social events ranging from formals, Christmas parties, hosting fund-raisers, participating in intramural athletic activities.

    Most of these activities are not "required" exactly but as a contracted scholarship student there is an expectation that you will fully participate. PT is particularly important as it determines whether or not you keep scholarship as well as academics.
    So a good plan to follow might be:

    (1) Academics
    (2) ROTC commitments
    (3) any other extra-curricular activities

    This should help keep you on track

    Also consider that if you are going active-duty immediately following graduation/commissioning then having a double major in similiar areas might not necessarily be beneficial. That time could be better spent enjoying college. At the 4-5 year point coming out of active duty assignments with great leadership experience is often more beneficial and appealing to many companies than what major you had- of course depending on your particular long-term goals and plans.
     
  4. Kevin23

    Kevin23 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2009
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    For time I've factored in PT and field exercises, and after looking at things I figure I still have lots of time for my coursework.

    On your other point perhaps I maybe putting too much pressure on myself for something that overlaps? However, I figure my other major(global affairs) could help me also since it is more poli sci and policy oriented and also stresses critical languages, because I eventually want to seek ether a Phd or law degree.

    Thank you for the schedule layout though, I think it lays out everything I have to balance in prospective.
     

Share This Page