ROTC In-College Scholarships

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ahuntedyeti, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    As results are ready to be posted in less than a week for AFROTC with only one board left and NROTC high school scholarships slowly drying up, the wise advice given by you all of maintaining backup plans is being heeded. At this point, I am prepared not to receive a scholarship from either branch and am focusing on putting myself in the best situation to receive an On-Campus or In-College scholarship. Money is not necessarily an issue but any money received would be gratefully accepted. My question is what criteria does the Navy or Air Force look for in MDSN or Cadets when awarding scholarships?

    Does School choice have any weight? For example, would a student attending a top ten public Ivy have any more weight over a student in the same unit attending crosstown Ho Hum State University since the rigor of the school is likely much more difficult?

    Do standardized test scores matter? Would It be wise to enroll in a test prep course over summer for the sole purpose of bettering my chances for a scholarship?

    How much is PT weighted and what is considered "The place to be" (>90%,95%?) This seems to be one of the easiest factors to control and can currently score a 92 on the AF PFT. After a whole summers training and emphasizing form I expect to be near 96-98 range.

    Although I do not know much about the Commanders Ranking Ive gathered from skimming previous material that it is fairly important. What goes into this? I plan on going to a host unit so I can partake in as many activities as possible. How does Battalion size affect this? Would it be more advantageous to be in the San Diego Battalion of 200+ people or the CU Boulder Battalion with less than half that?

    How much does Major choice matter? Is it similar to the high school selection process where the majority of scholarships are awarded to Tech Tiers? My major would be Bio (Tier 2 Navy, Non-Tech AF) And on a side note, where do you want your GPA to end up? Would I be in a better position to get a scholarship with a 3.62 in Bio compared to someone with a 3.85 in Underwater Basket Weaving or someone with a 3.29 in Mech. Engineering?

    Finally, whats even available? Ive heard about On-Campus scholarships, Side load scholarships, 3 year, 2.5 year, Program Scholarships, etc. What would I be competing for as an entering freshman? Sophomore? Kinnem, what was your DS's experience like when competing for his scholarship?

    Thanks for looking over this and for any inout you have. I appreciate all this community has given to Military hopefuls during the entire process. It certainly has made it less nerve-wracking
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I don't know the ISSP procedure, but one thing I would point out is for AFROTC your SAT will matter for SFT selection, it will be part of your future unless you take the AFOQT.

    Personally, if you feel that it is low, and I would say anything below 28 is low, your will want to retake it.

    I would not wait until the fall for many reasons.
    1. Does the college offer SAT/ACT testing, or will you have to find a way to get the nearest HS to take it? Not easy if you don't have a car at college.
    2. You would want to take it in Sept or Oct. Are you willing to miss the football game? How about hanging out Friday night?
    3. College is not HS. You are going to find that it takes a few weeks to get your footing between academics, ROTC and socializing. Do you want to add more to your plate by studying for the SAT?
    4. Taking it in May/June you have been in the academics all yr., and it is fresh on your mind. It is Feb., you have 3 months to study. You will think that during the summer you will study, but what if you have a job? What about that last summer hanging with friends? Life has a way of getting in the way.

    As far as PFT, you really want to be in the 96-98 range that 1st week. It is not so much about the ISSP, but 1st impressions. PT is lead by cadets, and they will be screaming your last name as an example of what not to do.

    Finally, if you have not visited the det you intend to join, do so, and ask to have an interview with the cadre. Inform them that your intention is to compete for an ISSP.

    ~~~ Be prepared that they may be negative about ISSP chances because right now we are in the throws of sequestration. They might feel that for AFROTC this will be a cut.
    ~~~ Ask what cgpa/SAT scores they feel will be needed for their support for an ISSP.
    ~~~ Same with PFT.

    This will accomplish a couple of things.
    1. Introduction to the cadre...a face with a name.
    ~~~ They can now keep an eye on you day 1.
    2. Inform you of your own weaknesses
    ~~~ Gives you time to make a plan of attack for yourself.


    Good luck
     
  3. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    Thanks Pima. I have a 30 ACT currently so I guess it works. Good points about taking later though. As my college choices solidify I may or may not take it again. We are planning a trip up to Seattle this spring break so I will schedule an interview with the cadre at UW (Navy) and to Montana State (AF) a little after! Any other questions that would be wise to ask?
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    look on the other thread regarding SFT and gpa.

    The most important thing is to feel comfortable at the unit. Have your folks leave so it is you 1 on 1 with cadets/mids.
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    For NROTC, regardless of option, you can apply for a sideload scholarship each semester starting the second semester of your freshman year. If you don't get a scholarship, then the same scholarship application you submitted in the spring of your sophomore year will be used to determine if you will be awarded advanced standing.

    For autumn 2011 (which would mean all applicants were sophomores) for Marine Option avg. SAT (Math & CR) was about 1250, avg ACT was 30. Avg. PFT was around 280 of 300. Avg GPA was 3.6.

    I can't speak to averages for autumn 2012 but here are my son's stats:
    PFT 296 or better consistently, SAT 1310, cum GPA 3.69.

    It's a national competition and I don't think the school carries any weight unless it's accounted for in weighing your GPA. Autumn 2012 only 11 Marine Option scholarships were awarded according to what I heard and 9 of those were Navy Options changing to Marine Option.

    I don't know Navy Option numbers but I expect they're in the same ballpark but perhaps a bit lower as I also expect most were tech majors. I'm sure many more scholarships were awarded than for Marines.

    So you have to do damned well in Navy. DOn't know what weight the cadre's recommendation carries. I also agree with others that you'll do better if your comfortable with the school and the unit.

    Hope this is helpful. If there is something I left out that you think would be useful info for you then feel free to ask. I may not know but I'll be happy to provide it if I do know.
     
  6. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    Pima: I've been reading that around the threads. I will do that!
    Kinnem: Wow! I did not realize competition was that intense. I'm assuming Navy does look at your test scores since they post the stats. Just to clarify, was that 11 awarded in his battalion?
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    No. Sorry I wasn't clear... that was 11 awarded NATIONWIDE. Fall of 2011 was around 22 I think. I've never seen any spring numbers. Might be higher or might be lower, but freshman will also be in the mix with the second semester sophomores in the spring. I believe Navy option has a little over 100 to give each year, for this year and next. No idea how the apportion that between spring and fall. dunninla would know the exact number for sure though.

    I share your assumption about the test scores, but it is an assumption. It's listed on the application as well so it seems like they consider them, unless they're just creating busy work.
     
  8. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    Unbelievable. It's hard to wrap your mind around that! Seems like you have to be nearly perfect to get it. Sounds like if you don't go into the program with a scholarship, chances are if you make it to commissioning, you will be graduating without ever receiving one.
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Well, like I said, the number of scholarships available for Navy Option are much higher than Marine Option. I also expect the NROTC enrollment numbers are much lower than Army. Would stand to reason. I also expect, but cannot say, that there are more scholarships available for Army. The question though is what are the proportions of available scholarships to non-scholarship cadet population. I surely don't know the answer to that one.

    And regarding perfection... don't you want to shoot for that? Number wise my son looked pretty good, but trust me, he had hurdles he had to overcome and came near to being tossed from the program once early freshman year. I think he dodged that bullet only because it was early freshman year. Upon reflection, I'm glad he went through that harrowing experience. So, perfect? No. Determined and aspiring? Yes. Good numbers? Absolutely.

    If you work hard, keep your nose clean (or pretty clean), and can find a way to shine within your unit, I think you have a good shot at a scholarship and you will certainly achieve advanced standing, which is nothing to sneeze at. The thing I remember the units MOI and a former MIDN who is now an Ensign, saying about my son was that he was a hard worker. And they would both recognize hard workers and I've never seen anyone work harder than these two guys. The Ensign was in EOD training last fall and I've no doubt he's on his way to SEALS at some point. On paper my son's major is History, but his real major, in terms of it occupying his life, is NROTC MO.

    All that being said, if its the scholarship you're chasing, I think you might have more luck in Army. But I also think you should choose based on what you want to do after college. Fours years of doing it in College, and 4-5 years Active Duty, will wear on you if you're not doing what you want to do. Trust me. It's difficult to excel if you don't really want to be there.

    Good luck.
     
  10. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    Wise advice Kinnem, thank you. Your DS sounds like a great guy an I look forward to serving with him one day. From tho point on its deciding on whether to go out of state or not. I only applied to two colleges without NROTC, so ill be sticking with the navy (AF maybe) scholarship or not.
    Thanks again
     
  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Have you heard anything regarding financial aid from the OOS schools? Or any schools for that matter. If not, sit tight until you do. You should have until May 1 to make a decision. Patience is the order of the day here.

    I think one reason my son did well is that he actually ended up at his #1 choice OOS school, University of South Carolina! (and who wouldn't go there? :biggrin:). He was able to attend as they granted him a scholarship which reduced the tuition to near in state rates. Sending him there was only a couple thousand more per year than sending him to NC State down the road. Since he wasn't particularly interested in NC State, and the cost diff wasn't too bad we went with #1 school. Also, he had to maintain a 3.0 GPA to keep the scholarship, and he was told if he loses it he's coming back home for school. Great motivator! BTW, he also had to make up the difference with student loans as I wanted him to have some financial skin in the game as well. Another great motivator.

    You're right to be thinking all this through but you still have plenty of time to make a decision. Mid-April should be soon enough to make the final decision and cut the deposit check. Hopefully you will get good news from some source regarding funding by then. Either way, you'll know what you are up against. I think most, or at least many, schools do not release financial aid info until April 1.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013

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