ROTC to become a doctor

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by beck8, Dec 5, 2015.

  1. beck8

    beck8 New Member

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    So basically, I am currently applying for the four year Army ROTC scholarship for the Second Board. Basically my question is: If I get this scholarship and go into ROTC, would I have to serve the 4/8yrs before I went to med school? Or could I immediately go to med school on a scholarship again and just add those years onto my undergrad?
     
  2. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent Member

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    #1 it depends. If you don't have the grades, premed curriculum, good MCAT score, and ECs you would likely have to complete your obligated service before medical school.
    #2 it depends. If you have the grades, premed curriculum, good MCAT score, ECs, recommendation of PMS, Educational Delay granted, and a med school acceptance (or highly likely accepted) then you can immediately go to med school. Getting the follow on scholarships like HPSP are a separate application.

    There are significant hurdles....good grades, time to do well in ROTC, medical ECs, ability to take classes outside your major as premed requirements......

    A very small percent of students intending to go to medical school actually accomplish that goal. It's even more difficult if you have distractions like ROTC. Most active duty doctors recommend you do not do ROTC for your undergraduate degree to limit your commitment and to ensure you are able to fully commit the time for your premed commitments.

    You are likely 17 years old and if you get the ROTC scholarship and do well in your undergraduate with an acceptance to med school paid for by the US Government you have now committed yourself until you are at least 30. UG 4years + 4 years med school + 3-6 years residency + 4 year ROTC payback + 3-5 year Med School payback.

    It can be done but ROTC purpose for all services is to provide line officers (Army 16 primary branches).

    Some of the hurdles my daughter experienced in AROTC prior to the Educational Delay were significant and nearly derailed her aspirations for medical school. Despite a chemistry major, not all the premed requirements are required for that degree. ROTC chose not to accommodate taking the extra classes in Human Phys for example (+others) because it was not required for her declared major. There was a direct conflict between mandatory ROTC classes and scheduling the premed requirements so guess what.... ROTC wins.

    Go read the Student Doctor Network Forum. Don't give up your dream but plan well and plan for detours.
     
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  3. Olivia76262

    Olivia76262 Member

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    Would the answer be similar for specialized nursing? I'm hopefully doing Army ROTC on scholarship to get a BSN, and then I want to do graduate school (2 years) to be a Nurse Anesthetist.
     
  4. USN16x

    USN16x Member

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    Nursing is somewhat different. You can't put in for an Ed delay and go straight into CRNA school, however you could decide to commission into the reserve/guard and after you get some critical care experience apply to CRNA school. There is a way to become a CRNA through the army but it is extremely competitive and I don't have all the details for it. Good luck!
     
  5. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent Member

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    USN16x is correct. AROTC nursing students cannot apply for Educational Delay. Check the regulation for Army ROTC Educational Delay. Search this forum, I think the links were posted in the past.

    The 2LT Nurse I know that graduated with my daughter from undergraduate was very highly ranked in the AROTC national OML and chose Army Reserves in order to get experience in her nursing career and specialize as a CRNA. Check the USUHS website too. They may have a CRNA program for active duty nurses having served some years on active duty.
     
  6. Olivia76262

    Olivia76262 Member

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    Thanks for the information y'all! It's really helpful.
     
  7. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    If you go Army ROTC nursing you will be in a nursing program, and when you graduate you will be an Army nurse with a 4 year nursing degree.

    A different path than becoming a doc via the ed delay program.
     
  8. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    Once commissioned in the AMEDD-4 (MS, AN, VC, SP), you have the opportunity to further your medical education through USHUS or LTHET. The majority use LTHET. I used LTHET for my second masters and I'm applying through LTHET for my second doctorate.

    Keep in mind if you are picked up for HPSP at anytime in your career, all previous ADSO's are null and void.

    I second the previous poster about avoiding ROTC if med school is your die hard goal. The stars have to align if you want to go straight out of ROTC.

    Learning battle drill 1A is important for a 70B MS Officer to know; not so much for a nurse or physician.
     
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  9. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    You won't be eligible to attend CRNA school for a while.

    All new ROTC nurses have to do a few years med-surg then they can apply for the ICU nursing course. After finishing the course you will need additional years of ICU experience, then you can apply. It's at least a 6 year journey after graduation. The program is extremely competitive to get into as well.

    Keep in mind MANY new nurses want to become CRNAs (the money...), few do.
     

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