Running Shoes

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by ibgingerxx, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. ibgingerxx

    ibgingerxx New Member

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    I really like running in Nike Free Runs and have completed many miles in them w/o injury for many months. I really don't like to have too much in my running shoes, but the Instructions for Applicants Offered Admission states,

    "These shoes should be designed specifically for running with maximum
    shock absorption and a balance of motion control and cushioning characteristics. These shoes should not be of the “cross training” variety. They should have a sturdy heel counter, elevated heel, and cushioned mid-sole"

    Would I be able to bring running shoes with little support if I choose?
     
  2. another13mom

    another13mom Member

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    Do you live in a very hilly area or flatlands? If you're not used to running on big and long and high hills, you will likely want a more structured running shoe for the downhills to avoid shin splints and knee tendonitis. The recommendation is based on years of experience with new cadets and the injuries they see when introducing lots of running on hills in a short amount of time. You may want to take their advice for the summer, and then incorporate your favorite shoe during the academic year?
     
  3. SuaSponte

    SuaSponte Member

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    If you really have done a lot of training in Frees (including hilly environments) then you will probably be fine. If you aren't a very serious runner, I would consider getting something with a little more cushioning because the hilly pavement running will hurt you in the long run. This advice is more geared towards those who don't run much though, and a lot of inexperienced runners choose minimal shoes because they're trendy, subsequently getting lower leg injuries.
     
  4. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    I have no idea where people get the idea that Nike in any way shape or form makes quality running shoes. The Nike Frees are another example of a fad gone too far all in the name of style (Much like Mac computers in college). I had minimalist shoes for a while but when I was PTing 5 days a week 3-4 miles a day, I realized very fast that I needed support.

    Whether you have no arch or a very prominent arch you can't go wrong with solid pair of Asics or Brooks...


    Source: I sold running shoes pre-Army....
     
  5. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    Go to a store that specifically sells running shoes (i.e Fleet Feet in Atlanta is such a store; there are many others). Pay for a good fit. They will study your feet and suggest what you need based on what the expectations are for running at WP. Get good shoes. Don't skimp.
     
  6. HeWantsTheBFE

    HeWantsTheBFE USAFA Class of 2017

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    My personal favorites are the Mizuno WaveRunner Series. I dont know what the uniform policy is, b/c they come in all kinds of funky colors.
     
  7. hawk

    hawk ButterBar Dad

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    ^^^^^^^^ This!!!!

    as an aside.... I'd really be cautious about funky colors and odd designs for CBT.

    I've not heard of candidates hassled last 2-3 years over neon green/blue/pink/yellow shoes, but you probably don't want to attract attention with a standout.

    Same for exotic shoe types. Realistically, the running you will do will be in groups and other than for the APFT, non-critical. You want to do well, but that .5 second advantage from the "super light weight, feel the road, looks like gorilla feet" shoes will not make a difference.

    Once out of CBT you can go as exotic as you dare. (Most have learned by then)
     
  8. wnal0311

    wnal0311 Member

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    so at cbt do we run paved hills?
     
  9. ArmyStrong7

    ArmyStrong7 Member

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    Yes....West Point is a very very very hilly place, so be prepared.
     
  10. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

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    Great advice! Nikes are what my cadet candidate was running in before CBT several years ago and he ended up with crippling shin splints. Doctor sent him to a running shoe store for Brooks motion control shoes. Made all the difference.

    Don't forget to get new ones fairly regularly; you'll be surprised how many miles you put on them.
     
  11. Zimmermann 45

    Zimmermann 45 Member

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    Like what Dixieland said you should by new shoes every now and then (my track coach says they will begin to wear out and one can risk injury).
     
  12. SuaSponte

    SuaSponte Member

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    For another example, I run 9-10 miles a day in a very hilly town in CT. I tried minimalist shoes (and like many others transitioned too quickly) and got tendonitis for a while. I like my Asics and Sauconys (the Sauconys are somewhat minimal though) for the hilly pavement. Just to reiterate, be prepared to ice a lot if you aren't used to less supportive footwear.

    Another thing, most running shoes can last a good 500-600 miles or even more if you take good care of them, I usually get a new pair every season.
     
  13. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

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    Maybe a current cadet who has completed CBT will chime in, but I don't believe there is time to sit around and ice your legs during Beast. You are expected to arrive in shape and ready to run.
     
  14. robinhood17

    robinhood17 USMA Cadet

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    To the above ^^ no, there is not a lot of time to ice during beast. There really isn't enough time to catch your breath let alone sit down.


    You can ask the company medic at night for ice, they will have on hand to ice before you sleep. this is pretty common.


    Come to beast over prepared. if the minimum workout sheet says 3 miles, run 4,5. do more pushups. do more situps.


    running shoes make the difference between fun and easy pt sessions and painful grueling ones.

    I ran varsity track/cross country before coming, changed my shoe from a NB790 (light weight trail running shoe) to the heavier Asics Gt2150 in preparation for the hills. For me:horrible decision. I wasn't ready for that weight on my foot or added milage and hills. My shins were killing me.


    If you run comfortably in that shoe, why change what works? you're chancing injuy with a new shoe you are not used to. My opinion at least.
     
  15. Lcwick

    Lcwick PrayingforWP

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    Good running shoes can not be overrated!!!!

    I have been a runner for many years, participating in the Boston Marathon last year for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. During my training for LLS we had many seminars to make us as safe and successful as possible. One of the biggest things stressed was having great running sneakers that are fit by a reputable running store. I wear Asics and swear by them for running, but there are many well made running shoes that could be right for you. With that being said I myself tried The Nike Free for cross training and found them fine for that but would never run in them, not enough support for hills or distance. You should be able to find a light enough pair you can adjust to before you get to Beast. Do yourself a favor, the last thing you want to deal with over the summer is shin splints, especially when they can be avoided. Stretching after runs is also key! Good luck to you! :thumb:
     

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