Running

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by rotcdonde, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. rotcdonde

    rotcdonde Member

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    Apologies if there's another thread regarding this topic...I checked the last 10 pages or so and couldn't find one.

    For my army rotc scholarship, i ran the mile in just under 10 minutes. I'm sure i wouldnt have been able to do any more, and am glad i didnt have to. Since then (i took the pft in december) i have not done any running at all.
    I'd like to at least be able to pass the apft by the time i go to college in august. I'd like it even better if i could be able to run 4 or 5 miles at a good pace by that time.
    I went running a few days ago--right now, i have a major problem with getting side stitches after about a minute of running.

    Does anyone have any suggestions, both for how to not get the side stitches or how to properly build up to a good number of miles at a good pace in under 5 months?
     
  2. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Run more.

    Seriously, it takes practice. Run a mile for your best time every other day. On odd days, run 3-5 at a quick jogging pace.

    A little soreness is OK, but if it is serious, cut back a little.
     
  3. skc

    skc Member

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    If possible talk to track/cross country coach, google running programs, go to book store, ask a runner etc, there are many places to obtain information on beginning a running program. Most important start today and dont stop.
     
  4. osdad

    osdad Member

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  5. rotcdonde

    rotcdonde Member

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    thanks osdad. this looks really helpful and close to my level...haha
     
  6. Ken2012

    Ken2012 Prospective

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    If you could talk to a coach that would be cool. They have great advice and can help you achieve great results. If you have the time to join track I'm sure they would love to work with you. Track helped me in my first season.

    Here's my advice. I'm not the best though. I'm a track runner and I have a mile time of around 6 minutes.
    - Make sure that you are well hydrated. It is a pain to run with a dry throat and I did not finish a race one time because of it.
    - Side stitches - This is most likely from your body not being used to the running. What I gather from a quick search is that you need to work on breathing or core muscles. I often have these when I run after a period of inactivity but I find they go away.
    - Simply just run. A lot. You'll develop energy and speed if you push yourself while running. If you live near a track that would be recommended. Running on roads is kind of painful. At least for me.
    - Alternate runs. Try variations of short sprints/walks, sprint/run, fast run/jog, etc.
    - Rest. Take a rest every now and again. Developing a schedule would be even better.

    Don't forget to stretch and warm up.

    This is all I can think of at the moment but if you have any more questions I'm sure me or anywhere else can try to answer it.
     
  7. BeatNavy

    BeatNavy USMA Cadet

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    Also, make sure you have good running shoes. If you have a running store in your area that is a good place to go because they can fit you with the proper type shoe for your stride. Running in improper shoes can lead to injuries and soreness.
     
  8. vampsoul

    vampsoul Candidate

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    stewsmith.com Stew Smith is a retired SEAL who now writes fitness books and articles. On this site are various running programs for all skill levels and goals.
     
  9. 2012Cadet

    2012Cadet Member

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    Wait...so for ROTC Scholarship you can get a 10:00 mile and still be passing...man, am I set with that.:shake:
     
  10. attacklax17

    attacklax17 Prospective

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    For the first few days, run as long as you can. It's alright if you walk a bit, it won't kill you. Run/Walk for 20 minutes a day. Distance doesn't matter.
    After about a week of that, start running non-stop for 20 minutes. Keep a good pace.
    Then, start doing 3 mile timed runs. Try to crush your time every week by maybe 15 seconds, or 30 if you're doing good.
    Tuesday + Thursday do hard workouts. Go for a 2 mile jog, then find a decent hill and do 6 or 7 solid sprints up. Weekends you can take off, but it helps to fit in a quick run if you can.
    Just keep doing timed 3 miles and hills. Eventually you will get into a groove where you feel weird if you miss a day of running. Sometimes, maybe once a week, do a 5+ mile run. This doesn't have to be super fast at all. Do your own pace as long as it's not walking.

    A few other things that help me are:
    -Eat pasta/carbs for dinners. They really help with your energy levels.
    -A banana with breakfast and/or wo hours before you run really helps with cramps.
    - Lots of water. Try to put down 2 or 3 nalgenes a day.
    -Core workouts are also essential. Do planks, crunches, supermans or any others you know for 20 minutes after the non-hard workout days.
    -I'm the only one on my xcountry team that does this but, try doing 30 situps before you run. For some reason it REALLY helps me with cramps that I may get.

    good luck with the running! :smile:
     
  11. KveTina

    KveTina Member

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    Also, this sounds a little weird but I remember reading this somewhere. I don't know if it actually works because there is some scientific explanation behind it or if doing this has some kind of placebo effect but when I run and I start to get cramps, I exhale everytime I step on my left foot and inhale when I step on my right foot. And it really works!
     
  12. rotcdonde

    rotcdonde Member

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    well, it was a 9:56...also i'm female and i had excellent test scores, ec's, and grades...i guess it's just not weighted too highly. im glad i got the scholarship! :biggrin:


    also, thanks attacklax17. that looks like really good advice :thumb:
     
  13. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    This was something I did way back to solve the same problem. Worked for me too. A reason that I was taught was that the liver (which is right side dominant) will actually stretch on its ligaments and start causing the cramps and this supposedly relieves the pressure. While I can't confirm this (though my anatomy class with cadavers wouldn't make it implausible), I think it just helps actively to control your breathing since erratic breathing tends to lead to cramps.
     
  14. xTxMANx

    xTxMANx Member

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    A good running program is set by PODRUNNER on podcast. look it up. they have a program to get you from 0-5k in no time at all. and then for some extra fun, they go all the way to a marathon!
    It is a basic program of electronica beats that put you into segments of regimented rhythms of running and walking until you are able to run long periods, and then later lessons increase the tempo to get you to speed up.

    If anything, it is a great timing program to allow you to learn to time and rest without completely stopping.
     
  15. 2012Cadet

    2012Cadet Member

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    Oh...that makes sense...never mind then.
     
  16. BR2011

    BR2011 USAFA Cadet

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    Keep breathing at the same pace for the entire run, even when you get tired and feel like you need to take short breaths. Inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth.
     
  17. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    Is there a particular benefit to doing this?
     
  18. Ken2012

    Ken2012 Prospective

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    I think it has to do something with the nose being like a filter and filtering air. Or something like that. I honestly think that breathing in anyway comfortable is fine. I do agree with keeping breathing consistent though.
     
  19. BeatNavy

    BeatNavy USMA Cadet

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    Actually, you are consuming less air by breathing in through your nose and putting yourself at a disadvantage. Breathing through your mouth allows you take in more air and improve endurance.
     
  20. 2012Cadet

    2012Cadet Member

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    I have also noticed this....don't know who came up with the technique, but it doesn' work...at least for me.
     

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