running

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by navy2016, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    I have some questions concerning running in general:
    A. Am I pushing myself too hard?
    I ran 4 miles last Saturday (never gone before 3 miles before) and attempted to go 5 miles yesterday but stopped at 2 miles due to leg fatigue. I have gone to soccer practice 3 out of the 5 days this past week and felt like I have not fully recovered from last Saturday.

    B. How do you minimize ankle pain?
    After going 3 miles last Saturday my ankle starting feeling this shock of pain with every step (I had the intention of going 5 miles but stopped at 4 to prevent any potential injuries).

    C. What is the best breathing rhythm for running longer distances?

    D. For running the CFA mile, would it be a good idea to run gradually faster as you go along?

    I just started doing soccer this year; we don't do timed runs, we just run in intervals during practice. I have never done cross country/track. I used to run around my neighborhood periodically but now do it on consistent basis.
    I run about a 6:20- 6:40 mile and want to get it under 6 minutes or get the max 5:20 for the CFA.

    Any input/tips would be appreciated!


    PS= I really wished we had a forum on preparing for CFA/fitness.
     
  2. CandidateElias15

    CandidateElias15 USNA '15 Appointee

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey.. take it easy.
    If you're running 2,3 miles now, do NOT overwork your muscles. That's dangerous, and you should rest your ankle before trying to improve.

    To answer C: I use a breathing count of three steps. Count 1,2,3,inhale. Count 1,2,3, exhale. But that's just me. Track guys would probably do something different.

    The guy that's helped me for the CFA, at NASS, and who's helping me prepare for Plebe Summer is Stew Smith. I'd suggest you go to this website, read anything by him or anyone else that would seem to help.
    http://www.military.com/fitness-center/military-fitness/pt-workouts/archive
    But until then, realize that the CFA is a little portion of your application. Don't injure yourself. Stay safe.
     
  3. gzemx

    gzemx Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's probably a matter of preference, but I think running at a constant speed is best for the mile. Then, maybe sprint towards the end to save a handful of seconds. I did the CFA during summer seminar and ran a 5:32 mile. I took it a little slow at the beginning which I wasn't able to make up for towards the end. If I had kept my average pace at the beginning, I don't think i would have had any trouble making the max. For breathing rhythm, I find that two quick short breaths in followed by two quick short breaths out work best for me.
     
  4. QT314

    QT314 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    All I can say is don't overdo it in your eagerness to get in the best shape. My son (who is now at USNA) hurt himself right before plebe summer trying to do the same. He was in great shape, played soccer, ran everyday - but went from running 2-3 miles every other day to running 8 miles/day overnight. He ended up with stress injuries and ended up worried about whether or not he'd make it through plebe summer. Luckily, he did - but it did make it that much harder. Obviously you want to follow a regimen for staying in good shape, but you have to make sure you listen to your body and condition yourself - you have plenty of time. Don't forget to do those push-ups, sit-ups and pull-ups.
    The only other thing I could suggest is to make sure you have really good sneakers that support your foot - it can make a dramatic difference.

    Good luck!
     
  5. quick

    quick Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    As everyone else has said take it easy kid. It takes almost a full year for a runner to become a runner. Your lungs, muscles, tendons, and most importantly you bones need that long to become used to the pounding of running. Where you are now is good. Mix your runs up. Do a 1.5-2 mile speed run where you run decently faster than you would for a longer run. Alternate that with longer 4-5 mile slower runs for endurance. Know the differnce between good pain and bad pain. If your legs are sore that is good. It means your muscles are tearing and repairing themselves, thus building more muscle. If joints start to hurt, cool it. You do 't want to stress them to the point of injury. Someone up there said they were using Stew Smiths workout to help them. Definitely take a look at his website/books. I'm using one of his SEAL workout books and it is truly an amazing workout. Best of luck to you.

    P.S. I've always found that breathing is a personal thing. A general rule though is to take lonf slow breathes to relax your body. A relaxed body is the key to running distance.
     
  6. fishbowl

    fishbowl Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Echo everyone else - take it easy! Going from 2- 3 miles to 8 can cause a stress fracture that will take weeks to heal. Also as others have posted, your diaphram muscle, which is just below your ribs, needs to develop. I know that it's counter intuitive, but when you inhale, push your stomach out. This allows your lungs to expand freely because your diaphram is relaxed. Exhaling, your diaphram muscle contracts, forcing the air out of your lungs (think about the heimlich for someone who is choking). The right running shoes are also important and can make a big difference. If finances allow, go to a store that specialized in running. The sales people are usually runners. Tell them about what your running goals are, where you feel pain, etc., and they should be able to help fit you with the proper shoes. Take your time and try on several different manufacturers and you will find the size (you may think you're a 9 1/2, but maybe a 9 in a Brooks feels better than a 9 1/2 in New Balance) and manufacturer that is right for you.
     
  7. hockeypunk9199

    hockeypunk9199 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Deff take it easy. However, one thing you could do that has prepared me greatly for distance running is doing some cross training. For instance, ride your bike instead of going for a run for a while maybe go for a swim. This well help with cardio and muscle without the pressure on your shins and ankles on the road. Lastly, if you can find a tredmill that could help I find that the treadmill is easier on joints and feet bc it's not as tough as pavement. Have some protein ad stretch a lot before and after.
     
  8. FlytillIdie

    FlytillIdie Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2011
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    The best thing to get better at running is well...running.
    You need to pace your self. If you receive an appointment to USNA
    you won't be leaving for another 4 months, so make a workout
    program that will develop over the next 4 months. You want to end
    the program being at a 6:30 pace for 3 miles. BUT, before all that,
    start out running 2 miles at a comfortable pace. Stretch good before
    and after you run as well. When your running distance, the best
    way to breathe is to do 2 breathes in through your nose and then
    2 out your mouth or a pattern similar to that, but making it in through
    the nose, and exhale through your mouth. Try to push your self, but
    remember not to push your self too hard or else you might lose a few
    days because of recovery... Remember that 4 months equals 16 weeks...
    So try taking off somewhere around 5-10 seconds per mile per week
    and you will be at your target in no time! Remember to throw in a "off"
    week as well! So like 2 weeks running, 1 week swimming, or 2 weeks
    running, and 1 week bicycling..Trust me it helps. Also remember to not only
    focus on running but calasthenics. Do pushups, pullups, ab work, etc...
    Also the only way to get better at pullups is actually doing pull ups..
    Do negatives. Where you jump up into pullup position and then SLOWLY
    bringing your self into the hanging position. This utilizes the same muscle
    groups and will gradually build your muscle and will increse the amount of
    pull ups that you can do. If you have any more questions, just shoot me
    message and ill reply to it as quick as possible ! Good luck! :shake:
     
  9. CandidateInSD

    CandidateInSD Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2010
    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    0
    there is so much great advice here, also keep in mind that shinsplints are another hazard in over doing the running. My son was pushing too hard, got shinsplints and it kept him from running for well over a month....remember, everything in moderation, you don't want to show up at I-day broken...
     
  10. USNAhopeful~2015

    USNAhopeful~2015 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aboslute great advice I think I'll take for myself. Thanks!
     
  11. MIDNDAD

    MIDNDAD Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    1
    The advice to pace yourself and do not get hurt is the best advice to follow for the next several months. These are your last few months of freedom. Suggest you enjoy them becuse they will be gone forever once you hit your I-Day. You do not want to be out of shape at I-Day but no matter how good you think you are the detailers will make you better.

    Just got this text from my Firsty, who will commision as a Marine in May:

    Dad

    Today is off day from Rugby practice. The team takes off for Ireland Friday. My morning began at 0800 with Marine Combat conditioning for an hour. At lunch I swam laps for another hour. After afternoon classes I did a full set of Cross Fit training and then ran a 5K. Done with my day off now :)
     
  12. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Messages:
    1,217
    Likes Received:
    126

    This is superb advice! My USMA cadet did it in the reverse---got fitted for the nice shoes after the sports medicine doctor ordered him to take a month off from running to heal his shin splints. Having an expert fit him for the proper shoe to correct his pronation made all the difference in the world.
     
  13. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    609
    Likes Received:
    2
    Thanks for all the advice!

    One quick clarification: I am only a high school junior; not yet in the process of waiting for the appointment letter.

    Nevertheless, I still see the need to get fit now.
     

Share This Page