Sailing In The North Pacific

Discussion in 'Merchant Marine Academy - USMMA' started by St. Crispian, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. St. Crispian

    St. Crispian New Member

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    Are there any "cadets" sailing in the North Pacific? Was anyone in a Japanese port at the time of the quake/tsunami? Interesting to what your eyes focus on in news videos since becoming part of the Kings Point family. Can any of the alums comment on having sailed through a tsunami? How do you position the ship if you have warning, what preparations are made?
    Fair winds and small seas.
     
  2. 2009KPer

    2009KPer Member

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    If you're in a port where a warning has been issued and there is sufficient time, you will generally get underway and put to sea as soon as possible. The ship itself can handle the surge. It's everything around the ship (like piers, cranes, the bottom) that causes problems. Being at sea is the safer place

    If at sea, there is really nothing to be done as a tsunami "wave" is only a few inches high and not felt at all nor is it any danger to the ship.
     
  3. deepdraft1

    deepdraft1 Master, Ocean Steam or Motor Vessels, unlimited

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    [FONT=&quot]2009KPer is correct, ships are safer out at sea then in port during a Tsunami event. Tidal surge and current can cause ships to part lines, come adrift, possibly ground and cause additional damage to port infrastructure. As he said the wave height at sea is small, generally less than one meter. That’s as opposed to a wind generated swell which can reach over 12 meters, depending on the fetch. Certain ports are more prone to damage from a tsunami; Honolulu harbor being a good example. As a matter of fact, I had a question on the local knowledge section of my Honolulu pilotage exam asking what the sortie [/FONT][FONT=&quot]order [/FONT][FONT=&quot]is [/FONT][FONT=&quot]for vessels ready to depart under [/FONT][FONT=&quot]a [/FONT][FONT=&quot]Tsunami warning[/FONT][FONT=&quot]. As [/FONT][FONT=&quot]I recall [/FONT][FONT=&quot]it [/FONT][FONT=&quot] was [/FONT][FONT=&quot]g[/FONT][FONT=&quot]overnment vessels, passenger vessels, tankers, vessels with explosive cargo, and freighters.[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Specific guidance and information for ships regarding Tsunamis is usually found in the Coast Pilot (U.S. waters) and Sailing Directions (foreign waters) publications.[/FONT]
     
  4. St. Crispian

    St. Crispian New Member

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    Thanks, 09KPer and deepdraft. Having been a lubber all my life (kayaks and canoes excepted) I find this shiphandling information really fascinating. Thanks, again.
     
  5. kpskilegac

    kpskilegac Member

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    Apparently there were a couple of mids in Southern Japan that made their way to the naval base and caught a hop to China. Reportedly all are well and on their way.
     
  6. Sea Faring Moose Mom

    Sea Faring Moose Mom Member

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    Safe harbor

    Via 1 / c students.....Thank goodness for email and facebook. 8 KPers in the area are all safe and sound. Most left port to head for the safety of the sea.

    This report was on Saturday, March 12 while DD was home for Break.

    :biggrin:
     

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