Senator Nom vs Congressional Nom

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by jebdad, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. jebdad

    jebdad Member

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    Wouldn't it be acknowledged that receiving a senatorial nomination is a more difficult task than a congressional nomination as you are competing against the entire state? That being said, if your state does not duplicate nominations and you have received a senatorial nomination only, you could be at a disadvantage initially. The senatorial slate would have the top candidates in the entire state and you would have to beat them out for the competitive nomination.

    Whereas, with a competitive slate on a congressional nomination you only have to beat out the top people from your congressional district.

    Am I looking at this correctly? I would think I would rather be the big fish in the small pond even though it seems more impressive to have the senatorial nom.
     
  2. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

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    In many states, the staffs of the senators and MOCs all work together to have as many noms as possible.

    No one cares if you get it from a senator, MOC, VP, just get it.

    And, should you be lucky enough to get an appointment, subsequently show up for I-Day, and experience the joy of BCT, if you think you're bragging by saying "I got my nom from Senator So n so," well, your parents don't want to see that on webguy.
     
  3. jebdad

    jebdad Member

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    I am sorry. I must have phrased the question wrong. I was simply asking if it can be a disadvantage to be on a senatorial competitive slate vs. a congressional competitive slate. A senatorial competitive slate would appear to be more competitive due to fact that it encompasses the entire state.
     
  4. TV4caster

    TV4caster Member

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    It is probably a disadvantage to ending up #1 on the 10 person list, but because it is a stronger pool there are usually more candidates from numbers 2-9 that are chosen over a Congressperson's list.

    That is because, if you didn't know, everyone numbered 2-9 on every list gets ranked by the NA and goes into a big pool and then they fill unused slots starting with the highest ranked.
     
  5. mdn18

    mdn18 Member

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    It all depends on how your state works. Here in PA, my teacher's son was nominated by my local MOC and one of the Senators (Casey or Toomey, I forget). Some do principal lists, rankings, un-ranked. It varies all over the country.

    At the end of the day though, a nom is a nom. Yes, it would seem like a Senator nom would be something to be more proud of, but it doesn't "really" matter.
     
  6. USNA_TF_12

    USNA_TF_12 Member

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    The way I understand it, anyone nominated but not a principal nominee goes to the national wait list. It does't matter who nominated you to the NWL, but the academy choses from this list as a whole. So you aren't directly competing with the rest of the people on your nom's slate, but rather everyone else in the country who wasn't a principal nominee. This way, it does't matter who put you on slot 2-9. Therefore, I don't believe there is a disadvantage to getting a senator's nomination vs a congressional one. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that is how it works.
     
  7. jebdad

    jebdad Member

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    I guess I had the wrong understanding. I thought that on a competitive slate they have to first take the best and then everyone else goes to the nwl. I was assuming it would be harder to be the #1 person on a Senate competitive slate. Wouldn't seem to be unrealistic that in some congressional districts that they could have a #1 candidate that would not even make the Senate list.
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    In general your view is essentially correct for competitive slates. As others have pointed out, if one doesn't receive an appointment as a result of the competition with their slate members one goes on the NWL. The logic perhaps changes somewhat there, but ultimately it all comes down to the whole person score.
     
  9. TV4caster

    TV4caster Member

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    You weren't completely wrong. I think your point about #1 on a list from someplace weak potentially not being as strong as someone who didn't even make the top 10 on a Senator's list (especially from a very competitive state) is true. There are districts where nobody even bothers to apply. In those districts a weak candidate who is the only applicant ends up #1 on that list.

    As Mdn18 pointed out earlier, there are different methods for different MOC. Some MOC just give the NA a 1-10 list. Others give a list and say that #1 is the one they want to get in.
     
  10. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    This doesn't address OPs question, but I have a quick question: Is National Wait List a new term? My understanding was that those that don't "win" their slate (or are not charged to their slate) go into the NQP (National Qualified Pool) and compete against all other qualified candidates in the pool Nationally, for the remaining appointments. Once all appointments are given out, those that are highly qualified but didn't receive an appointment (qualified, no vacancy) may be placed on a wait list and my be given an appointment if enough other appointees decline their appointment and a vacancy opens up. This is rare, from my understanding, because the Academies "over appoint" to allow for those that decline the appointment. It may be neither here nor there, and just semantics, but I had never heard of the National Qualified Pool referred to as a "wait list"
     

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