Service Academy Prepatory Schools

Discussion in 'Service Academy Preparatory Schools' started by JT20, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. JT20

    JT20 Member

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    Are candidates lacking academic credentials the only ones that are appointed to SA's prepatory schools? Or can candidates that are fully qualified be given a slot as well?

    (exclude the athletes)
     
  2. philparker

    philparker Member

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    look in the foundation to usna thread. this question is answered already
     
  3. NorthernCalMother

    NorthernCalMother Member

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    To supplement referral to the "foundation to usna thread": If you rec'd a 3Q letter, you're probably not a candidate for a service academy prep school.

    Another answer to your question (Or can candidates that are fully qualified be given a slot as well?) is "sort of." There was a poster on this site - a female, I think - who felt as if she rec'd NAPS because she wasn't physically fit, though she was a competitive candidate academically. So apparently she wasn't fully qualified in terms of PT.

    You can read elsewhere that the SA's prep schools (not to be confused w/ the private and foundation schools) are primarily intended for (a) prior enlisted (b) athletic recruits (c) under-represented minorities, and (d) applicants who have something the Academy likes, but aren't quite academically competitive in terms of test scores OR GPA .

    This question often invites input from the racially-rabid posters, but I'd like to speak for group (d), since that's where my white male Midshipman fell. The academic question of "fully qualified" varies each year, since the norm moves w/ the applicant pool. As I've understood it, applicants who are "rejected" from USNA candidacy are put in a pool to be considered for prep school. Then it becomes a question of what the candidate brings to the party. Only a couple hundred are offered that extra year on the Navy's dime. My son (and I) believe he was offered NAPS because, while he had a great app in terms of GPA from a competitive school, leadership, and EC's, his test scores weren't quite where USNA likes them. He also had a great BGO interview (w/ an awesome BGO), and wrote a fine essay.

    If you search this thread, you'll find a parents who are outraged that their 3Q'd kids were "more qualified" than kids who were offered SA prep schools. The Academies seem to know what they're doing. My former-NAPSter will graduate in May in the top 15% of his class, already in grad school via the VGEP program, lots of leadership @ USNA, etc. Plenty of h.s. valedictorians @ USNA and perfect SAT Mid's weren't as fortunate.

    I hope this helps answer your question.
     
  4. JaronSwinburn

    JaronSwinburn Member

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    There are a lot of supportive moms on this site
     
  5. USNAhopeful~2015

    USNAhopeful~2015 Member

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    After a long app process and being a bit of a nerd about this stuff, here's what I think I've learned.

    I was 3 Q'd with a nom to both USNA and USAFA. However, I was not 'competitive'. Because I was triple Q'd with a nom, that seemed to eliminate me from the specific academy prep schools(like NAPS or AF prep). At least that was my impression. So I was "too good" for prep schools but not good enough for an appointment. That's where the Foundations step in. I'm a sponsored prep to a military prep school. Which is amazing and I'm super excited for that. Take this with a grain of salt since I'm still in the workings of the appointment process for the c/o 2016... but I observed this at least. Best of luck to you!
     
  6. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    Great post.

    Many don't realizethat the minimially scholastic qualification is, as you say, varies each year.Only the top 2000 or so will be scholastically qualified.

    The young lady you mention above brings up a sixth category, unadvertised since it really does not apply to the vast majority of the candidates. USNA will give sons and daughters of deceased/disabled veterans every chance to attend.
     
  7. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    A great "dated but still accurate" reference for this is:

    http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/milpersman/1000/1500Training/Documents/1531-010.pdf

    If you do the digging in the 10 U.S.C. (and it's a LOT of digging)...you'll find this category applies at each SA. And Mongo is correct; VERY few folks know of it.

    The one qualifier is that the veteran "...must have been killed in action or died of, or have a service-connected disability rated at not less than 100 percent resulting from, wounds or injuries received or diseases contracted in, or preexisting injury of disease aggravated by active service. "

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  8. cabarle

    cabarle Parent

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    Steve, I am one of those 100% Service-connected Veterans. I'm confused about your post because the nomination is for the USNA, not NAPS. I understand a nomination is not required for NAPS. Incidentally, my daughter was accepted into NAPS and she was not a recruited athlete. :thumb:

    I've read elsewhere that a veteran being rated 100% is a consideration for the son/daughter to attend NAPS. I could not find a Navy or DoD regulation that states this. Perhaps this is one of those unspoken discussions for the NAPS board?
     
  9. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    To get into USNA, one must be qualified. Often those qualifications might require an extra year of preparatory work. The old adage that "the Navy takes care of its own" certainly holds true here. Yes, it is in the US Code, but more importantly, it is an "unwritten" consideration for the Admissions Board. Marginally or not-quite-qualified sons and daughters of 100% service-connected veterans, rather than being rejected, might be offered NAPS. There have been members of this forum who fell into this category as did the well publicized case of the son of Senator McCain. As a BGO, I have also seen a few myself. I actually have such a candidate entering NAPS this summer so your daughter will not be alone.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2011

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