Should I tell AROTC?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by orlandon10, Oct 13, 2014.

  1. orlandon10

    orlandon10 New Member

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    Quick question,
    I was originally offered the Commander's scholarship for Air Force ROTC at my college in California, but it was later revoked after I was disqualified through my DODMERB exam due to a past history of asthma (a waiver was not granted).
    I no longer have asthma, I had it up until age 15 (which is when I stopped taking medication), but I obviously have to respect their decision.
    In the end, the Air Force ROTC recruiter ended up telling me that I should try the Army ROTC to try my luck.

    Over a year later, I am well on my way to joining the Army ROTC program, but I have not told anyone there about my past history of asthma or involvement with the AFROTC program. I plan on completely denying any history of asthma, and the chances of them finding out that I was SUPPOSED to go into the Air Force ROTC is very slim.

    But the question I have is: during my DODMERB for the Army ROTC, will they try to use my old one? Or will they let me do a completely new one? Will they see that I had asthma and try to DQ me again, this time from Army? Or will I be able to slip through undetected?
    Like I said, I no longer have it; it's just an issue of past asthma.
     
  2. BAMA ROTC

    BAMA ROTC Member

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    It will come up when you start your DODMERB.
     
  3. orlandon10

    orlandon10 New Member

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    Based off your experience, should I bring it up now with the Major in charge of recruiting me into the AROTC program, or should I just wait for it to be brought up in the DODMERB?

    Keep in mind that he has not asked me if I have had any prior ROTC experience or if I have anything that might DQ me.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2014
  4. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Even if you fill out a new Dodmerb Medical History form, there will be a box to check for History of Asthma. Per Dodmerb if you have were diagnosed with Asthma and prescribed medication past the age of 13, you do not meet the standard.

    If you elect to not check the box realize that all of this is in your medical records, if you somehow make it through this process the Army will find out eventually. By not disclosing the Asthma on the Medical History Form you are in essence lying on a Government Form. This will not end well for you if you choose this path, think Federal Offense, Court Martial, loss of commission, and discharge, not to mention a Federal Record that will follow your for ever.

    Omitting information because you were not asked won't be much of a defense.

    You need to tell the AROTC Recruiting Officer about both your Asthma and your application with the AF so they can get out in front of it now and offer you the correct advice based on all the information.

    Don't mess around with trying to pull one over on the military, they are not very forgiving.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    When did you take the exam?

    DoDMERB is valid for two years. If you took it December 15, 2012, than they will use that exact same exam until December 16, 2014. IOWS AROTC is going to know as soon as they request the exam.

    As others have stated, you will have to acknowledge it no matter what

    DoDMERB DQs commissioning source waives.

    Hiding it only hurts you impo. The Army is not the AF and impo you will get DQd again because it occurred after the age of 13. That is the reg. Telling them now may assist in the waiver process if they know why?
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2014
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1 to jcleppe. Additionally I would add that DoDMERB will always disqualify here given your situation, at least as I understand it. What you're shooting for here is the waiver. Also, check old threads searching for spirometry (I think) as to steps you might take on your own.
     
  7. sheriff3

    sheriff3 Member

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    Ok, let’s say you make it through all the way to the end then AROTC finds out you lied ( by omission) about your medical history. Are you prepared to write a check for $100K or more to pay them back for your education? Are you prepared to be made to enlist instead of paying them back? Officers are held to a higher standard. My DS's roommate is likely going to be disenrolled for an integrity issue that most would view as very minor compared to what you are considering. My advice is tell the truth up front and seek the waiver if DQ'd.
     
  8. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    Pure and simple....YES, you should tell them and be up front about the issue. When you go through the DoDMERB process, you should answer honestly as you are swearing to do when you sign your name on the form.

    Be a military officer is all about Honor and Integrity. That includes telling the truth and doing the right thing when it's not the easiest way out. Many people, including most politicians and for sure the current Commander in Chief, have long lost their way and take the easy way out instead of doing what's right and making the difficult decision. Don't be one of them...
     
  9. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Following the DQ, were you asked to take any followup bronchial stress test? If you did and failed the test, then I would think your prospects are not favorable.

    However, if you didn't take any such followup test, you should have hope. Have you been able to participate in athletic activities without any sign of asthma? You said you stopped taking the medication at 15. Was this on your own, or is there a doctor's diagnosis that states you are free from the condition? If there is such a report, did you submit it to DODMERB the first time you applied? If not, get a letter from the doctor indicating that while you had it up to age X he or she determined you no longer have it and can participate in athletic activities without breathing problems.

    As others have said, failing to mention your previous asthma would hurt you sooner or later and terminate your military career.
     
  10. parentalunit2

    parentalunit2 Parent

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    Your question: “Will I be able to slip through undetected?”

    The correct answer: “Being a military officer is all about Honor and Integrity.”
     
  11. VMI82

    VMI82 Room 131

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    sent you a Pvt Message. hope it helps.
     
  12. Armydad88

    Armydad88 Member

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    Stay in front of it

    And tell them now.
     
  13. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Pretty consistent advice here. I agree.

    It is in your best interest to "stay in front of it." Don't lie or mislead on your paperwork.

    Good luck
     
  14. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    Let me also add...there are times when I'm personally not a fan of how strict DoDMERB can be. I agree that "the system" goes too far in some instances and prevents excellent candidates from pursuing their dreams and goals.

    But to make you feel a little bit better....my daughter's boyfriend in college was in AFROTC his freshman year but developed a medical condition that the AF would not agree to a waiver on. Due to the high cost of tuition, he also dropped out of school. He took a year off of school to earn money for school and came back. He started from scratch as a freshman and was accepted into the AROTC program pending a waiver. It took almost (6) months but the waiver was granted and the young man will commission next May. Good luck to you...

    * I don't know what his medical issue was but I can tell you he was (and is) a nursing major.
     
  15. mbitr

    mbitr Member

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    Please do us all a favor and reconsider a career in business, or perhaps grad school? Maybe Seminary? I will not lie, something something something, nor tolerate those who do.

    There's something called a REDD report, which you may or may not generate a history for depending on how far along you got with AFROTC. Either way, you will fill out a whole host of paperwork asking you about past scholarship offers, enlistment/ROTC history, plus all the medical mucketymuck. I encourage you to do the right thing. I've known a couple soldiers who had a past history of asthma, lied about, and had it flare up at some point. It did not end well for any of them when Uncle Sugar found out they had been dishonest. Apply for the waiver. If you don't get it, it's no fault of your own. Merely an accident of birth. Lie about it, and the consequences are entirely your fault.
     
  16. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    I wonder under what circumstances it's a good idea to begin a relationship with a lie?
     
  17. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    This might help.
    http://goldenknightbattalion.wordpress.com/2011/03/16/dodmerb-part-1-open-up-and-say-ahhhh/

    It's a three part blog post. If you open up the DODMERB reg (linked in the post) you'll see that diagnosis of asthma after the age of 13 is a DQ. So, if you were diagnosed with asthma after the age of 13 you will be DQ, that simple. So, then it falls on Air Force or Army to waive that DQ. You can open the Army Reg and see how they feel about waiving it.

    Bottom line is if you are not taking any medication and have no limitations or symptoms then Army will most likely send you for a Pulmonary Functions Test. If you pass, chances are you will get a waiver. Of course as the Army draws down and missions are reduced, you may not get the waiver.

    One final thing. There is a DQ called failure to disclose. I have had a number of applicants/Cadets have to explain why something from a previous physical wasn't on their present one, or why their MEPS didn't match their DODMERB. Some could explain it, and some were sent on their way.
     

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