Someone please explain...

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by mom3boys, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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  2. MorganC

    MorganC Prospective

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    Interesting. I'd love to know
     
  3. tallbutshort

    tallbutshort Member

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    Straight out of the article: "But he had to serve a minimum 24-month commitment just to apply for early release from the Air Force"
     
  4. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    If an athlete gets a "Once in a lifetime" opportunity; such as being drafter to the NFL; instead of the traditional 5 year commitment, they can do a 2 year commitment on active duty, then a set amount in the reserves. It's not just been for football players either. The military gets their money's worth out of the individual in 2 ways. Time serving in the reserves, as well them being a recruiting tool. As much as many might want to say that that is not necessary, the truth is, our young people are still very much impressed by sports figures, actors, pop stars, etc... And such an individual as a graduated cadet, does make for a very good recruiting tool. Both for officer and enlisted. And there are names from all branches of the service that have had such opportunities. David Robinson of the NBA went to Annapolis. Point is, these individuals, which are VERY VERY RARE CIRCUMSTANCES, do make up their commitment. 2 years active duty, then a set amount in the reserves.

    And for what it's worth, it's not one of those: "Hey, I want to go to the NFL, NBA, etc..." We're talking about a team that invited an individual that a team was impressed enough to invite to their summer camp (After graduation); check them out; if they still want them, sign a pseudo contract that says the team will wait 2 years until the active duty commitment is over. Then, they will be auditioned again in 2 years (Which is what Chad Hall is doing right now), to see if they are still as good as they were 2 years ago. Then, if the team is willing to give them a "Contract", then the military (Already in the loop all this time), may grant the release from active duty and into the reserves.

    FWIW; these rules continually change. It's been this way for a while in the air force. Until recently, the army allowed such once in a lifetime opportunities, to be taken advantage of directly out of the academy. In other words, directly to the reserve with no active duty time. But that changed a couple years ago to be more in line with the other services.

    Also; FWIW; I can't remember the young lady's name, but a few years back, after graduating the academy, she auditioned for "Tops in Blue". Sort of like the air force's "American Idol". While on tour for that, a promoter/record deal/type of opportunity was presented to her. She was allowed to go reserves to take advantage of this once in a lifetime opportunity. It's also been made available to enlisted individuals who were offered some sort of once in a lifetime opportunity partially through their enlistment.

    Again; these opportunities are extremely rare. These aren't individuals who are putting their name into the NFL draft because they want to. These are are individuals where teams, agents, etc... are coming to them and saying: "You don't need to go through the draft... You're one of the best of the best; and we want you". Extremely rare. But it does happen. And these individuals definitely help the military services out with publicity, recruiting, serving 2 years active, and reserve service. I know there's some people who aren't too keen on academy athletics; or even college athletics at all. Many think it's a waste of money and time. But the truth is, athletics brings in a lot of money to a school; even the academies. And once in a while, you get an athlete who happens to be one of the best of the best. Me personally, I think it's a reasonable compromise. The military gets their payback. The military gets an excellent recruiting aid. The individual fulfills their commitment. And the individual gets to fulfill a once in a lifetime opportunity.
     
  5. MorganC

    MorganC Prospective

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    Sounds cool. I totally understand the recruiting side of it. Last year at school some participants in the Army's World Class Athlete Program came and gave a presentation. A lot of kids went and got information about the Army because of it, even though they aren't on track to be "world class athletes."
     
  6. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    Un-drafted free agents are not un-drafted because they are so good, it's usually the other way around - no one in the NFL thinks they are good enough to be drafted. Hall's situation is unique, he was undrafted because of his employment (military) situation.

    But un-drafted free-agents making NFL rosters are quite rare indeed.

    I really hope he makes it, but it's long shot that he will be on the Eagles opening day roster. They simply don't have the roster room to carry him as a 5'8" WR.
     
  7. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    I dont think anyone was actually allowed to take advantage of it though. Caleb Campbell had to serve his two years and is trying to go pro this year too.

    The Army World Class Athlete Program is different. This is for amateur athletes to compete in Nationals and International competitions including the Olympic and Paralympics. If you are selected, you don't have to wait to participate.
     
  8. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    True. But realize too that most academy athlete grads don't put their name into the draft because of their commitment. The are many times approached. Chad definately could have been drafted.
     
  9. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    It is a very controversial DOD policy which allows athletes to serve all but two years of their commitment as a reservest "recruiting" for their particular branch. The Navy does not participate in the program. Here is the SecNav's position on it:
    Obviously the AF thinks differently.
     
  10. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    This may be the feeling today, which is understandable, but the Navy has "participated" in this program in the past. As has all the branches of the military.
     
  11. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    This "program" has changed over the years, has varied by service, and thus may or may not be available to any particular individual.

    In virtually all cases (and there have been few) of which I'm aware, the "talent" is something that emerged at the SA and, as noted, it is really extraordinary talent. Depending on the world situation, the vagaries of the CNO, SecNav, etc. (and same positions for other SAs), the 2-yr commitment may be permitted.

    It upsets a lot of people. But, here's my view (FWIW) -- and there was someone in my class permitted to do the 2-yr thing. I agreed to serve for 5 yrs on active duty. What happens to someone else has no bearing on my agreement with the USN. I was in no hurry to quit the USN after 2 yrs (and stayed beyond my initial obligation).

    The two individuals I know who were able to take advantage of this program have contributed much more to USNA, the USN, the military, and society than many graduates. I have no issues with the program.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2010
  12. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    The only one that I am aware of is David Robinson and his was not a DOD policy but a one-on-one waiver from the SecNav.
     
  13. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    I am not aware of an example where the Coast Guard Academy has participated in this program. Maybe it's the D3 athlete part of it...


    I do see the benefit of this occuring from time to time.


    One of my classmates was drafted by the Chicago Cubs as a pitcher. Still is serving after leaving CGA for a year, he returned. It's hard to make it in MLB...such a deep league.
     
  14. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    As much as I understand how important recruiting is to the Army and funding is to the academies, the current system of recruiting athletes, even though pretty much all civilian colleges do it too, and this interesting story of a 2-year commitment bothers me. It seems to betray what the academies and what the Army is all about :frown:
     
  15. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    My classmate, Napoleon McCallum, is another. Not sure about Kyle Eckel -- but that's another story altogether.:thumbdown:
     
  16. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    Napoleon tried out the summer after graduation while on leave and then served his full commitment prior to returning to the Raiders permanently in 1990.

    Phil McConkey and Roger Staubach also both served their full commitments prior to professional football.

    USNA seems to have developed an affinity for recruiting late-developing baseball pitchers. A couple are bouncing around minor league ball now who quit either after NAPS or youngster year and some others have gone real high in the MLB draft. At least two graduates have petitioned for the ASO (Alternate Service Option) but both were denied.

    David Robinson was denied Unrestricted Line due to his height. That he was unable to serve aboard a ship, hence restricting his promotability, weighed into the decision to release him.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2010
  17. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I stand corrected.:redface:

    For some reason, I thought Nap did less than his 5. Maybe b/c some guy from the '60s sitting next to me in the stadium a couple of years ago (when Nap was being honored for something) was bemoaning the fact that he didn't do his full commitment.:rolleyes: I wish I'd known then that he was wrong and, as Nap's classmate, I should know better. But, as mentioned, I didn't really care either way as it didn't affect what I had committed to.
     
  18. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    The Rest Of The Story

    He did apply for outside employment and it was initaially approved. James Webb, the new SecNav later nixed it. Oakland traded him, probably under the table, to the Chargers, and then got him back after his commitment was up. Bottom line, he was on a gator freighter out of Coronado and played some for the Chargers on the weekends, not to interfere with his military duties. But he did serve his commitment.
     
  19. pjnavy82

    pjnavy82 Member

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    I think I heard he was PQ when he entered as a Plebe then grew 10 or 12 inches while there making him NPQ for most or all line officer jobs, then spent most or all his Active Duty training for the '88(?) Olympics. I think I heard he went to Navy Supply School during his 2-years on active duty as well...

    PJ
     
  20. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    Not true.

    Robinson was 6' 8" and had to get a waiver when he entered, and only grew 3 inches to graduate at 6' 11".

    He was not highly recruited, he only played one year of high school basketball.

    He went to the USNA to become an officer, not to play ball. He came from a Navy family in Manassas VA, his father retired as a Senior Chief.
     

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