Spec Ops Branch Difference

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by Felix Rosa, Feb 21, 2016.

  1. Felix Rosa

    Felix Rosa #Dream#Future#Success

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    Hi, I was just wondering what brach or branches hold up more Spec Op opportunities for officers? My dream is to be a Green Beret 18A. But I'm also curious about other Spec Ops oportunities in the military. Maybe this can help others who are looking into the SA's and wanting to be SEAL's or PJ's. I've also been told that officers rarely get to "kick down doors" how true is this? Would an 18A be able to go out on missions wt his ODA, or will he be most occupied only on mannagement, planning, etc.
     
  2. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    I'm not a military career counselor, but I can tell you it's not likely officers will be kicking down doors and shooting bad guys in the face.

    No need to post your question on multiple threads.
     
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  3. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    There are opportunities for special operations officers to get out in the field, but as they progress their duties will fall more in line with management, organization, and leadership, rather than individual missions.
     
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  4. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    That correctly sums it up. They build teams, lead, plan and train and train. The one thing about any time in these units is that you are very marketable to many agencies afterward. They are very sought after. From someone starting out in college or West Point this is something that is way out there in the future. You can work towards this by getting good grades and continuously maintaining high standards and results for yourself. You have to take care of business for the next 9 years. Four years of college, three years as an officer, Selection and then maybe two more years of training. It can end anytime along the way. It is great to dream about but take care of your business immediately in front of you. If you do that you will see along the way that this and many other opportunities will open for you.
     
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  5. falconfamily

    falconfamily Member

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    If you are talking about being an 18A, you will lead an ODA and be in the field. Unlike enlisted, officers do not specialize in something like communications or medical, so don't expect to be the one to kick the door down, though you might often be the first one off the ramp on a mission.

    Of all the Spec Ops, Army Special Forces has one of the longer training cycles. This is primarily due to the language requirement. If your desire is to be part of a direct action, there are other Spec Op units. If your desire is to fight graduate level warfare being an 18A is the realization of that. Try looking up a program on the NRA network - "The Calling", it is a great primer of what USASF does and Jason Amerine is an excellent example of an Special Forces officer.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  6. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    There is a plethora of material available to answer your question, both on here and the broader Internet. I recommend some judicious searches.
     
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  7. ArmyMom11

    ArmyMom11 Member

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    I was enlisted but in special ops. While deployed, I was out in the field but the officers were back at camp doing higher-level planning. That said, I loved my job and if I could get a redo, I'd still go special ops.
     
  8. Jcc123

    Jcc123 Member

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    @ArmyMom11 - could you elaborate on your special ops experience, as far as your MOS, etc? I'm assuming MISO, but would be curious to see what level of involvement you saw as a female prior to the opening up of all MOSs.
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    This is true of nearly every combat arms MOS in every branch. A fact of life with the exception or air (at least I think so).
     
  10. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    But I wanna still kick doors!
     
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  11. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    I am sure you do... save it for the O-Club! ;)
     
  12. ArmyMom11

    ArmyMom11 Member

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    MISO but back in the day, we just called in PSYOP :) My time came to reup just after I had my son (the one going to West Point) and I did not reenlist. We thought one soldier in the family was enough with the increase in deployments. I was actually supposed to go to Bosnia soon after my son was born and that made my decision easier. I missed it though. I loved my job. Even at that time, there were very few females in my MOS. I think in my AIT, there were something like 70 males and only five females. I definitely had some very interesting experiences.
     
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