Special Forces Rotc

Discussion in 'Publicly and Privately Funded Military Colleges' started by Hockeyplayer25, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. Hockeyplayer25

    Hockeyplayer25 New Member

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    Hello. Im new here and i have a few questions. Im thinking about going to an smc. I want to be a green beret one day. I plan on joining army rotc and i have heard of nrotc courses for those who want to be SEALs. I was wondering if there is anything like that for the army rotc that can prepare me for a special forces career.
     
  2. Strength and Honor

    Strength and Honor Member

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    I know Texas A&M has a SEAL Hopeful club (forget the actual name), and I'm sure other SMCs have similar clubs. Someone else can chime in and help you out, but try a forum search as well.
     
  3. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Nope- because you won't be entering as an SF officer - you can't apply for SFAS (SF Assessment and Selection) until you are a 1LT with Plt Leader time in your commissioning branch. So- you won't have to worry about that in college. There are some pretty good Army schools out there that currently are open to ROTC cadets that would be pretty useful to you in your quest for SF later on. For example I know one VMI cadet who graduated from the SF Combat Dive School (in Key West I think) last summer and he has started a prep program for that specific course. Bottom line though- your worries about SF are for a little later in your career. Valid goal though- you probably could most help yourself get ready for SF by looking at the list of shortage languages and take one of them in School. SF really isn't mostly a direct action world- thaey've kind of morphed due to the demands of Afghanistan , but I believe they are moving back to the FID/ Security Assistance role and leaving the door kicking mission mostly to other SOF units- so Language, communication, leadership and training skills will be at a premium for an SF officer.
     
  4. Lawman32RPD

    Lawman32RPD Member

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    :thumb:
     
  5. Jcc123

    Jcc123 Member

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    CDQC is technically no longer open to cadets, although that may change in the future.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2014
  6. NAS

    NAS Banned

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    Hockeyplayer25,
    If you decide to go to VMI and pursue an Army commission, you'll find a good deal of the instructors will have SF experience and will be able to guide you on the way. If you end up changing your mind and going into the Navy or Air Force, you'll also find the special operations from all branches are loaded with VMI grads. But I'd add that you need to make sure you focus on your grades and learning as much as possible Rat year… good luck.:thumb:
     
  7. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    Really good advice here. It would be years from now. Keep the dream alive and work towards it. Prepare now by PTing everyday. Excel when in school, seek mentors and build relationships/friendships in college and ROTC. Focus always on the next objective. A lot will happen between then and now. You may have different motivations in 6 years. Be aware that some doors may close and others will open. Most of all enjoy the ride every day.

    Best Wishes
     
  8. payitforward

    payitforward Member

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    From what I've heard, the posts above all seem like good advice. Your GPA will play a big role in the opportunities available to you, as will your APFT scores. You'll need to stand out of the crowd in many ways.

    I'll add to the VMI posts that another SMC, University of North Georgia, focuses on Army training in a no-nonsense military school environment that mimics the regular Army. (You will interact on a regular basis with civilians, learning how to advance your agenda within civilian politics, which, by the way, is how the real world Army and SF must operate too.)

    UNG has many cadets who are members of the National Guard, and many who are prior service with prior deployments. The specialty training units (which have try-outs) include The Aggressor Platoon and Mountain Order of Colombo, both of which provide rigorous and challenging training opportunities in small unit, light infantry and Ranger tactics. Colombo adds intense training in mountaineering, fixed installations, terrain navigation, hand-to-hand combat and survival tactics. Exceptional members of Colombo have the opportunity to attend the U.S. Army Mountain Warfare School while cadets at UNG. Aggressor and Colombo cadets routinely are leaders of the Corps of Cadets, score high at LDAC, and are academically, mentally and physically ready for branching Infantry or Field Artillery. If you manage to branch Infantry, you will be sent to Ranger School. As I understand it (and I could be wrong), if you are still a stand out at Ranger School, and are still interested in SF, that's the point when you'll be making those connections and using your political and time management skills in addition to your physical and mental experience to go for any of those SF jobs.

    UNG also has an intense strategic language program, offering immersion classes in Russian, Korean, Arabic and Chinese with extensive study abroad opportunities as part of the degree.

    But I will stress: none of this at UNG is easy by any stretch of the imagination. It is hard to get stellar grades in tough language classes while also participating in mentally, emotionally and physically challenging Aggressors or Colombo and establishing yourself as a leader in the Corps. Time management, stress management, and political management is designed to be part of the overall experience. I think that's why successful graduates of the program go on to successful Army careers.

    It's a highly competitive environment, but then again, so is SF. If that's what you want, wrap your brain around what it really means to be physically, academically, mentally and emotionally challenged.
     
  9. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    There are great clubs at most schools where you can get a little bit of extra training. Norwich had several including Ranger Challenge. When DS's Ranger Challenge team won the Brigade they got to go to the Sandhurst Competition at West Point. They were given a lot of extra training including 16,000 round of ammo to spend 8 hours at the firing range to prepare. The ruck marching in the Vermont mountains and team skills are what really helped out DS in the long run. There will be opportunities in all colleges for that. I know Jcleppe's son(non SMC) also went to Sandhurst. These clubs are available in most colleges.

    What you need most is developing leadership to be an officer let alone a SF Officer. Work on planning, Cadre/PMS relationships, managment and people skills in college. Take the academic/langauge courses that could help. The opportunites for Army Training schools like Airborne may come up or not. As a 2nd LT if you need the schools they will send you after graduation. Work hard(GPA, PT, BT relationships) in college to get you there.

    One step at a time.
     
  10. Jcc123

    Jcc123 Member

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    +1 Norwichdad. DS has been to Sandhurst and graduated from dive school, and intends to drop a packet for SF as soon as he's a 1LT (p), but even he is aware that all the hooah training in the world won't make you suited for SF if you don't have the intelligence and people skills required. Use your college years to obtain what training you can, sure, but also to mature and develop as an individual and a leader. Your career will benefit regardless of the path you choose.
     
  11. SAG

    SAG Member

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    Still has openings this year as VMI has been awarded at least 2 slots. The cadets are in the process of getting their physicals now for the summer class in Key West.
     
  12. glen

    glen Member

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    Special Forces ROTC -

    I would generally agree with Bruno on this subject. Best way to make yourself eligible for selection to a special warfare school is to have the best GPA and scores in your qualification training end of Junior and in your Senior 1st semester.

    But there are ways to familiarize yourself for Ranger, Airborne and other elite Army programs while a Cadet. If you qualify for an Army scholarship program for example, you almost certainly will have the opportunity to attend Airborne, Air Assault and Mountain Warfare training schools. And most SMCs have special Clubs designed to familiarize Cadets with Special Warfare unites. At The Citadel there is the Cordel Airborne Ranger Club which conducts a number of training excercises and helps Cadets with additional fitness work outs so they are familiar with Ranger and Airborne Schools.
     

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