Sponsorship from other Country?

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by 34KING18, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. 34KING18

    34KING18 Member

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    Hey guys. I don't know if you guys will know the answer to this question but here I go (This question is totally out of curiosity). I have dual citizenship with the USA and a European nation. How would you go along getting sponsored by a European nation to attend the USCGA or really any service academy? I was born in the USA but have citizenship with the European Nation also.
     
  2. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    You would have to ask that country. Foreign countries that are allowed to send their citizens to any service academy pay for the cadet/midshipman's tuition and training.
     
  3. AuxNoob

    AuxNoob CGA Admissions Partner

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    What Spud said. I believe you apply through the foreign embassy of your country, or the US Embassy in the country which you wish to represent. Caveat 1, CGA may have these limited to certain countries, which are solicited through our State Department. Caveat 2, you would almost certainly have to renounce your dual citizenship. I'm a little shaky on that, but it would behoove you to check into both of those things very carefully to make an informed decision.
     
  4. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    And, based on my knowledge of foreign midshipmen at USNA, they receive their degree from USNA and their commission in their home country's service. They then complete their service obligation as required by that country in either uniformed or government service. The service academies in your other country of record would also be a place to get information. Many times the foreign midshipmen complete a year at the home country service academy, then start the four years at the U.S. Academy. That year at the home country academy helps determine if the candidate is suitable to represent his/her country. Frequently the spots at U.S. Service Academies are part of a State Department agreement as an investment in long-term relationships.
     

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