Test Pilot?

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by Farmer5, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. Farmer5

    Farmer5 New Member

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    Hey everyone,

    Say for example I got admitted to the AFA next year, what would the steps be and how hard would it be to become a test pilot after graduation? Any input will be helpful, thank you:smile:
     
  2. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    How "hard" is it?

    It's a HIGHLY selective school...and you MUST have an engineering or technical degree. If you don't, you're not even eligible to apply.

    Aside from that...did I mention it's HIGHLY selective?

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    As flieger stated it is highly competitive, but if I get your post correct you are a jr. in hs. right now.

    Now let's play the wheel of fortune.

    Hurdle 1.
    ~~~ AFA or at least AFROTC. What is the rate @15% for all those that open up a PCQ file? 25% of those that enter do not graduate

    Hurdle 2
    ~~~ Get UPT, best chances as an AFA cadet.

    Hurdle 3
    ~~~ Graduate UPT. 25% will bust UPT. IFS is now waiverable, but before they did that, 25% busted IFS, never went to UPT. Typically only 25% will get fighters.

    Hurdle 4
    ~~~ Become the shining star at your OP base and get Wing support.

    Hurdle 5
    ~~~ Get selected for TPS

    That is your next 10 yrs., at least regarding hurdles. As you can see when you start doing the math, the answer is exactly what fliegler stated.

    HIGHLY selective
     
  4. FlyingFuzz

    FlyingFuzz Member

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    Do they take any heavy pilots for TPS or is it strictly fighter pilots? I'd imagine that fighter experience would play a big role in upset recovery skills but I'm just curious.
     
  5. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    Oh no...you'd be amazed...you don't need to be a fighter pilot to understand upset recovery skills. ALL pilots are taught this; in a heavy you have to be much more cautious as the window for recovery is small (g-force limits and other variables).

    To the original question, no, you don't have to be a fighter pilot for TPS...and that makes sense. It wouldn't really make sense to have an F-22 pilot doing flight test on the next tanker or transport aircraft, anymore than it would make sense to have a C-17 pilot being the test pilot for the newest F-35 variant.
    (But you will learn how to test BOTH types as a student)

    You'll find ALL types in a TPS class, including non-pilots!

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  6. FlyingFuzz

    FlyingFuzz Member

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    Thanks for the info Flieger.
     
  7. Farmer5

    Farmer5 New Member

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    Thank you Flieger and Pima. I'll do whatever it takes to become part of that highly selective group.
     

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