% that pass the APRT

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Vista123, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    My Navy Mid recently told us the percentage of initial passing rate of the PRT at USNA. I was surprised at how low (relatively) that percentage was. Does anyone know what the initial passing percentage of the APRT for AROTC is?


    ...just idle curiosity....
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I doubt anyone knows that number, but a low % would not shock me at all.

    Many cadets that posted out the door stats may have received those numbers because the administrator did not care about the form, or did not follow the test to the letter regarding the rest times.

    DS was an AFROTC PT leader and he would tell stories of how many cadets were shocked when they were screamed at during PT for form. They just assumed they were doing it correctly, meanwhile they wasted time and energy on a sit up or push up that didn't count.

    Additionally, many cadets spend the summer hanging with friends. They are lax on working out, which comes back to bite them.

    As I stated this shouldn't be a shock, especially on the ROTC forums because every year there is a thread regarding how many FAILED the PFT 1st shot out.
     
  3. sheriff3

    sheriff3 Member

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    I was talking to one my wife's coworkers on Sunday. He is a JROTC instructor and retired PMS for a small college in Colorado. He said the #1 factor in a cadet not getting contracted was failure of the AFPT! Several scholarships annually went unused due to this. Take note future cadets. There is a reason cadet command references a youtube link that shows proper form when you are offered your scholarship . I cannot stress enough how important it is for you to show up on your first day ready to rock the AFPT. Good luck to you all.:thumb:
     
  4. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    APFT failure

    DS reports approx. 30% of cadets fail first APFT.
     
  5. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    Note, a failing PRT score at USNA is a "Good" by fleet standards (which the NROTC program uses).

    Not making any excuses for '18; the first PRT should be one of the better ones if you took PEP seriously.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2014
  6. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

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    I have to say I am surprised by the amount of kids who are posting on the freshmen site at my son's college with, "anyone in as bad a shape as me?" comments. My son has been working hard all summer to lose weight (he'll never hit the weight requirement for his height with his stocky build but he's pretty close) and today he cut 42 seconds off his 2 mile time and was pumped!

    He's not going to ace it out the door, but he certainly won't embarrass himself either. I don't get some of these kids not wanting to make a good first impression.
     
  7. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    Precisely why I pay no attention to the PT stats posted on these boards. It's shocking how many come in and think that what Coach Joe at High School X counted is whats gonna fly in the big leagues.

    My advice: Practice good form over number of reps every time. All you need on the first test is 42 pushups, 53 sit-ups, and a 15:54 minute 2-mile. That's great that you're busting out a 300 APFT on Day-1, but I've already forgotten your name, face, and score by Day 2. I'm not discouraging anyone kicking *** on the APFT, that should be the goal (and it was mine too), but know you still have much to improve upon in many other areas other than physical fitness.

    Edit: I'm sure it would've been misinterpreted. Just to clarify. Show up, do your best, but don't be surprised when you get a score that may not be as high as you were expecting, and don't think a high score gives you permission to slack off in other areas.
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I am with you -Bull-

    I pay little heed to the scores posted because when I see insane scores, I wonder if the form or test was done to the standards/procedures used at any ROTC unit (A/AF/NROTC)

    Our DS's scores actually went up because during the summer he repeated the test weekly. His Dad was an O5, and would call him out on form, aka not count the perfect sit up or push up. He also learned that once you hit max, don't push it any further, instead use that time to let your body rest for the next section.
    ~ His Dad worked out with him, and would take it even further by adding in butterfly kicks. He also ran in all weather conditions. He would run at 6 a.m. after going to bed at 1. He would run in NC at 5 p.m. 95 degrees and 90% humidity. He would run in light rain.

    The main reason why he continued working out over the summer, was Dad was also an AFROTC grad. He turned to DS and said the 1st few weeks they will be screaming your last name. You don't want them the ability to place a name with a face because they were screaming it constantly during PT! You don't want to put a negative spotlight on you immediately.
    ~ Not knowing your last name or face the first few weeks can be a blessing.:wink:

    Like you said there are other areas where they will put a face and name together, but PT is one aspect you can control. Show up and bust, the face and name is there. Show up with the belief that you were the sheeaatt in JROTC and try to impress by saying: When I was the CWC at JROTC we did it this way, or I received 169 ribbons, will also not serve you well.
    ~ If you were in JROTC, great, but don't enter thinking you will have an edge, or respect. It can bite you faster than you will ever be able to imagine. Tick off the POC, and he/she will tell other POCs while they hang out in the cadet lounge.
    ~~ Hey guys, you gotta hear this one...So I am talking to the flight, and this cadet opens their mouth about JROTC and says well, in JROTC we did ....
    ~ Now every POC will know your name, including the top ranking Cadet. Who will they support, the cadet that has been in the unit for 2/3/4 years or the cadet that just joined and believes JROTC = ROTC regarding training?
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2014
  9. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    I agree with all of this. I was worried my post would come off as me implying that it wasn't worth shooting for a max score, which a max score should definitely be the goal. I mainly was shooting to hit home that physical fitness is a large part of how you will be evaluated, but is far from being the only part. And the upperclassmen will form their impression of you over more than one day, though day one is huge. When I was the cadet brigade commander last year, I gathered opinions about certain new cadets over the first few days, but honestly forgot about those individuals after a week or so (that's me looking at over 200+ cadets though). The upperclassmen that interact with freshman on a daily basis will share their thoughts with the entire upperclass.

    It's great that people are/were in JROTC, hell I did it (and my Senior ROTC classmates never knew until almost the end of my first year because I never cared enough to share). But don't flaunt anything. Rather it be an internship, cool summer job, daddy's job and who he knows, JROTC experience, CAP, or whatever. Everyone of those things are great, but they are the past. The future begins day 1 you step on campus and the slate is clean. Nobody knows you, nobody cares where you've been or what you've done. Use all of your past experiences (JROTC, CAP, yada, yada, etc.) as building blocks for you to build off of. And for the love of all things good, nobody cares about what you care to share from basic training. Basic training makes privates, ROTC makes officers.
     

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