The Long Blue Line

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SamAca10, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    For the pure sake of debate, does the "Long Blue Line" more appropriately belong to the USCGA or USAFA, because both schools use it.
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    A good question. USCGA is far older than USAFA, but the Coast Guard has worn blue for a slightly shorter time (called Bender Blues after the Commandant that switched from the uniforms similar to Navy).

    The line is longer at USCGA....but I would be interested to know how many total graduates have come from USAFA.
     
  3. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    516
    42,880 including the Class of 2011.

    Stealth_81
     
  4. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    607
    Or maybe both schools could stop copying from West Point, as the "Long Blue Line" was taken from USMA's much longer Long Gray Line moniker for the Corps and grads.

    Oh well...imitation is the sincerest form of flattery :thumb:
     
  5. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    Long what line? Oh, it's "gray" always thought it was something else. I always thought West Point just copied VMI... interesting. :wink:
     
  6. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    Just read Adm. Bender's bio. Quite impressive. Especially because he was an aviator that became the CO of the 311-foot cutter Bering Straight as a captain. I thought that aviators didn't go afloat once pinning on their wings...
     
  7. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    607
    Just proves that aviators can be sailors, but sailors can't be aviators. :wink:
     
  8. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    343
    Tell that to Fleet Admiral Billy Halsey (RIP). :wink:

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  9. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    Probably got bored flying and wanted a hair cut. Or maybe he just felt guilty. :eek:
     
  10. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,239
    Likes Received:
    272
    Police Officers?
     
  11. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    343
    Actually he was a "sailor" until offered the command of a carrier and group...BUT...he was told he had to be "aviation qualified" which meant "observer."

    He felt if he was going to command aviators, then he better be one himself. SO at the ripe old age of 52 (still the oldest in USN history) he went through pilot training in the navy and qualified as a carrier pilot.

    I've found him to be a fascinating leadership exemplar in my studies.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  12. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    I also dug this up when searching on the internet:

    source: http://www.uscg.mil/pacarea/cgcmellon/history2.asp

    This implies that there have been other aviators to command WHEC's. My guess is that, due to the limited billets in aviation at the senior level, These aviators sought command in other communities.

    I wonder if this still occurs.
     
  13. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    I can't think of ANY aviators qualified to be an operations officer, much less a commanding officer of a cutter.


    No, I would say it does not occur anymore....certainly not with a seasoned pilot.
     
  14. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yeah that's what I'd think. And we have so many more officers now it wouldn't seem right for a pilot to get that command when there are so many more qualified afloat types.
     
  15. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    Not just more qualified, but the fact that an airdale isn't at all qualified.

    To add onto that general fact, cuttermen and airdales aren't the best buddies. I don't see many qualified cuttermen appreciating an airdale onboard any longer than an AVDET has to be. A pilot hasn't earned his "lumps" like a cutterman has at sea. 30 ft. seas look much smaller 500 ft. in the air.
     
  16. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,239
    Likes Received:
    272
    Until they have to land on that deck moving in 30ft seas!
     
  17. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    True....and that's when the chumming begins.
     
  18. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    607

    Ever been at the controls of "feet wet" aircraft on a zero-illum night with a high sea state and no visible horizon? Try it sometime. When you're trying to maintain a steady 30 feet AWL and the waves try to grab you the seat gets uncomfortable because you've puckered so hard the cushion is up your...

    And then you get to land on a pitching deck.
     
  19. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    When they're out there for 90 days straight in those seas on a ship that's maybe 5-6 times as long as that helo, let me know. It's the cuttermen who are hanging out below those blades...with a cranial to protect them.

    So no, I've never been hovering over the seas while the ship below me rises and falls 30 feets, but I have been under a helo as I rose and fell, and eventually that helo returned to solid land.


    The "have you evers" only work for people who have "never ever" seen anything like it. Appreciate airdales, but the hardships don't compare.
     
  20. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    607

Share This Page