The Process (specifically choosing your job)

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Forsyth, Apr 12, 2016.

  1. Forsyth

    Forsyth New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I am a freshman in high school (just thought I'd put that out there.)
    So I'm thinking about going to Annapolis but I'm a little fuzzy on the process.
    You see I heard when you go to the recruiter you choose your job in the navy(MC, Diver, etc.)
    But how does that work when going to USNA do you meet with a recruiter after you graduate?

    I'm sorry if the question might sound vague I'm just having trouble conveying my message.
     
  2. time2

    time2 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    265
    Ummmm, good place to start is here:

    http://www.usna.edu/Admissions/index.php

    You don't go to a recruiter if you plan to apply to USNA. It is located in the city of Annapolis, but isn't called that.
     
  3. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,089
    Likes Received:
    2,441
    No, for USNA recruiters will not be involved. Go to the USNA admissions website and become familiar with it. It will walk you through the process. If you become a candidate, you will be assigned a Blue and Gold Officer who can assist with the process also. This website, especially the stickies up top, provide great info. As far as selecting your "job" when you graduate there is a process called service selection. You will list all warfare areas you are qualified for and be notified in November of your senior year what you were selected for.
     
  4. Forsyth

    Forsyth New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you navyhoops that cleared up my question.
     
  5. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,345
    Likes Received:
    1,812
    Concurrently with your research on USNA - and good for you on starting early - if your interest is in serving as a Navy officer, start your research on Navy ROTC programs at college. That's another approach.

    Read, take notes, search some more. Start building a timeline of the major moving parts of a successful campaign, because that's what it is.

    The USNA.edu site - plow through everything you can find.

    Look up "Navy officer careers," but be aware of .mil versus .com sites for accuracy.

    Look for juniors and seniors at your HS who might be going through the application process, or who might have gotten an appointment. Your HS guidance counselor may have more info.

    Browse this forum to see what successful and competitive candidates have in terms of courses, grades, test scores, sports, community involvement, leadership.

    Happy research!
     
    GoNavy2020 likes this.
  6. GoNavy2020

    GoNavy2020 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2015
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    79
    If I may add to Capt MJ's excellent advice:

    You will need a nomination from your state's senators or your congressman to earn an appointment. Find out who your representatives are, if you don't know already, and check their websites. Most outline their nomination process and many will include contact information for a Service Academy coordinator. If you are lucky, your member of Congress may hold a Service Academy Day in spring or fall. These are great forums for meeting midshipmen, alums, Blue and Gold Officers, and the congressman's staffers who will be coordinating the nomination process. At the very least, you will get a sense as to how your congressman does his noms. (All are different.)

    Good luck!
     
  7. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    1,229
    Likes Received:
    131
    All these are great answers to somebody who is just thinking about gathering information - which got me thinking. Can you imagine how difficult this all was before the internet and email? Applying to a service academy was daunting. Gathering information about it, other than the catalog, was nearly impossible. And that's if you could even get your hands on a catalog!

    In my opinion, part of the explanation why retention is so much higher than decades past is because more midshipman know exactly what they're getting into. There were times when people would show up and be completely blindsided by the process; consequently, they get disillusioned very quickly. Nowadays, all the information you want and need is readily available at your fingertips. If you need answers, you can get them quickly. We had to write letters ... and that's assuming you knew who to write.
     

Share This Page