The rollercoaster ride is starting

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Pima, May 25, 2015.

  1. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    So here we are again. Applications for ROTC scholarships will be opening up.

    Good luck, God speed and BUCKLE UP because it can be a long ride before you hear anything.
     
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  2. turtlerunnernc

    turtlerunnernc Member

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    Good luck to all the applicants. It is a stressful time, but try to enjoy the ride.
     
  3. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

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    While it is good to be early with your application...take your time to do a good job and be thorough. Good luck!
     
  4. ginko

    ginko Member

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    Good luck applicants! May be better to get a higher SAT score than make the first board.
     
  5. afrotc16

    afrotc16 Member

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    Just remember, you don't need a scholarship to do ROTC! If you want to do it, pick a school and go ahead! The scholarship is just a bonus. Don't stress too much!
     
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  6. Wilson2020

    Wilson2020 New Member

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    I've been reading this forum for the past year - through all ups and downs of the AROTC hopefuls. Now it's my son's turn to apply. It definitely seems like it will be a long, scary and nerve-wracking experience, so I am so thankful I have all of you to help! I'm sure I'll be on here with many questions for the next many months, but for now... 2 questions:
    1 - I heard the application opens in June...is the first of June?
    2 - For the SAT, the minimum is 920, although I'm sure not many with that score receive a scholarship, but is there a general average that my son should have?

    Thanks!!
     
  7. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

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    Wilson...welcome! When my son applied for the NROTC scholarship, I remember looking at the minimums for tests/GPA and thinking...that's not so hard! Um yeah, only about 17% of the kids who apply get NROTC scholarships. The lesson, ignore the minimums. I would suggest checking out the WP class averages for the test scores and tell your son to aim for those ... at the minimum. ;)

    Good luck!
     
  8. Wilson2020

    Wilson2020 New Member

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    Thanks Navymom! And where would I find these WP class averages? I'm afraid his SAT score is a bit low, however he does have a lot of other things going for him, so hopefully not TOO much weight is given to the SAT scores.

    Last month we had a meeting with the ROO at one of the schools he's very interested in and the ROO indicated how much more difficult it was becoming to get the national scholarship, but that he was having very good success at getting 3 or 3 1/2 year scholarships for his cadets once they enroll at the school. Anyone have any experience in doing that way? I remember a post a few months ago after this current year's group of winners (and non-winners) from the 3rd board was released. Some of the posters of the non-winners said they were being contacted by schools that said they would have a very good chance of getting school-based scholarships. Do you think that is the way it's going now - more school-based awards being given rather than national scholarships?
     
  9. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

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    Class profile is here: http://www.usma.edu/admissions/sitepages/class profiles.aspx
    And the SAT is a BIG part of the application. Have your son retake the SAT as many times as he can....and also try the ACT as some students have better luck with that test.

    As far as school based scholarships, yes, there seems to be a trend towards this but I don't have any hard facts. Just discussions here on the boards about it.
     
  10. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    You'll find that most cadets that will be in your DS' (DD?) battalion will not have scholarships. There are many ways to commission and there are plenty of stories on this forum and other places of what seem to be can't miss candidates washing out. By all means apply for the national scholarship, but enrolling in AROTC and making a good impression with fitness, grades and activities may becoming a more common path.
     
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  11. DJA

    DJA Member

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    From http://ung.edu/military-college-adm...ips-and-grants/army-rotc-scholarship-faqs.php

    Also, remember the 4 year ROTC scholarships have even more competitive standards than this 27 on the ACT referenced below. WP's average ACT score for the class of 2018 was 28. So, he might want to aim even higher than WP for a 4 year scholarship and try to get a 29 or higher. It never hurts to aim as high as you can because my DS now has a full ride (tuition scholarships from his chosen school, room and board, books, fees, etc.) I heard this year there were only 550 or so 4 year scholarships awarded. Good luck to your son and all candidates!

    Army ROTC Scholarships FAQs
    [​IMG]

    Q: What are my chances of getting the Army ROTC Scholarship?
    A: It depends. Army Cadet Command looks at three areas of performance in what they term Scholar/Athlete/Leader (SAL) criteria. Scholar criteria is determined from your high school grades and SAT or ACT scores. The higher your grades and scores, the better your chances. Athlete criteria is determined by your participation in sports, your performance on the President's Challenge Fitness test, and whether or not you meet the Army's height and weight standards. The better your physical and athletic ability, the better your chances. Leader criteria is determined by your participation in leadership positions in extra-curricular activities both in and out of high school during your high school years. Particular emphasis is placed on leadership positions you may have held on sports teams, volunteer activities, part-time work, clubs, scouting, church, etc. The more extensive your leadership record in these activities, the better your chances. The Cadet Command selection board makes decisions based on the strength of your application compared to the applicant pool. The profile for the 2014 academic year nation-wide recipients:

    95% were in the top 50% of their classes in academic (79% were in the top 25%)
    35% were class officers
    63% earned varsity sports letters
    43% were varsity team sports captains
    27% were in JROTC
    15% were club presidents
    3.5 average GPA
    1247 math + critical reading SAT; 27 ACT composite score

    Q: How many scholarships are available nation-wide?
    A: For the academic year 2014-2015, 8,434 high school seniors applied for the scholarship. About 2,500 applicants were awarded a scholarship. About 25% (625) of those were 4-year scholarships and 75% were 3-year scholarships.

    Q: What is the difference between a 4-year and a 3-year Army ROTC Scholarship?
    A: Cadet Command awards both three year and four year scholarships through the centralized selection process. The top candidates are selected for four year scholarships, others are awarded three-year scholarships, and others are not selected at all. If you are awarded a 4-year scholarship, then your benefits will be paid your freshman year as long as you pass the Army fitness test, medical exam, and meet height and weight requirements. If you are awarded a 3-year scholarship, your benefits will begin your sophomore year as long as you pass the Army fitness test, physical exam, remain in good academic standing, and meet the height and weight requirements. Final award of the 3-year scholarship is at the discretion of the Professor of Military Science at UNG.

    Q: What is my service obligation?
    A: Any Army commission, Active Duty, Reserve or Guard, carries an 8-year service obligation. If you receive an Army ROTC scholarship, then you must commission and serve in the Regular Army for at least 4 years after you graduate from UNG. The last 4 years of your service obligation may be served in the Guard, Reserve, Individual Ready Reserve, or you may remain on active duty for the full 8 years or until retirement. It is also possible to commission directly into the Army National Guard or Reserve without commissioning active duty. Obligation is 6 years of active drill duty (one weekend per month and two weeks of annual training), plus two years in the Individual Ready Reserve
     
  12. BLUF

    BLUF Member

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    Based on my NROTC observation through this process last year, out of the 2500 awarded by Army Nationwide, some turned them down as they were also awarded Service Academy offers and non-military deals, so I would expect the actual numbers to be less.

    I believe the Navy had approximately 1,200 4-year (Navy, Nurse, and Marine Options). Those in school are now competing for approximately the same number of in-house scholarships.

    At VMI, they received 23 (15 Navy/8 Marine) on 4yr. Scholarship, Class of 18.

    Class of 15, Navy had 49 commission (29 Navy/20 Marines), Army commissioned 104 and Air Force 14,

    Class of 14, 58 (35N/23M) commissioned.

    Based on these numbers it appears that they doubled the number of those arriving with commission tracks with the in-house scholarships. Probably not the same math at non-SMC's.
     
  13. soccmomer

    soccmomer Member

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    Wilson - I can tell you that it truly shocked us that our son was offered a 4 year AROTC scholarship to his top 3 schools last year. his SAT/ACT scores although OK, were slightly below the average listed above. Other than that though, he lettered in 2 Varsity sports, was a Varsity Captain, Eagle Scout,and Boy's State attendee. Academically, he was in the top 10% of his class (small rural high school).
    Even though SAT/ACT scores are important, having lowish scores is not the total deciding factor if he has some of the other qualifications. Sometimes the kids stress way too much and absolutely cannot score well on the ACT/SAT. My son took each about 3 times, plus taking a review course, and raised his scores only minimally. It was the Reading parts that he simply could not raise. Could he have studied for them some more? Most likely. Would it have helped? Most likely not. So have your son take those tests again in the fall, or now if there is still a test he can sign up for. But, don't stress him out too much - some kids just don't test well! Good luck!
     
  14. Wilson2020

    Wilson2020 New Member

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    Soccmomer - thanks for your reply, it's definitely encouraging. DS has already taken the SAT twice and his score didn't rise much, so taking a 3rd time in the fall and missing the 1st boards might do more harm then good. He does have a lot of other good things going for him plus I think he'll do well in the interview so hopefully that will have more weight then the test scores.

    It's going to be a very long road ahead as we start this process!
     
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  15. k2rider

    k2rider Member

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    Wilson....not sure what your son's hopes and dreams are but keep in mind, born out in the stats above, that the Army gives out more scholarships than the other (3) services combined. There are rumors that it may be changing but they also don't seem to be as focused on STEM majors which opens more doors as well.
     
  16. USMAROTCFamily

    USMAROTCFamily Member

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    I would say that you want to insure that you have the absolute strongest packet if you are applying for the first board, since there are no updates to your file once you are boarded and your file is scored. (I've even heard that increased test scores that are reported after the file is boarded may not get updated in the file) So insure all of your leadership positions, varsity letters, top test scores, etc. are already on file when you apply. If there are additions to these items that will occur that first semester of high school, you may wish to wait. I agree with another poster that if your DS has not taken the ACT, he should do that, too. Our DS did much better on the ACT than the SAT. He did take each one multiple times. I would think for the first board, the bar is pretty high when it comes to the standardized test scores, at least that is how it seemed when the results came out and responders posted. DS was an awardee for the first board and academically, he was strong and had the leadership, sports, etc. He did not rush to get his application completed early, however, as he did get appointed to be a fall sport team captain and wanted to see if he could complete his Eagle Rank before his packet needed to be done. He was completed just before the fall deadline. I would love to hear from Clarkson, as to any final stats from this year about the number of scholarships awarded by each of the 3 boards and if they have any other average stats from this year's boards.
     
  17. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    In total number of national scholarships . . . yes . . . but it appears the Army only awarded 600 4 year scholarships this year with the rest being 3 year scholarships.

    I have seen attributed elsewhere but can't find the source that the AF only awarded 300 national ROTC scholarships last year and had the same number this year.

    Wilson -- I agree with the other posters . . . knowing what I know now, we did not have to "rush" to make the 1st Army ROTC board. My DS had pretty good SAT score (1950); GPA was a little low (3.5 taking IB curriculum); great athletics (4 Varsity Letters Football with All Conference Honors; 3 Varsity Letters Track with All Conference & Region Honors; Karate Black Belt); good leadership (Team Captain Football, elected member of Church Youth Pastoral Council), and great documented community service through our Church (hypothermia shelter, weekend repairs of homes of poor and elderly, etc.). I would say his PFA was "average". His Army ROTC interview went very well. He was not awarded on 1st board but was awarded a 4 year Army ROTC scholarship on 2nd board.

    If my memory is correct from previous posts, they awarded only 4 year scholarships from the first board and the stats I saw posted from those that were awarded were pretty high SAT and ACT scores. They awarded approximately 270 scholarships from that first board, so the majority of the 4 year scholarships (by a few in number) were awarded on the 2nd and 3rd boards.

    I'd say try and take that ACT a couple of times before submitting the package to see if it makes a difference. I think it is OK to miss the 1st board deadline but don't miss the 2nd board deadline.
     
  18. DJA

    DJA Member

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    Here is the AROTC Whole Person Score system in place. So the test scores are not valued as much as WP (which is 37%) but again to reiterate Falcon A's post above the 4 year winners had high test scores. To get a 4 year scholarship the SAT/ACT test scores are in many cases more competitive than WP's. My DS got a 30 on the ACT which is 2 points better than the average WP appointment last year.

    My DS missed the first and second board deadlines and still got a 4 year scholarship (although I wouldn't recommend postponing it that long.)

    Also, keep updating your file with any accomplishments up until the deadlines. I know my DS did and his file was really strong by the time the board met.

    Whole Person Score
    Area of Consideration Possible Points
    CBEF 250 points (Cadet Background and Experiences Form)
    PMS Interview 200 points
    ROTC Physical Fitness Test 150 points
    SAT/ACT 250 points
    Scholar/Athlete/Leader 200 points
    Board Members 350 points
    Total 1400 points

    Here is the sample interview test questions:

    https://www.goarmy.com/content/dam/goarmy/downloaded_assets/pdfs/rotc-overseas-interview-form.pdf

    Here is an overview of the scholarship process:

    http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&jsonp=vglnk_143316860381010&key=8ddc2a45f08ec58c7efa34bfb7d58d48&libId=iadzj18k01000fwo000DA2juzuozc&loc=http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/army-rotc-third-board-winners.42694/page-6&v=1&out=http://www.houstonisd.org/cms/lib2/TX01001591/Centricity/Domain/12112/ROTC_Scholarships.ppt&ref=http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?forums/rotc.27/page-3&title=ARMY ROTC Third Board Winners | Page 6 | United States of America Service Academy Forums&txt=http://www.houstonisd.org/cms/lib2/TX01001591/Centricity/Domain/12112/ROTC_Scholarships.ppt
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2015
  19. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just for new posters or lurkers, please remember that each branch has their own system that varies from when their boards meet to how the process works. Do not assume that they all work the same.

    Many new posters will write ROTC without realizing that it is best to state which branch to get the most out of responses.
     
  20. Wilco

    Wilco Member

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    Few suggestions, at least for AROTC. Have a plan B, plan C, and if really neurotic plan D. If any major medical issues review them early, and try to get answers, may save a lot of heartache later. Have paperwork ready well in advance: coaches may not be available at the last minute to do the PFA; transcripts might be delayed. Choose applying schools carefully, choices make a difference, including the PMS who will do the interview. Their decision carries great weight. Elite private (i.e. very expensive) may have fewer scholarship slots and more applicants. Child may score high on the national OML but not high enough for certain school. Weigh decision on whether child, and you, can afford the school without the scholarship. And if cannot afford it, make sure child completely understands if the scholarship goes, may not be able to stay at that school. Be realistic as much as possible, try not to let them fall in love with a school, so that they “just cannot go anywhere else.” Scholarships really are the carrots to get interested, qualified candidates to commit. Actually more of a loan paid back with service time, 4 years AD or 8 years reserve. Not all officers were on scholarship, and in older times 1/2 marine officers came from PLC and OCS, not ROTC or academy. And oh yeah, have a plan B, plan C, and if really neurotic plan D. Good luck to all.
     
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