Third Mate License

Discussion in 'Merchant Marine Academy - USMMA' started by silvergateyc, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. silvergateyc

    silvergateyc seadog

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    If you go active duty after you graduate I understand that you will not be able to get enought sea days to keep your Third Mate License. Is this true? Is there a way to put a license into a dormant state while you are on active duty. Do sea days in the Navy count towards your total needed to keep you license active?
     
  2. Prudent Mariner

    Prudent Mariner Member

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    I went on active duty in the surface navy after I graduated and I was able to upgrade to second mate using my navy sea time. My navy sea time was credited at 60%, so after three years on the ship I had plenty of time to upgrade. I spent most of my time as the navigator, so it wasn't much of a problem getting the CG to see things my way. This was in the 1980's, so your mileage may vary.
     
  3. silvergateyc

    silvergateyc seadog

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    Does active duty affect your Third Assistant Engineer License

    Do your get enought sea days to keep you Third Assistant Engineer Licenese also?
     
  4. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    There is a difference between renewing a license and upgrading. You don't actually need any sea time to renew the license, you just need to take a renewal exam. Not sure of the specifics for mates but for engineers there are three modules, steam motor and safety. You usually need to retake BST to keep STCW, but you will participate in enough drills and the like in the Navy that you shouldn't have to. I do know mates also have requirements for ARPA and GMDSS type stuff.

    As to upgrading, you will certainly get enough time. The hard part will be proving it to the Coast Guard. You will have to be very proactive in maintaining documentation. In the civilian seafaring world it is pretty easy. We get discharges from the vessel or letters from our company that say how many sea days we have in a given time period. For the Navy it is not as simple because of the amount of time you might be spending at the pier or your duties are not necessarily directly navigational or engineering. You will want to document the vessel assigned, actual days at sea, duties assigned, actual work performed, any qualifications achieved and drills participated in.

    My suggestion would be to package it all in an official letter on letterhead addressed from your ship CO to the NMC CO. If your ship is changing command, get it from each one. Find a good YN on board who can help you with the intricacies of the Naval Correspondence Manual
     
  5. Beaz

    Beaz Member

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    I come in Peace...

    Gentlemen, let me begin by saying I spent 31 years in the Army. I spent about 6 days on a ship. When the Army is deployed we get additional pay with the amount of days, etc. Dose the Navy have the same type thing. For example if you are deployed i.e. to the P-Gulf? If it does, can you use your pay voucher to prove your days at sea?
     
  6. tankercaptain

    tankercaptain Member

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    As long as you are sailing on a ship you can earn sea time towards upgrade. Who ever told you that is wrong and does not know what they are talking about. However you will earn 60% of the sea time towards upgrade or renewel.
     
  7. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    A deployed vessel is not necessarily a vessel at sea. You can be deployed and tied to the pier. I doubt a pay stub has enough information anyway. It would have to specify a ship and I'm pretty sure all it says is DFAS.
     
  8. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    Welcome back tankercaptain ... haven't seen you in a while :thumb:
     
  9. tankercaptain

    tankercaptain Member

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    Thanks!
     
  10. KPaviator

    KPaviator Member

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    Call the NMC. I graduated KP in 2009, sailed for about a year, and now I'm active duty Army. My license has been in an inactive state since May 2010.
     
  11. tankercaptain

    tankercaptain Member

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    (g) Inactive document renewal. (1) Applicants for renewal of merchant mariner's documents that are endorsed with qualified ratings, who are unwilling or otherwise unable to meet the requirements of paragraphs (c) or (d) of this section may renew the merchant mariner's document, with the following restrictive endorsement placed on the document: “Continuity only; service under document prohibited.” Holders of merchant mariner's documents with this continuity endorsement may have the prohibition rescinded at any time by satisfying the renewal requirements in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section and § 12.02-9(f) of this part.
     
  12. KPEngineer

    KPEngineer Eternal Father ...

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    Why go for continuity if you can keep it active?

    § 11.213 Sea service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States and on vessels owned by the United States as qualifying experience.
    (a) Sea service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States will be accepted as qualifying experience for an original, raise of grade, or increase in scope of all officer endorsements. In most cases, military sea service will have been performed upon ocean waters; however, inland service, as may be the case on smaller vessels, will be credited in the same manner as conventional evaluations. The applicant must submit an official transcript of sea service as verification of the service claimed when the application is submitted. The applicant must also provide the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection other necessary information as to tonnage, routes, horsepower, percentage of time underway, and assigned duties upon the vessels which he or she served. Such service will be evaluated by the OCMI and forwarded to the Commandant for a determination of its equivalence to sea service acquired on merchant vessels and the appropriate grade, class, and limit of officer endorsement for which the applicant is eligible. Normally, 60 percent of the total time on board is considered equivalent underway service; however, the periods of operation of each vessel may be evaluated separately. In order to be eligible for a master's or chief engineer's unlimited officer endorsement, the applicant must have acquired military service in the capacity of commanding officer or engineer officer, respectively.

    (b) Service in deck ratings on military vessels such as seaman apprentice, seaman, boatswain's mate, quartermaster, or radarman are considered deck service for the purposes of this part. Service in other ratings may be considered if the applicant establishes that his or her duties required a watchstanding presence on or about the bridge of a vessel. Service in engineer ratings on military vessels such as fireman apprentice, fireman, engineman, machinists, mate, machinery technician or boiler tender are considered engineer service for the purposes of this part. There are also other ratings such as electrician, hull technician, or damage controlman which may be credited when the applicant establishes that his or her duties required watchstanding duties in an operating engine room.

    (c) In addition to underway service, members of the Armed Forces may obtain creditable service for periods of assignment to vessels at times other than underway, such as in port, at anchor, or in training. Normally, a 25% factor is applied to these time periods. This experience can be equated with general shipboard familiarity, training, ship's business, and other related duties.

    (d) Sea service obtained on submarines is creditable, as if it were surface vessel service, for deck and engineer officer endorsements under the provision of paragraph (a) of this section. For application to deck officer endorsements, submarine service may be creditable if at least 25 percent of all service submitted for the endorsement was obtained on surface vessels (e.g. If four years' total service were submitted for an original officer endorsement, at least one year must have been obtained on surface craft in order for the submarine service to be eligible for evaluation).

    (e) Service gained in a civilian capacity as commanding officer, master, mate, engineer, or pilot, etc., of any vessel owned and operated by the United States, in any service, in which a license or officer endorsement as master, mate, engineer, or pilot was not required at the time of such service, is evaluated by the OCMI and forwarded to the National Maritime Center for a determination of equivalence.
     
  13. tankercaptain

    tankercaptain Member

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    I don't disagree with you! I used military sea service to upgrade.
     

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