those accepted with color deficiency?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by Vista123, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    We are finishing this arduous journey for son #1. son #1 had NO medical issues what so ever, so this part of the process is new to us.

    Son#2 just starting to prepare for the application process for class of 2018. Son#2 extremely motivated to become an officer in the army. If possible he would like to attend USMA but will also eagerly seek ROTC opportunities.

    I have some questions:

    Son#2 is color deficient with some major challenges with red/green. He can not pass the Ishihara Test (dot test). He will fail the opto exam and hopefully get to work on a waiver. He knows he can not be in a boat nor can he fly (those were not his goals).

    Can someone please explain the process after failing the Ishihara Test (dot test)? Does USMA use the Farnsworth Lantern test as the next test? what if they fail this?

    Are the medical standards to ROTC the same?

    Has any poster on here received an appointment after failing the color Ishihara Test (dot test) and then the next test (Ie Farnsworth Lantern test)?


    Thank You Sincerely,

    Vista123

    PS-Please dont reply that if he doesn't apply he will have zero chance. I know this already. I am seeking recent anecdotal experiences and current information -no need for motivational pep talk :smile:
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
  2. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Though I don't have a reg handy, all my tests at USMA and in Army Aviation have been the Ishihara Dot Test. I have never taken a FALANT test. I believe, however, both are acceptable. It is my understanding, however, that he would likely also fail a FALANT test as it is not for vivid color determination testing.

    ROTC med standards would be the same.

    As for a waiver, the waiver process is owned by the academy. If they find your son compelling enough as a candidate, they may exercise the option.

    I do not personally know of any profoundly colorblind folks who have been waived into the academy. Hopefully someone with more experience will chime in.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
  3. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    The DODI 6130.03 (Medical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Military
    Services, Dated 13 September Change 1) refers to Services to Determine Color Vision Standards. Army DoDMERB reviewer will most likely render the DQ if indicated for the Army and let the commissioning source determine if a waiver will be necessary. AR 40-501 is the governing document for the Army, specifically Chapter 2, Paragraph 13, sub-paragraph f:

    "f. Color vision (368.5). Failure to pass a color vision test is not an automatic disqualification. Although there is no
    standard, color vision will be tested because adequate color vision is a prerequisite for entry into many military
    specialties. However, for entrance into the USMA or Army ROTC or OCS programs, the inability to distinguish and
    identify without confusion the color of an object, substance, material, or light that is uniformly colored a vivid red or
    vivid green does not meet the standard."

    Table 8-1 in the same AR documents the requirements of the "Recording of Medical Examination." (DD 2808)

    Item Box Number 66 is for Color Vision Testing. It states: "Record results in terms of test used, the results and the number of plates missed over
    number of plates in test. The FALANT (USN) may be utilized. If the examinee fails either of these tests, he or she will be tested for Red/Green vision and the results recorded in item 59 (for example, “PIP, pass, 3/14 or PIP, fail, 9/14”)."

    Item 59 states: "If examinee fails the color vision test in item 66, he/she will be tested to ensure he/she
    can distinguish between vivid red and vivid green and the results recorded as pass or
    fail."

    Now, all waiver decisions are up to the Academy or the ROTC program and they will initiate the waiver process. They will not request a waiver on a candidate that is not competitive in other areas. That implies that the candidate be very competitive academically, physically and possibly have a nomination.

    I recommend completing as much of the application as possible as early as possible. I believe that they allow candidates to start completing the USMA Application in mid to late summer.
     
  4. MomofFutureLeader

    MomofFutureLeader Member

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    Color Deficiency

    My DS did not pass either color vision test. This was never an issue for either USAFA or USMA. He was considered medically qualified for both and received offers of appointment for both. The only reason that he even took the Farnsworth Lantern test was because he was medically DQ by USNA and they requested it. USNA never did come through with a waiver or an offer of appointment but it was all good because his ultimate 1st choice was USAFA anyway and he is in his first year there this year. So, I would say that unless there has been a change between last year and this year that USMA will not care about the color deficiency and that it will be a non issue.
     
  5. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    I am very happy for your child's acceptance into a military academy. Since every candidate's medical situation is unique, though, your child's medical qualification is anecdotal and might not mean that the OP's child will be qualified. The Army Regulation states:

    "...for entrance into the USMA or Army ROTC or OCS programs, the inability to distinguish and
    identify without confusion the color of an object, substance, material, or light that is uniformly colored a vivid red or
    vivid green does not meet the standard."

    If the OPs child cannot "distinguish and identify without confusion the color of an object, substance, material, or light that is uniformly colored a vivid red or vivid green..." they might be determined to be medically disqualified and the candidate should be prepared for that.
     
  6. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    Don't worry Goarmybeatnavy, I definitely know what works for the goose may not work for the gander-and YMMV. The poster just answered the question I posed. :smile:

    When I called dodmerb they said color vision is not a DQ for usma or usafa but is for USNA, USMMA and USCGA (they were clear that flying is different- but my son does not want to fly). However, I also saw the reg that you posted. So it is all clear as mud.

    The color vision thing is so perplexing to me. Last night-just to check it out I gave my son a box of marker caps about thirty, all various shades of greens and reds. He knew every single one. he could label, match, sort and idnetifty them. But he can not pass a dot test. I do not know if he would pass or fail the lantern.

    To be honest my first son just spent two years going through the application for USNA (class of 2017) it was long, arduous and to be realistic VERY expensive! I know the USMA and ROTC applications would be the same. If there was no shot of him getting in at the end, it is better to know now. (In my very personal opinion) but if there is some hope than #2 son will just keep bulleting forward.
     
  7. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    I hope there are no problems and he is appointed into the academy. Good luck:thumb:
     
  8. MomofFutureLeader

    MomofFutureLeader Member

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    I did not mean to imply that this was a rule set in stone, regardless of the extent of color deficiency. This was just our experience. My DS sounds very similar to yours, in that he is color deficient, not totally color blind. I can show him any object in a room and he knows the color with 100% accuracy. However, he cannot detect some of the more subtle differences in shade between 10 different shades of the same color. He would say all 10 green markers are green but perhaps some of the shades would look the same to him. I don't know what it is about the color tests that throw him because in the real world he has never had any trouble identifying colors. You will have to see what happens when you get your official DodMerb letter but my two cents worth is that if he is only somewhat color deficient and can idientify colors in the way that you describe, I would be surprised that USMA would consider it an issue. That may have changed this year, but this was just our personal experience with the issue.
     

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