Transferring fromArotc to AFrotc scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by youtoo, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. youtoo

    youtoo Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is it possible to transfer from an Army ROTC scholarship to an AIr Force scholarship after completing one year of a 4 year scholarship??
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    451
  3. Bill1899

    Bill1899 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is it possible to accept an ROTC scholarship, start college and then apply for admission to an academy during freshman year?

    Thanks
     
  4. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,699
    Likes Received:
    451
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,809
    Likes Received:
    956
    Curiosity here youtoo, but why do you want to change branches. If I am correct you are already in college.

    Is it because the Army was not matching your vision, or is it because your career aspirations have changed?

    Two different things. I get a little nervous when people in ROTC decide to go to another branch. It begs the question of what is their motivation in this decision process.

    Each branch is very unique regarding their mission and lifestyle.

    Transferring over to AFROTC also comes with a new set of issues.
    ~~AFROTC has a make or break yr, which is after C200 (sophomore yr). If not selected for SFT aka EA (equiv to LDAC) the cadet may be dis-enrolled from AFROTC. Selection is not guaranteed even for scholarship recipients

    ~~ AF wants STEM majors and that is a player for scholarships. @80-85% go to STEM. Even if you could get an IS scholarship, your major will be a factor.

    ~~ AFROTC cadets upon graduation and commissioning will serve at least 4 yrs AD. There is no IRR. The clock does not start ticking at commissioning. It starts the day you arrive at the AD base. For some fields, it could be 6-9 months after commissioning.

    If this decision is tied to flying fixed wing instead or rotor, remember a couple of things.
    1. There is no guarantee you will get a UPT slot
    2. You will owe the AF 10 yrs, after winging. UPT is 1 yr., you may end up waiting close to a yr to report to UPT. That means before you can leave the AF it will be 12 yrs after pinning on your butter bars, or around 34 yo.

    Before you jump, make sure you know everything. I would suggest that you talk to the AFROTC CoC and see the viability if your military career plan even with a scholarship. Again SFT/EA is HUGE, HUGE, HUGE! I cannot stress it enough how big this issue is! You can get an IS, not selected for SFT and the scholarship will go away! You will be dis-enrolled and not eligible to enter even through OCS after graduation.

    Old posters like me, really try to stress to younger posters that college is PT even as a FT student when you compare it to the AD world. Scholarships are great, but they come with a price, and that price is at least 4 yrs AD, 365 days a yr, 40+ hrs work week, moving to wherever they want you to go, and whenever they tell you to do it.

    JMPO, the grass is not greener on the AF's side and opt AF because of this fallacy. Many people believe that the AF operational tempo is easier than the Army because for the last decade the Army has been in the sandbox. The fact is the AF never left the sandbox since 1990. Can we all say ONW/OSW? In the 20 yrs Bullet was in, he spent at least 1/3rd of his career in the sandbox. It traditionally is 4-6 months in, 8-12 months out. That does not include TDY's to Red/Green Flag, Cope Thunder, etc. HONESTLY, the grass is not greener, it is just a different shade of green!

    I am not trying to say this is your motivation, I am trying to say if it is than maybe you need to think longer and harder.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2012

Share This Page