Transferring into West Point

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Shevlock, Jun 5, 2007.

  1. Shevlock

    Shevlock New Member

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    I applied for the point in high school, received a congressional nomination, got a letter of assurance etc. After my medical examination, I was rejected by dodmerb for eye problems (intermittent alternating esotropia). It was one of the worst days of my life, and I hadn't applied to many other schools because I had thought that I was assured a spot in West Point. I ended up going to Cuny Honors, Hunter College for a year, and I got accepted to UPenn somewhat recently.

    There has not been many days that go by that I do not think about reapplying to West Point. I am aware that I will have to start over, losing two years of college credit (since I won't be able to apply for 2011). I also don't know if I can get a medical waiver this time around. I am planning to visit West Point this summer to meet with an admissions officer and explain my situation, but can anyone shed any light on what my chances are of getting that waiver?

    I'm a pretty driven individual, but I'm also not sure if West Point is worth losing two years of college. Should I just try and go for OCS after graduating from UPenn?

    My medical problem is not correctable, but I did not put forth enough effort in trying to get a waiver, a mistake that I will rectify if I do apply again.

    Furthermore, will I even be able to get a commission, since it was dodmerb that rejected me, rather than West Point?

    Thank you in advance for any insight and comments.
     
  2. CAnderson197

    CAnderson197 Candidate Appointee

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    OCS spots tend to be like Green To Gold spots...reserved for enlisted soldiers with tenure who want to be officers. However, if being an officer is something you want...Consult the ROTC Officer at the college you wish to attend. Although you have missed two years, at the end of your sophomore year the Army will send you to Fort Lewis and you will get an 18-Week "Catchup Course" where you will learn what we have learned the two years you missed. Hope this helps!
     
  3. ChipAyten

    ChipAyten Member

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    You should pursue an ROTC scholarship as well if commissioning is what you want. You wont have to redue the 2 years you missed, its not west point but its a backup. And if you really want to go to west point you should apply to SMC's as the army gives out more of their scholarships to SMC schools
     
  4. CAnderson197

    CAnderson197 Candidate Appointee

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    I'm pretty sure ROTC is one of those things you have to take all 4 years of, Chip...The leadership fundamentals keep building off of one another.
     
  5. RetNavyHM

    RetNavyHM USN (RET)

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    Intermittent alternating esotropia is a very difficult waiver to get, due to the difficulty in correcting to 20/20 and maintaining binocular vision. This is not to say do attempt to apply. If this is your dream, you should reapply (you'll have to get a new physical exam) and push for the waiver. If you've read any of my other replies to applicants who have been disqualified, and even waiver denied, write those letters. Let the wavier authority know how much this means to you.

    If you meet with the admissions officer let him/her know just how much this means to you, also do not hide the fact that you were previously waiver denied. Let them know that you are really going to push it this time around.

    The standards for OCS (direct commission) are the same as for any service academy or ROTC program. It may be a little easier to get a waiver going direct commission (since the government hasn't paid your college tab), but that’s not to say it’s always that way.

    All the services offer a 2 - 3 year ROTC in-college scholarship. Most (but not all) are offered to applicants who have participated with the ROTC detachment as a non-scholarship applicant. Check with the ROTC detachment at your school and see what they advise. Again, you'll have to go through the DoDMERB process.

    If you are granted a waiver for a service academy or ROTC program, once you graduate you will be (as long as your condition hasn't worsened) granted a waiver for commissioning. You may be limited in your specialty field choices.
     
  6. Shevlock

    Shevlock New Member

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    Thank you for the responses.

    Do I have no chance of obtaining a waiver if binocular vision is not possible to attain? Because in my case, it is not.

    If this is the case, does this disqualify me from all branches of armed services?
     
  7. Shevlock

    Shevlock New Member

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    Someone said earlier (just noticed) that you had to take ROTC for four years. Is this true? And if so, does that exclude me from that possibility as well?
     
  8. RetNavyHM

    RetNavyHM USN (RET)

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    The real issue is the intermittent alternating esotropia. Because of the multiple issues associated with intermittent alternating esotropia (difficulty correcting to 20/20, lack of binocular vision, etc) the military is leary of investing the time and money of school, training, etc for someone who may not be able to do his/her job due to a medical/vision issue.

    The intermittent alternating esotropia will be a disqualification for all services, and I couldn't tell you if one service would waiver over another. All I can tell you is if this is something that you want you need to apply to the service that you would like to serve in.

    The answer for your second question was answered in my initial response.
     
  9. USNA69

    USNA69 Banned

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    There is a six week program offered at Ft Knox, and maybe other locations, each summer for which the Army pays and which allows one to move straight into the final 2 years of advanced Army ROTC.

    And U Penn has a cross town agreement with Drexel. However, if your dream is USMA, don't give up. Just see where your waiver goes. That is the tough part.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2007
  10. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    It is called LTC - or Leader's Training course. It is 4 weeks in Ft Knox for college rising juniors who commit to the Army and have not had the first two years of ROTC in college. It is a 4 week "basic" course that takes the place of first and second years of ROTC. You would have to qualify medically (or be medically waivered) since you are making a commitment to the Army and will be contracted.

    If you are going to UPenn as a sophomore - you can go ahead and sign up for ROTC - and take the class. You can take ROTC as an elective for your first two years of college and would not yet have to qualify medically. If you have ever visted UPenn you probably already know that Drexel is right next door to Penn. You can then apply for a two year scholarship for your last two years at Penn and/or reapply to USMA
    Here is the website for Drexel ROTC: http://armyrotc.com/edu/drexel/index.htm perhaps if you email or call their ROTC department they can help you out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2007
  11. Shevlock

    Shevlock New Member

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    Thank you for the clarification, RetNavyHM, and I apologize for not seeing that response to the ROTC question initially.

    Just a mom and USNA, thanks for the link and information, I will be checking it out in the coming weeks, as ROTC will becoming more of a possibility for me now.

    Just to clarify further, is a waiver more difficult/easier to attain based on what I'm applying it for? As in, will a USMA waiver be more difficult to get as opposed to a basic enlistment/ROTC/etc? Or are they all passed by the same people at dodmerb who have the same standards for all venues?

    Sorry if these questions seem a little redundant, I just want to make my options perfectly clear so that I can make the best decision for myself.
     
  12. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Each entity operates it's own waiver board. At USMA they process their own waivers. Cadet Command HQ in Fort Monroe process the AROTC waivers.
    It is possible to get a waiver from one and not the other.

    My dau. needed a waiver and the waiver came from USMA much quicker than from AROTC. It is hard to tell.
    I have no idea what your eye condition entails but keep in mind that the Army needs officers.
     
  13. CAnderson197

    CAnderson197 Candidate Appointee

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    Very true!

    I was waiver by AROTC within weeks of submission of my request, however 8 weeks after the AROTC waiver came, USMA sent a waiver denial letter.
     

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