Transpo officer

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by Chockstock, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    I am considering transportation as initial branch and am aware of waterborne operations that is a possible path in the branch. The Runnymede-class is the ship you can command, I believe. Is there anyone who knows about how to get a slot into commanding an Army ship as a transpo officer? I think it would be pretty cool! Thanks. Can't believe I'll be a firstie come this fall :smile:

    -CS
     
  2. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Warrant Officers command the Army's vessels. The Runnymede is commanded by a CW2. The largest Army vessels - LSVs which are about 315 ft, are commanded by a CW4/ CW5. A few years ago I thought that the Army and Navy had reached an agreement to transfer these assets to the Navy, but apparently that never went anywhere.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2013
  3. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    What is the allure of transportation? What did you do for CTLT?
     
  4. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    A liking for the sea and its lore?
     
  5. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    If only that's what the Army did...
     
  6. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Try Military Sealift Command.
    Uimited CG license is probably the first hurdle. Do your five and Knowing green from red is probably the next. Son did Persion Gulf this year and loved it with great pictures of refuling and resupply.
     
  7. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Why, as an able-bodied young man, are you considering a support branch as your first choice?
     
  8. Full Metal Bulldog

    Full Metal Bulldog Citadel Class of 2016

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    ........I've seen plenty of 4.0, 300 pt score, E at LDAC cadets from my unit choose support branches, my guess is that it's just what they think will be a fun and successful Army career for them. Others really don't want to be shot at, have a girlfriend that won't let them choose Combat Arms, or just would rather be in the back of the pack rather than in the middle of the war. I've also seen a few 3.0, 250 pt score, S at LDAC guys get Infantry......so it just depends really.
     
  9. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Maybe he's concerned about employment after Army... where you no longer have to be able-bodied but shooting isn't as helpful?
     
  10. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Still have to be able-bodied but the pay is better in Sealift Command. Ability to shoot is a plus but I don't think they issue weapons but must have a weapons locker somwhere.:thumb: Pirates in the Gulf and off the coast of the horn?
     
  11. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    Why not?

    Does the support branch not need West Point educated able-bodied young men?
     
  12. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Everything you learn in transportation you'd learn better in other branches, plus some.
     
  13. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    "Amateurs talk tactics, professionals talk logistics."

    That said, talking tactics is a lot more interesting to me!
     
  14. Packer

    Packer Member

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    We just hired a young man, a former Marine, for an entry level position. He completed 3 tours in the sandbox. His words: "thanks for taking a chance on me, most wouldn't. I am a hell of a good machine gunner but there doesn't seem to be much call for those skills in civilian life".

    Something to be said for learning some skills that the civilian world recognizes. Might help make the transition a little easier.
     
  15. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Yeah, well, like I said...the Transportation Corps teaches all sorts of valuable skills like...how to drive an Army truck (which almost everyone learns anyway) and...how to use ULLS-G (which only the military uses)...and...and...yup, that's pretty much it. Everything else they do us either common core or a task a combat arms soldier does as a secondary function.
     
  16. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    If you're letting a girlfriend (or boyfriend) tell you what branch you can and cannot choose, you've got bigger issues...
     
  17. nick4060

    nick4060 Member

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    Seconded.
     
  18. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    Oh. I wonder why West Point brought a Runnymede to south dock two years ago for branch day if only warrant officers command ships?? Yeah, I would have joined the navy or coast guard if I really wanted to be at sea...I don't know, just looking for options. One of the reasons I also signed off Army aviation (sorry Scout)

    I know we are at war and I know the dangers...I have no regrets, West Point is one of the best things to happen to me. I have wanted Armor since plebe year and its only recently I started considering anything else. I guess its hard to say with conviction when you're 21 or 22 to claim you are ready to lead men into combat but I'm pretty convinced it takes a certain kind of individual to lead people into the face of death. I don't want to doubt myself but I just feel that there are others who are probably more naturally adept at it. Making a honest self-assessment is only fair for the soldiers. I just finished CLDT at West Point and yeah...leadership in combat is no funny business. Would I better lead soldiers in combat support? I don't really know.

    Combat arms, infantry above all, is shoved down our throats at West Point. Its too bad theres a big stigma about non-combat. No military will function without combat support! I am also not worried about civilian employment - I don't really think that should be a large factor in deciding branch. Can't rule out a 20 year career either.

    I have an Infantry CTLT that I will be leaving for later this month. Pretty excited to see real Army. Maybe the experience will help me decide :smile:
     
  19. Full Metal Bulldog

    Full Metal Bulldog Citadel Class of 2016

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    +1

    One of the biggest underlying problems with ROTC and the academies I believe.
     
  20. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Don't know, but there were some hilarious memes on the Long Gray Memes page as a result of that boat's visit.

    So, you think those Soldiers in Transportation are deserving of a lesser leader? I'm not really sure what your thinking is here. If you're a leader, you're a leader. As a young man with a West Point pedigree, I think you're more capable of it than you think of being a combat arms leader (as does West Point, which is why they require most males to choose a combat arms branch).


    The stigma is a result of experiences, in most cases. Like it or not, closing with and destroying the enemy is the mission. That's the end all and be all of our existence as a military. All the fluffy crap we do (nation building, vaccinating goats, etc.) is ancillary to our main purpose. The result of that fact is that there will always be a stigma against choosing a branch that's away from the fight.

    I am sure it will. Hopefully you enjoy it and you learn a lot. Where are you headed?
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013

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