Uniform at interview?

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by BenjaminZ, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. BenjaminZ

    BenjaminZ Member

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    Hello all,

    Quick question. I am currently enrolled in Army ROTC and we were issued ASU's recently. If I attain permission, do you think it would be a good or bad idea to wear it to my nomination interview?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  3. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Yes, "BAD".
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I am in the minority,

    Do you look good in the uniform and can you make the uniform not a costume?

    I sat on many nomination boards and seen kids in uniforms. Cases where wearing uniform didn't help were

    - didn't look good
    - person couldn't back up the uniform (someone wearing uniform should be somewhat knowledge about the military).

    What will be your answer if someone asks why you are not wearing your uniform? Please don't say based on an internet forum.
     
  5. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    The cadet would state that ROTC Uniform use is defined by AR 145: .

    This from AR 145:

    4–5. Wearing of the uniform
    Unless otherwise specified by the CG, ROTCCC, wear and appearance of the uniform will be as stated in AR 670–1.
    The Army ROTC uniform will not be worn outside of the United States and its possessions, except by specific
    authority. ROTC cadets may wear the issue uniform within the United States and it possessions when—
    a. Assembled for the purpose of military instruction.
    b. Engaged in the military instruction of a cadet corps or similar organization.
    c. Traveling to and from the school where enrolled.
    d. Visiting a military station for participation in military drills or exercise.
    e. At other functions authorized by the PMS.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  6. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Excellent answer. But if it were me, and I didn't know those refs by heart, along with if I were JrROTC or cap, I'd simply say: "sir/ma'am, I'm not currently in the military. I hope to be and that's why I'm here today. Too many men and women have put their lives on the line wearing the uniform. We owe them a debt that can never be repaid. I have too much respect for our service men and women. And I'm not presumptuous enough to believe that I have earned that level of respect yet. If I was active duty enlisted, i'd wear my uniform proudly to this interview. But currently, I'm simply a civilian in the Rotc program, hoping for the honor to be in the same company as those who are serving my country."
    That's what I would say. Probably with some different words. I have nothing against rotc or the cadets. But when I was preparing to retire from active duty, I didn't wear my uniform to civilian job interviews. That would be inappropriate. If I'm not in the military, I'm not going to wear a uniform from a different organization to somehow try and associate me as being equal to what I am applying for. Why not wear a boy scout uniform or a police or fireman uniform if you were one? Don't try and convince the panel that you are more worthy of a nomination or appointment because you wear a uniform. It's bad form.
     
  7. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Thanks. Learning something new everyday.
     
  8. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    This begs to the question - what is a cadet (status wise) - in the military or not?
     
  9. FlyBoy1993

    FlyBoy1993 Member

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    Last year, my DS served in the color guard that opened the interview process for the day. After presenting colors, he changed into his regular suit jacket and tie.

    One of the interviewers asked him directly why he changed clothes. His response, " because this interview is about me, not the uniform."

    I thought it was a good response, but if done properly, wearing the uniform would be OK. Just don't use it as a prop, or an "in." It will provide you no leverage. The interview is about the candidate, not his/ her clothes.
     
  10. Blue&SilverBear

    Blue&SilverBear USAFA Alumnus

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    The first time I went on Ops: AF and the gate guard got really confused when we showed our ID cards that said "Cadet" and "active." We explained that we were from the Academy, and she said "Oh... so you're real active duty Cadets?"

    I think that about sums it up.
     
  11. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Blue&Silverbear answered quite accurately. An academy cadet IS considered active duty. As unlikely as it is; if there was a war whereby the Department of Defense found it necessary; they could tell the academy cadets that their education is on hold, and ship them off to the war. A lot of parents really do get confused with this. They believe their cadets are simply college students. Some have even said they are like "FULL TIME ROTC". Now I'm not going to say whether or not an ROTC student is considered active duty. I don't think they are, but I could be wrong. But the academy cadets are 100% legally part of the military active duty force. They aren't considered dependents on mommy and daddy's tax returns any longer. (Except for a few exceptions their first year, but that's rare). Their medical and everything is taken care of by the military. But they are definitely "IN THE ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY".
     

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