USAFA for flying????

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Craig, Apr 16, 2011.

  1. Craig

    Craig Member

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    Son has a strong interest in flying. Why choose USAFA over AFROTC or Navy, etc? How are most slots allocated? Does USAFA get more slots than AFROTC? I understand each year will vary depending upon needs. In general what would be the answer?
     
  2. eagle36

    eagle36 USAFA Alumnus

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    As for slots, for class of 2010, of the 1001 graduates, 519 (plus or minus a few as things changed) recieved pilot slots. From what I've heard from friends in ROTC, they normally only get one or two per class, which is also about 500 nationwide. As for the difference between Navy and AF flying, what sounds more interesting? Do you want to take-off and land (or controlled-crash :p ) on a ship, or do stuff from land? If he goes to an academy and can't fly for whatever reason, would he rather serve 5 years in the AF or Navy?

    The desire to fly should definitely be a factor in choosing what path to go, but it should not be the most prominent. He should really look at the lifestyle he wants and where he wants to serve (assuming he does want to serve in the military, not just fly). Best of luck to him.
     
  3. Craig

    Craig Member

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    Thanks. That's about twice USNA. What is the mix of aircraft types overall (i.e., jets, cargo) in the AF? Understand, type of slots will vary yearly with need.
    P.S. I was Navy LT in the Seabees during Desert Storm. I always admired the AC tents the AF had at their bases. .
     
  4. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    There is no "mix" per se.

    The "needs of the AF" is determined per year and then the timing of the training slots is set, and then the "graduates" from pilot training, after being rank ordered (by performance, not military grade) are "assigned" to a cockpit. They have some "say" in this: they fill out a "dream sheet" and then hope. But there is no guaranteed "mix" at any time.

    Example...not too long ago at Sheppard AFB, home of the "Euro NATO" training program and historically an almost completely fighter-only assignment pipeline...there were no fighters open for a graduating class...they all went to heavies or to be AETC instructors.

    "Needs of the Air Force" dictate the "mix."

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  5. ptwob387

    ptwob387 New Member

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    USAFA '11 got about the same number of slots. As far as a/c breakdown goes, check out the most recent UPT drops. T-38s are your fighters/bombers, while T-1s and T-44s are the heavy guys.
     
  6. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    T-38s drop heavies as well, especially with the current slowdown in fighter slots.

    What it will be like in 5 years...who knows. :confused:
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I understand he has a strong issue in flying.

    I respect that.

    However, the true question IMPO is what branch you want to serve? I understand some are confused on which branch if they want to fly. My question to them would be ASSUME you will not fly at all, what now? What will you do in that branch? You are an officer first and a flier second.

    20% of incoming cadets don't graduate. Medical issues arise. Officers bust UPT. There is absolutely no guarantee that they will fly.

    However, if they graduate, they will serve.

    Flying is a part of your career, yet anyone who has ever made rank after O4, knows even in the AF you probably will need to step out of the cockpit.

    Don't look for the best flying opportunity. Fate has a way of smiting those who only want a path for their personal desires. Enter any branch to wear the service uniform. To live that life in that branch.

    24/7/365 for close to a decade will not make you happy if you only selected that path for a cockpit, and never thought about what if?.

    JMPO.

    My best wishes.
     
  8. Craig

    Craig Member

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    Thanks for all the input. Good points on the medical. Actually told him some stories of guys I knew going through NROTC too many years ago. I've emphasized the importance of a good plan B & C (life in general). You can see the need for that just in the application process. Of course if you don't apply, you have zero chance. My background is Navy, so was trying to get a fell about AF. He is scheduling visits to the ROTC units at Auburn to see what that is all about. If he still has interest when it gets closer to making an application, we'll make a visit to the USAFA.
     

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