USMAPS

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by USMAalltheway, Jul 15, 2009.

  1. USMAalltheway

    USMAalltheway Member

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    Hey!

    I was wondering what exactly makes a candidate considered for USMAPS, is it sub-standard CFA or academic scores or something? Thanks.
     
  2. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    For USMAPS - usually it's for something academic - could be low SAT scores or a lack of higher level math. For instance, if there is a candidate who is tops in leadership and athletics but only took Pre-Calc and the Math SAT's were low, they would probably be recommended for USMAPS.
    There are other reasons but Academics is the biggie.
    I don't think a sub-standard CFA will get you anything.
     
  3. pedro4

    pedro4 Member

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    Football player

    Many football players and other athletes are "red shirted" for a year at MAPS to get them ready for their plebe year. They brush up on their math and get familiar with the military aspects of the academy. It would seem to be extremely difficult to get through plebe year as an athlete without this head start.
     
  4. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    They are not actually "red shirted".
    Plenty of Corps Squad Athletes never step foot on USMAPS, play their sports and get through plebe year just fine.
    It all boils down to academics. That said - being proficient in Math is extremely important.
     
  5. Momof2cadets

    Momof2cadets Founding Member

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    Although you won't hear it admitted offically, Pedro is correct that in some instances it is used this way. My son's plebe year room mate was a prepster who was very adamant that people know that his grades and test scores were in many instances higher than many who went directly to USMA -- they were ceratinly higher than my son. The coach of his sport wanted him to spend a year at prep "maturing". People often go to the prep school because they are deficient in some area academically, or because they have been out of school for a while and need a refresher, but there are other reasons...
     
  6. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    I was at USMAPS R Day last Friday and the Commandant discussed this issue and Just a Mom is correct, it's usually math and the focus of USMAPS is success at USMA, academics first, athletics second, it's their (USMAPS) mission. The power point slide show last Friday, had a graphic showing the averages of the USMAPS Class of 2010 SAT scores and there are actually some students there with 700+ SAT math scores! The chart also showed the the average math and English score was just under 1,150 with direct appointments average around 1,270, this is from memory but I know the difference was around 150 points less at USMAPS

    Now they might have another agenda not publicly discussed but, he went over this subject pretty throughly.

    My son is at USMAPS now and is not a recruited athlete, he also only took pre-calc in high school and had a competitive math SAT score with a lot of leadership (JROTC / Scouts) behind him.

    Momof2cadets has a point also, another possible reason is the Nominating source (in my son's case) told him that he was their number one USMA Nomination but, he wanted him at USMAPS first and asked how he felt with an extra "plebe" year. I guess my son gave him the right answer because the MOC military liaison called us a week later and said he was going to USMAPS. About a month later the appointment came in February.
     
  7. USMAalltheway

    USMAalltheway Member

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    Thank you all for your answers!:thumb:
     

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