USNA Appt. Worth?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by xrunmariarunx, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. xrunmariarunx

    xrunmariarunx Member

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    Does anyone know how much the USNA appointment is worth? My counselor was wondering about the worth so she could announce it at our local Evening of Excellence.

    GO NAVY, BEAT ARMY! :biggrin:
     
  2. Arete

    Arete Candidate Appointee

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    My son's HS Guidance Office wanted the same info so I contacted the USNA Admissions Office last week.

    I was told to tell Guidance to use the figure of approximately $350,000

    Proud father!!!!
     
  3. J Collins

    J Collins Founding Member

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    WOW! I didnt know it was that much !!!!
     
  4. USNA

    USNA Member

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    When we visited USNA, the edumacation value was accorded a value of $334.00, in a PowerPoint presentation produced by USNA.

    Not a bad scholarship in a faltering economy, eh? :shake::rolleyes::cool:
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2009
  5. USMC

    USMC Member

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    yup i remember that ^
     
  6. skierxman

    skierxman Member

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    The appointment itself is not something that is equated to any monetary figure. I would think that it's worth is measured in the sense of pride and personal achievement it gives the appointee.

    The education, room, board and training over 4 years at the academy is currently valued somewhere in the neighborhood of $300,000, I believe.

    Some food for thought:

    I am a former Marine, never attended the academy. All of my information comes from my son, who graduated from the Academy in 06. I remember the post-graduation conversation we had where he reflected on his decision to attend the academy and become a naval officer. I remember he told me something to the effect of, "I am glad I really always wanted the Navy because I would never have been able to survive this place if I came here just for the education." His buddies who graduated with him agreed emphatically.

    I say this because you really have to buy into the program and the lifestyle to make it through. Its really not just about getting a free education at a prestigious institution. You will certainly get that, but if that's the main rationale for considering the academy, one will likely be miserable there.

    My son was always a military buff and always wanted to join the Navy and be a submariner. I think this made it easier for him, even though he would often complain about something or other, especially during Plebe year. What I am saying is, although the prestige and free education are certainly attractive to many, that's probably the wrong reason to be considering a service academy.

    The goal of the academies is to produce military officers, many of whom will be engaged in armed conflict in defense of the nation. Unlike civilian colleges, the education is the means, not the end. I think you really have to believe in what you are doing to make it through such a program.
     
  7. NavyMom2008

    NavyMom2008 Member

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    Great point, Skierxman!! Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Pachrian

    Pachrian Parent

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    Skierxman, you are so right. The other day my son (USNA 2013 appointee) came home from school completely appalled because the USMA appointee at his school had made a comment that he's going for the "free education".

    Free?!? That is such a shortsighted and frankly stupid assessment. You may not actually have to pay in currency but these kids pay in more precious ways.

    Anyway, I'm just glad that my son is going for the right reasons.
     
  9. skierxman

    skierxman Member

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    Hi NavyMom and Pachrian. Just stumbled across this site. Interesting board.

    It's an interesting topic.

    Congratulations on your son's appointment, Pacharian. You will probably be closer to your son over the next four years, even with him being away.

    I am not sure how the USMA interview and admission process compares to the USNA, but I would think they would be able to spot this attitude a mile away. I think such an attitude would be a red flag indicating your intention is simply self-serving and would indicate you might not make the best team player in that environment. I know from my son's interviews and interaction with the local admissions rep that they really make it clear that the goal is to produce competent leaders in the Navy, and succeeding at the academy will involve sacrifice, dedication, and hard work.

    In so many words, they made it clear that applying to the academy is not like applying to Ohio State. They asked just the right questions to gauge what the motivation of the applicant was. I think that's why there is a two-year period during which you can drop, debt-free. They realize the academy is not everyone and despite the interviews with the admission reps, some still did not fully understand what they are getting into and applied for all the the wrong reasons(like a free education.)


    I hear there are a record number of applicants to the academy this year. Some of it probably is related to recruiting efforts but I think common sense would also indicate the economy has something to do with it. It is a prestigious institution and the education is free, but there are real sacrifices. These kids are not going to have the typical college life. The sacrifices are pretty real. I thought the Marines were tough -- it was, but really only for boot camp and AIT then it became relatively relaxed(as far as the Marines go.)

    These kids are going through four years of intense, total immersion military training with very little free time, during the prime years of their lives. This is while they receive a top-notch, four year technical degree. They deserve the free education, because they are earning it -- its not a scholarship, really. While their civilian counterparts are partying and dating, they are being told when to sleep, study, shower, play sports, even how you can eat the food off your plate(when you are a plebe). I have nothing but admiration for these kids. I honestly don't know if I could have done it(let alone get admitted). One thing I learned from my son is that you really have to buy into what you are doing. I don't see how you could get by without this motivation.
     
  10. jamzmom

    jamzmom Founding Member

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    I am in complete agreement with all that has been said. A big well done to Skierxman. If at least one of our newer readers comes away with a little more understanding by Skierxman’s words, it was well worth the effort to write such eloquent thoughts about the not so “free” education of Academy students. Welcome to the forums & please share many more of your thoughts!

    This topic seems to pop up about this time every year. From what I understand, not only do some schools want the information of the dollar amount value of an Academy education for awards ceremonies, they may also use it when it comes time for schools to be evaluated for their own funding in addition to applying for grants. It is thus in my state. I have found that many schools are very proud of having such fine young men and women coming from within their systems. It is such an exciting time for some of the teachers and administrations as well.

    Many congrats to all with appointments and fingers crossed for those still in “wait mode”.
     
  11. Pachrian

    Pachrian Parent

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    Don't forget that this year a record number of kids will be graduating. I bet most colleges received a record number of applications. A) because of the sheer numbers B) because the more competition there is the more colleges the kids apply to in hopes to get accepted somewhere.

    Next year is supposed to be better.
     
  12. USNA

    USNA Member

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    Excellent post, Skier. :thumb:

    These young men entering service academies could likely get scholarships at civilian colleges. Because most have goals that extend beyond green backs. It's not about the money. Nothing is free in life. Midshipmen pay dearly for the privilege to serve and lead. Those appointed to service academies are deemed worthy of the investment. Some may pay for their "free education" with their lives. Others may pay back their debt by saving lives. How sobering it is to consider the heroism and generosity of these fine young men. :eek3:
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  13. hopefulfather

    hopefulfather Parent

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    Yea, I agree that the real reason for going to the USNA is above money. However, many schools want the information for award ceremonies, publicity, funding or other myriad reasons. So, for some of you to belittle a person for asking is being inconsiderate and uninformed. A simple answer is all that is required. Remember the old Ben Franklin quote: Keep your mouth shut and let them think you a fool rather than open it and tell them.
     
  14. oldgrad

    oldgrad Banned

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    hopefulfather, I am in complete agreement with your post. A big well done. If at least one of our newer readers comes away with a little more understanding of the OP's concerns and realize that it was not about a "free" education, it was well worth the effort. Welcome to the forums.
     
  15. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I'm not sure I got the idea that those posting about the "true" value of the education and not posting a dollar value were "belittling". When I read through the posts I got the feeling that they were simply expanding upon information already given and I did not feel their comments were necessarily directed towards the OP.

    I would suggest everyone go back and re-read the posts in the thread and if you still come away with the impression that they were berating the OP for asking a question then maybe my "tone of post" finder is off.
     
  16. skierxman

    skierxman Member

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    Hi Hopeful,

    My sincere apologies if my post came across in the wrong way. My intention was not to belittle the question and I understand the information is of importance to the public institutions who have pride in the kids they send off to the academy.

    I am a High School physics teacher and also hold the Science and Engineering career day in the early fall for Seniors and Juniors so I get these questions about the Service Academies quite a bit and I was going into that "response mode" I guess. Questions of financial aid always come up, as do the free nature of the Service Academies, and whenever I hear that I always automatically qualify the answers with, "The decision to attend should never be about the money."
     
  17. time2

    time2 Member

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    I am not quite sure where the wheels came off the track on this one. I really haven't read anything in this thread as belittling anyone. All have made great comments. The dollar value is certainly subject to interpretation on exactly how you calculate it. Several people have made excellent comments on what your true motivation to attend should be. I think all of those points were valid and no one was trying to put anyone else down by mentioning those things.
     
  18. xrunmariarunx

    xrunmariarunx Member

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    I apologize if I came off sounding like all I cared about was the dollar amount, but I was trying to get an answer for my counselor. I have sacrificed so much time and effort into getting into USNA, and I would gladly sarcrifice more because it's the place I want to be. The dollar amount means nothing to me; it's the whole USNA experience+ fulfilling my dream of becoming an officer that means the world to me. Sorry again.
     
  19. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    Spot on!

    Another point I'd like to add; at last years at Graduation, the Navy supplied a giant check made out to the recipient of the NROTC Scholarship, in the amount of $180,000 made out to the kid to show everyone at the ceremony his achievement. I thought it was a great motivator for all in attendance.
     
  20. Maui1

    Maui1 Member

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    Xrunmariarunix,

    You have absolutely nothing to apologize about. Your question was very clear and legitimate. Even if wanting to inquire as to how much the education is valued at simply for your own informational purposes whether it be for your counselor or being proud of your accomplishment is perfectly fine and acceptable. You did not sound like you were coming off with being concerned about the dollar amount at all. Have a great day.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009

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