Vision Waiver Possiblity

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by raulkingviera, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. raulkingviera

    raulkingviera Member

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    What are the chances of getting a waiver. Do the waivers differ depending on what vision requirement you don't meat. Also I have a "lazy eye" which is really bad. I mean its terrible. What are the chances of a waiver for someone with a lazy eye.
     
  2. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

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    ask Larry Muellen

    look at the dodmerb forum
    DON'T PM Him
    shoot an e-mail instead

    he really responds as quickly as he says
     
  3. raulkingviera

    raulkingviera Member

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    all i got from him was an attachment with the vision standards for each branch of the military. nothing about obtaining a waiver for vision.
     
  4. usna2012mom

    usna2012mom Member

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    The chances for a waiver are Zero if you do not apply. You do not have to have perfect vision, thus the standards that Mr. Mullen sent you. Apply, get your physical, and see what the docs say.
     
  5. navy2016

    navy2016 Member

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    as many times as i searched concerning waivers

    one thing is always emphasized

    it is on case by case basis


    my uncorrected vision is pretty bad too- i realized even if i do get into the academy, aviation is probably not in my future
    -4.0 and the worse allowed b4 waiver is like -6.0
     
  6. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    I don't know if I agree with that. It's a fair question raulkingviera is asking. I think it's worth getting an answer before throwing one's hat into the admission grind - especially if there is no question about the classification of the candidate's particular eye issue. For instance, is this just his personal assessment or has an ophthalmologist diagnosed this condition?

    There are some conditions for which no waiver is available. Who in the heck wants to go through all the hassle of collecting recommendations, writing essays, collecting information, getting teachers to fill-out online data, doing the CFA, conducting multiple interviews, and doing a medical exam only to discover that you were NEVER physically qualified in the first place? It was an impossibility from the word "Go."

    That time could have been better spent with other (more realistic) college pursuits.

    Now, if there is no documentation of this eye problem -and- if it has not been officially diagnosed and classified -or- if there is any doubt that the condition actually exists -or- that the condition is fixable -or- the DoDMERB's policy seems to leave room for such eye issues then, yes, it might be worth proceeding with the application process.

    Sure, roll the dice. See what happens.

    In years past (before corrective eye surgery was even on the radar), I used to have young kids come up to the flight deck, wearing thick glasses, asking, "How can I become a pilot? I want to be a Navy pilot."

    I had to break the news to them. At the time, the Navy didn't grant any waivers for visual acuity. It had to be 20/20 uncorrected vision. If you didn't have 20/20 uncorrected vision ... need naught apply. Don't even waste your time. The Air Force granted waivers, however. I would suggest that, perhaps, they could fly for the Air Force. Oftentimes they went away happy.

    raulkingviera has stated that he has a "lazy eye" and that it's "really bad." That being the case, I think his time would be well spent getting a definitive answer to his question before starting the application process to any service academy. If no definitive answer can be given then, perhaps, there is hope for his condition and it would be worth a shot.

    But there's no question about it - Larry Mullen is the guy to ask.
     
  7. 777flier

    777flier Member

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  8. usna2012mom

    usna2012mom Member

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  9. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    The discussion was interesting. The answers are:

    1) The one guarantee that an applicant will NOT receive a waiver is: the applicant does NOT apply to be a cadet/mishipman in an SA/ROTC program. All waivers in those situations are DENIED (Read that carefully:thumb:). No application = no waiver.

    2) "If" I was an applicant and was concerned whether or not I will receive a waiver or not, I apply.

    3) raulkingviera - You received the eye chart to confirm with your Optometrist/Opthalmologist as to whether in "their opinion," you meet or do not meet standards.

    4) For SAs, in order to be even considered for a medical waiver, you need to be competitive for an offer of appointment. That decision is made by the SA Admissions office. For 4 year ROTC, you already have been offerred a scholarship pending medical qualification or medical waiver. All 4 year applicants for ROTC programs are considered for a medical waiver automatically. For in-college ROTC applicants, medical waiver processing is determined by the Commander at the ROTC program (school).

    5) The above provides accurate information concerning waivers...the decision to medically waive is based on a case-by-case basis and the needs of the Service/program.:thumb:
     
  10. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    Read Mullen's entire post thoroughly. DoDMERB determines whether one meets thje standard. The individual SAs determine waivers. And like navy2016 pointed out, they are on a case by case basis. Unfortunately, USNA no longer has a senior medical officer on the Admissions staff. I know in past years, since they have lost the billet, they have farmed the waivers out to various people. BUMED. Medical staff at USNA. So the problem is to find the person who will answer a question at this point or even if they have yet been designated. 777flier found an 'expert'. Only an opinion. A better opinion than most. But if he had said 'no', knowing what I know, I would have still applied. Unfortunately, you will probably not get a definitive answer. Apply.
     
  11. raulkingviera

    raulkingviera Member

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    Thank you for clearing up my questions MullenLE. From what you guys are posting here I definitely want to apply to the SAs. Mainly USNA, but I know the other services are more lenient. Also I want to apply for the NASS. Do you have to meet the vision requirements to attend that, or if you are competitive academically you can attend the seminar.

    Again I want to greatly thank you guys for all the help. If I wouldn't have found this forum I would lost in the great place that is the internet with many of my questions unanswered.:thumb:
     

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