Waiver for asthma

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by fern2019, Sep 9, 2014.

  1. fern2019

    fern2019 Member

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    I understand that DoDMERB disqualifies and the service academies can either grant or not grant a waiver.
    I know that asthma is disqualifying... are waivers for asthma commonly granted, especially if it was childhood asthma? Does having a LOA factor into the decision of the service academy to give a waiver?
     
  2. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    The LOA usually states that appointment is contingent upon passing the medical exam. However, there's a strong likelihood that the SA will request a Waiver Authority review if an LOA is given.

    As for childhood asthma, here's a thread that addresses that.

    http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/archive/index.php/t-1288.html

    It appears that if there are no asthma symptoms after the age of 13, it's a nonissue.
     
  3. fern2019

    fern2019 Member

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    Thanks for the information. If an inhaler was prescribed at age 13, would that be an issue?
     
  4. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    I think it would depend on if he needed it after the age of 13. If he never used it, then I don't see any issue nor need to even disclose that. He didn't have the treatment.

    This is what I would do - If you can, get a letter from the doctor stating that he hasn't needed any asthma treatments since age 13, or before. Turn that in to DoDMERB *if* they request remedials.
     
  5. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    First, how you answer the question depends on how it is worded. If asked if an inhaler was prescribed at age 13 or later and it was, the answer would be "yes."

    My guess -- and it's ONLY that -- b/c I'm not a doctor is that Rx for an inhaler after age 13 will at least require a remedial. The bottom line is if your child does not have asthma, he/she will be fine. If there is "adult" asthma, it will be disqualifying and almost certain not to be waived.

    As to what will be required to demonstrate no asthma, I leave to others who've gone through the process. Just remember that every situation is different -- the fact that someone did or did not receive a waiver is not really relevant to your circumstance.
     
  6. fern2019

    fern2019 Member

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    How would I demonstrate that I have no asthma?
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Have you taken a spirometry test?

    When was the last time on your medical records you were prescribed an inhaler?

    You will fill out a medical history and be required to answer specific questions. Depending on how the exam goes they may decide to give you qualified, remedial or DQ.

    Remedial they will ask to see your medical records before they decide if you go Q or DQ.
    ~ The ability to provide a spirometry's test results can help.

    Ex.BT.USN will probably be the best poster resource for guidance, since his DS had the same concern last year and is now on NROTC scholarship.

    Understand that DoDMERB Qs or DQs, commissioning sources waive. Part of their decision will be based upon how your medical condition will impact the mission? Can they deploy you to forward bases/posts with limited medical supplies? Will your medical condition impact your ability for career positions? Can you only fulfill specific fields because of your medical issues?
     
  8. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent Member

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    Asthma

    Fern,

    Every case is different. Complete the forms honestly and fully. But don't answer questions not asked.

    We were successful on the Asthma topic (exercise induced) by completing the secondary form they give you when you say Yes to asthma.

    We identified last date of prescription which was one month prior to 13th birthday along with a statement that the prescription was precautionary for use prior to exercise and that it was not used. We gave the name and address of the prescribing physician. We identified all athletics done from age 13 through Jr Yr of HS. Cross Country, Club, and Varsity Soccer with no use of the inhaler. We had the pediatrician medical records to submit if necessary though they never requested them.

    They will ask for more information or test results if necessary. In our case they wanted the lab results for a surgically removed growth. They did not request further information on the Asthma.

    Good luck
     
  9. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    For the record, I was not saying to lie on the medical form.

    Of course, be honest. I know of a cadet who was recently disenrolled from USAFA for not being honest on the medical form.

    I only meant that if the questions are about specific treatments that were received, then answer that way. Let the DoDMet doctor know about the prescription and that it was never used. They makes notes on the forms when they submit them.
     

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