!!!Warning!!!

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by Chockstock, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. Chockstock

    Chockstock "Forever One Team"

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    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/01/31/health/main327664.shtml

    I've been considering getting LASIK if I joined the Army (I've always hated the idea of joining with peepers - not to mention how uncomfortable they are). But this article is giving me second thoughts. I know its almost 10 years old, but I cant help but wonder if the contents of it are true. LASIK doesn't have 100% satisfaction from its customers for sure, and it is kind of scary to read about the possible long term effects. This might be an interesting read for those considering LASIK. Whether its true or not, I would hate to see anyone on the forums or anyone else have eye problems in the future or even have immediate problems as some do with LASIK.

    But DAMN. It sucks. Now I cant get LASIK anymore because Im too scared!! I absolutely HATE how my eyes are bad and its not even my fault (its genetic).


    Here is the story for those of you too lazy to click on the link :rolleyes:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 17, 2010
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Sensationalized topic for an article that has only little to do with today's refractive surgery.

    A few points:
    1)Refractive surgery has come quite a long way over the last decade. There are now various iterations of LASIK which include wave-front, femtosecond lasers, custom-guided, etc which have produced a reduction in the number of post-operative complications

    2)Vision Guarantees - you are remiss to think that anyone can guarantee you anything when it comes to outcomes in medicine. There are too many variables and too much variation to anatomy to have this. Do most people improve their vision to 20/20 or better, yes. Do some need repeat operations, yes. Do some people forever continue to need glasses, yes.

    3)Halo's and Starbursts at night - can still happen, not as often, but are still known possible 'complications' of the surgery.

    4)Reading Glasses - LASIK is not meant to correct those who need reading glasses. Most people need reading glasses later in life because the ability to "accomodate" (the action needed to read close in) becomes less as you age. (Remember when you were young and could read a paper that was basically held to your nose??? Try it now and notice that you actually need to hold it a few inches away now, this is the beginning of this loss) Those who are near-sighted actually need reading glasses less than those with normal vision due to the optics of the eye. If you now take that eye and make it "normal" through surgery you are going to need reading glasses basically at the same rate as those with "normal" eyes from birth.

    5)"People who never should have this surgery are getting it done" - true. Refractive surgery is a pure cash cow. There are many reputable refractive surgery centers and there are a handful that are a bit more lax. Go visit multiple places/surgeons/doctors before deciding on the right place for you.

    6)Overall Risk assessment: overall LASIK in today's world is a safe procedure. There are potentials for complications such as difficulty at night and the need for repeat procedures. The higher your prescription the more likely you are to have some of the complications. Discuss all of these with your potential surgeon and if you don't like the answers stick with glasses. They don't hurt you, they work, and you don't introduce the risk of surgery. If you are willing to take the risk the probable outcome is a good one.

    (BTW, I know plenty of doctors and optometrists who have had this procedure done. I also know a ton of pilots and navigators who have had it done)
     
  3. Eagle 1

    Eagle 1 Member

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    I had a pretty good conversation with the interviewing officer for my AFROTC scholarship and the regional director of admissions (they both happen to be in the same building), and it has taken a huge weight off my shoulders to find out that I can gain a pilot slot in AFROTC, and get LASIK (or PRK - one was preferred over the other for some reason - I'm going to look that one up again to be sure) after done by the Air Force.

    I'm currently correctable to 20/20, but my vision is actually around 20/200, which...is bad...

    Hopefully by the time I (and many of us) get this done, the process will be even safer than it is now.
     
  4. Kero

    Kero Member

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    Air Force perfers LASIK
    Navy perfers PRK (looking into LASIK don't know if its been approved yet)

    But as for getting it early, be careful because at least for the Navy if you get PRK or LASIK on your own, regardless of what your vision is, you are NPQ'ed for aviation.
     
  5. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    LASIK for Navy is currently in the infancy stages, they are allowing it, but only if performed at NMC San Diego or NMC Portsmouth and only under very strict guidelines.

    Absolutely 100% accurate. If you want to be a pilot/nfo in the Navy don't even think about getting surgery prior to entry.
     

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