Well wishes to 2017 plebe summer

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by CSGuy, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. CSGuy

    CSGuy Class of 2016

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Congratulations to those of you who will be joining us in a few days -- kick up some dust during Plebe summer and get ready to meet your new family on August 16th.

    -semper youngster-
     
  2. Jake

    Jake Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just found out that DS is in 18th company. What can you tell me about their traditions, rules, etc.

    Thanks!
     
  3. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    735
    Likes Received:
    79
    Company patch features some sort of demented squirrel.
     
  4. CSGuy

    CSGuy Class of 2016

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know much about 18, which is typically a good thing. Pretty sure they live in the goat court with the rest of 4th batt.
     
  5. LetsFly

    LetsFly '17

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    anything on 20?
     
  6. CSGuy

    CSGuy Class of 2016

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2012
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    20th company is cool. My friends told me that plebe training in 20 was not nearly as rough as in 21st.
     
  7. OysterMom

    OysterMom Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    What makes training in 21st comparatively "rough"?
     
  8. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    16
    The relative nature of one company over any other is largely in the degree to which the company members, especially plebes, are held to the letter of plebe or other class rates. It also used to be a matter of how seriously the company took its role in preparing its members to become officers and in doing their best in meeting obligations and expectations. It was something that passed down primarily from the upper classmen. It also was a reflection of the Company Officer's interpretation of his role in molding the midshipmen under his command.
     
  9. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    16
    Congratulations to the members of the incoming Class of 2017; the fun is about to begin! One big thing to keep in mind as you become a midshipman is that the job of the detailers is to whip you into functioning members of the Brigade. The sooner you show them that you are capable of meeting those expectations, the sooner they will back away and find the poor, misguided dufus who still thinks his/her role is to change the Brigade to something "nicer". My insight comes from a summer as a detailer, plus several years in the fleet as a junior officer.
     
  10. OysterMom

    OysterMom Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Got it. Short-term pain for longer-term gain, in theory and, I would hope, in practice. Thanks for the experienced answer. My DD is in 21st, so I had to ask :smile:
     
  11. LongAgoPlebe

    LongAgoPlebe Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    386
    Likes Received:
    369
    It wasn't until many years after my own plebe summer that I realized the single best lesson I learned that summer - among many, many of them, some of which follow me to the geezer age of 41 - was the habit and practice of what I'll call mindfulness.

    Mindful people pay attention. If you adopt and practice this habit early, you will recognize that detailers are (largely) okay with mistakes that arise when you try something new and fail, but they hate so-called stupid mistakes: the ones made out of a failure to learn from your own or others' mistakes or repeated mistakes. These always arise from someone(s) not paying attention, rather than the process of learning new skills.

    Mindful people observe everything they can: detailers, peers, routines. They are early to formations and meetings. They do their best to observe what others (squad, platoon) are doing in the moments before a deadline and assist them to be early too. Mindful people learn vicariously. If your swim buddy puts out a paw fingers up and gets flamed for it, you put out your paw fingers down.

    Mindful people anticipate and plan. If you know that one of your training evolutions tomorrow is swim, you make sure you have your suit and towel ready to go in this evening's prep. You plan your week's laundry so that you have a clean blue rim to wear under white works for the day's training (wear the smelly one to PEP).

    Above all, mindful people are observing themselves and making adjustments all the time. They recognize when they are tuned out and immediately tune back in. They recognize when they are tired, hot, thirsty, frustrated and take a mental or physical breath. They make commitments and set goals, and they resolve to carry through in spite of their fears, emotions, or physical limitations or risks. They recognize, and remind themselves, that nothing is permanent. They recognize that even they are not going to be perfect, and they learn a habit of after-action evaluation to dispassionately assess what worked and what did not, and what they will do in the future. They stretch to overcome their own limitations by placing themselves in situations where they can be tested and strengthened, over and over.

    Mindful people adopt these and other practices because they work, not because someone makes them do it. They are, above all, internally motivated and driven. For these reasons, mindful people succeed where others who are physically stronger, intellectually smarter, socially savvier fail. Be that person.
     
  12. Dial the gate

    Dial the gate Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2013
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    16
    LongAgoPlebe,

    That is brilliant. So very well said. Thank you!
     
  13. starbuck

    starbuck Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    8
    Any info about the 3rd Company? Third Herd
     
  14. fishbowl

    fishbowl Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    There's a reason they call it "No fun 21", but my now-Firstie says that its just that 21 tends to hold traditions more dear than most other companies. In those precious minutes that you have with your Plebe between swearing in and their disappearance into Bancroft for six weeks, try and focus on the positives from the day. They'll be a little shell-shocked, so don't let them start dwelling on the negative. They're starting out on a great adventure, one that thousands before them have survived, and numerous have thrived. Blink, and you'll be where I am - proud parent of a Firstie at the United State Naval Academy.
     
  15. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    121
    Good post by LongAgoPlebe. Though this might be kind of a bummer, I'll add something else.

    The Naval Academy will disappoint you. It very well may happen over Plebe Summer. You may realize that not all of your classmates are 2400 SAT Football heroes, and you may realize that not all of your detailers are future SEAL-astronauts who set a perfect example in everything they do.

    Both your peers and your detailers are human, and it shouldn't be a shocker that both will make mistakes, some of which will probably having you seeing red over how petty or unfair something seems.

    Take the negative with the positive and remember than just because you were let down or disappointed or feel cheated in some way by your upperclass it NEVER entitles you to do the same to your underclass, who will watch you just as closely as you watch 2014 and 2015.
    Learn from their mistakes and take notes on what you think could have been better ways to handle different situations. You may find, as I did, that your perspective changes once you get to be a big bad 1/C, but that some things are wrong regardless. Once you get into a position to change things, which you will, do so. Don't fall prey to cynicism, even as a plebe or youngster you can be a force for good in your company, sport, or ECA.

    Keep the faith. Remember why you came to USNA and what about the sea services attracted you in the first place. I've been a completely average 2ndLt doing nothing of actual significance for the past year (actually less than average since I'm still a couple years out from the fleet) so take my wors with a grain of salt but even at its most miserable this job is totally worth it. I have classmates deployed around the world now as Navy and Marine Officers and even when the day to day sucks I don't think any of them would change a thing. I've heard "I have the best job in the world" or "I have the best Sailors/Marines in the service" so many times its almost cliche.

    Work your *** off, take risks, and don't be afraid to volunteer. It's not for you: every learning experience you gain at USNA is a potential boon to your future Sailors and Marines. And at the end of the day they deserve nothing less than your absolute best.
     
  16. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    1
    Best of luck to all of the soon to be plebes, you'll all do great. Just remember to have fun. :wink:
     

Share This Page