Why the Navy can't beat piracy, but the Coast Guard might.

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by LineInTheSand, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Interesting Newsweek article someone passed on to me at work today. The author, a retired Navy commander is saying things that have been said here for awhile, and he brings up some good points. Enjoy the read!


    http://www.newsweek.com/id/194185
     
  2. Viper56

    Viper56 Member

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    I'm just a gun-toting, bible-clinging joe-baga-donuts fighter pilot who's certainly no expert in maritime operations; however, I don't see this as a particularly difficult problem providing you have a commander-in-chief who's got a couple of brass ones and isn't afraid to be arrogant and act like a bully.

    Here's my solution: Have the US Navy sink the "mother ship", where these pirates (aka Merchant Marine Organizers to EIB listeners) launch their attacks on Commercial Ships. These high seas terrorists operate hundreds of miles of the coast of Somalia carry out their attacks in very small boats and need a larger vessel for logistical support. Of course, we would have to show some sensitivity and give the mother ship crew time to surrender and abandon ship before sending it to the bottom of the Indian Ocean. And in the last line of defense, F/A-18 pilots would love strafing a skiff loaded with pirates that gets too close to a Merchant ship.

    The problem with this solution is that the current administration sees piracy on the high seas as a criminal offense (not much different than robbing a 7/11) as opposed to an act of war. Fox News analyst and NY Times best-selling author, Dick Morris states that the current administration views terrorism (aka man-caused disasters) as a game of "cops and robbers."
     
  3. toddman10

    toddman10 USMMA Midshipman

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    Back to the begining

    From a historical standpoint the Navy was created to combat the Barbary Pirates, to me it seems only logical that the Navy take an active roll in the type of conflict that pushed congress to authorize an United State Navy.
     
  4. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Because the Navy has absolutely no law enforcement authority.
     
  5. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    Global application of Posse Comitatus?

    We are the "worlds policemen" but can't really be that! :shake:
     
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Basically, with some exceptions. There are LEDET teams on some Naval vessels however for that purpose.
     
  7. jbrown

    jbrown Member

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    It's easy. Congress should just repeat history and declare war on piracy. I know a few Marines who would be willing to solve this during their leave.

    War can, and has been declared on piracy. It changes the whole "law enforcement" requirement thing. If you even have to have law enforcement. Treat it as it is, terrorism on the seas.
     
  8. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Or, just continue using LEDETs on naval vessels.

    First, I thought it was interesting because it was on Newsweek, but when I figured out it was a retired Navy commander, that made it even more interesting. The article was fairly short though. I wasn't able to see if it was internet only, or if it was in the 'zine. There was a typo I caught in there.
     

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