Writing sample for re-applicant

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Patriot2119, Aug 26, 2015.

  1. Patriot2119

    Patriot2119 Member

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    The first prompt in the writing sample page is, "Describe a setback or ethical dilemma that you have faced. How did you resolve it? How did the outcome affect you? Most importantly, what did you learn about yourself and how would you handle a similar situation in the future? (400 to 500 words, 3000 characters max)"

    As a reapplicant, is it fine (and should I), to use the same thing I wrote last year? I'm not trying to be lazy, and don't want to come across that way but the issue I wrote about last year is the "biggest" setback/ethical dilemma I've faced, and probably the best handled.
     
  2. FalconsRock

    FalconsRock Parent

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    Patriot, hats off to you for re-applying. Perhaps you could use the same essay, but what about a new one regarding your setback of not receiving an appointment to the Academy; the disappointment of rejection and how it affected you and the steps you took/are taking to overcome and make yourself more competitive this time. I am certain you learned much about yourself during the past year and that growth would make for an impressive essay indeed. Good luck to you.
     
  3. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Just my $0.3495939. (From a "Psychology" perspective, and knowing human nature as I do)

    What a perfect opportunity to use this essay ( a set back, how you resolved it, how it affected you, what you learned about yourself, etc.), to discuss what it was like to "NOT RECEIVE AN APPOINTMENT" last year. And everything you're going through and doing to improve your chances are THIS YEAR.

    It's a legitimate topic.... It shows "Real World" adapting and overcoming..... It throws another bug/reminder in the minds of the selection board that you are "RE-APPLYING". And it demonstrates that when things don't go your way, that you're not a quitter.

    Just my opinion. Remember, the selection board is made up of "PEOPLE". A computer doesn't choose you. Use this to your advantage. best of luck. Mike.
     
  4. Patriot2119

    Patriot2119 Member

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    Of course, I should have thought of that... Thanks Falcons and Christcorp. Much appreciated.
     
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  5. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    I wasn't trying to step on falcon rock. We were probably typing at the same time. When I read the op, there weren't any replies yet.

    But that goes to show what an obvious topic it would be. I definitely recommend going with that.
     
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  6. Subtle

    Subtle Member

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    Question that (kind of?) also falls under the same topic. I'm a reapplicant as well and am in the process of writing my essays but I have a choice to make: as an Airman, I've had a superintendent at the head of my shop for the last year that's been personally abusive to me and I'm doing what I should've done months ago and lodging a complaint with the IG. It's been a tough process and I'd planned to focus on the overcoming fear of retribution/reprisal aspect for my essay- would it be more prudent to write about my second time applying instead?
     
  7. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    I don't want this to sound hypocritical, because it isn't, but I wouldn't "Air Dirty Laundry" in the open. Even if it's just to a selection board for the academy.

    If it was something from the "Past", that would probably be ok. But what you're talking about is something that is "Currently" in affect. The fact that you're an airman and you're talking about a military problem to a military board you're trying to get favor with, is also a side reason not to.

    But for what it's worth, I'd say the say exact thing to a civilian. EXAMPLE: If you wanted to talk about an abusive parent that happened when you were younger, and the abusive parent either got help or is no longer in the family; then that would be fine. If you're wanting to talk about an abusive parent who is "CURRENTLY" abusing you, then that is NOT FINE. You're handling the issue, that's good. But keep the handling and process private.

    So, to answer your question. Choosing the "Re-application" as a topic is a great idea. Writing about a "Current" situation that you are trying to work out, is never a good idea.
     
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  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I would add my psychology perspective too in regards to using the old essay. What makes you think that last years essay was seen as amazing and all inspiring by them? For all you know they may have seen it as blah! Just saying it is something to think about.
     
  9. MombaBomba

    MombaBomba Member

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    SubtleSealy,

    Cristcorp is right on with this. During a college app seminar we attended with our eldest son (traditional college route), one of the things discussed was the "challenge to over come or hardship" type essays. They said whenever writing about it

    1) It needs to be a past a event. If you are still dealing with it as you write it, then you have yet to over come it; you are still in the "handling" phase.
    2) Don't let it turn into a "poor me" essay. The emphasis should be on what was done to over come and what was learned and not on the actual event itself.
    3) Don't get mired in negativity. This can signal not having really gotten past or fully dealing with a situation. It can come across as if you still have baggage (negative) as opposed to gaining a new life lesson or skill(positive)
    4) Admit any fault or contribution to the situation if appropriate. No one is fault free. We do make mistakes that can contribute to a situation or make it worse. We can also initially miss-handle the situation, as it can take time to find the right way of dealing with it. It's not about the mistake, its about correcting and learning from the mistake.
    5) Don't poop where you eat. Don't write about a highly charged and/or highly controversial situation and submit it for review by any organization involved.
    6) Stay away from politics
    7) Adding humor is not necessarily a bad thing. However, it should be appropriate and within context. Also, what one finds funny, another can find offensive. So use it in terms of adding flavor (metaphors, similes, etc..) if and when **appropriate**. My eldest enjoys adding some humor to his writings, so advice on this was sought.

    Good luck with your essays!

    Opps...almost forgot. Know your audience! Realize who you are writing this for. Your audience can influence how you deliver your message.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
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  10. Subtle

    Subtle Member

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    Christcorp, Momba, your advice is, as always, enlightening and very much appreciated. I wasn't thinking about this from any other perspective than my own- reapplication it is. (And thank you for the tips!) :wiggle:
     
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