2 Tickets Affecting Appointment?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by USNA2023NJ, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. USNA2023NJ

    USNA2023NJ New Member

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    Hi, I was offered an LOA and eventually received an offer of appointment to USNA class of 2023. Unfortunately, last night I received 2 tickets, one for probationary license violation (i was driving past 11 pm) and 1 for careless driving (speeding and my friend stuck his head out of the window without my knowledge in front of a cop). Does anyone know if this will affect my appointment to the academy? And if I go to court to plead not guilty and get one of the tickets overturned will I still have to report both? And who do I report this to, my BGO or my admission counselor?
     
  2. CallSignGaspar

    CallSignGaspar Member

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    I don't have the information to be telling you what to do; although, this news needs to reach both your BGO and admission counselor. You've received an appointment which then leaves them with the decision to keep the appointment or pull it out of your hands. Good luck!
     
  3. THParent

    THParent Member

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    I am curious as to which citation you are not guilty of? Clearly, you were out driving past 11PM. Is it your contention that you were not speeding? You would need some proof of that, especially if there is radar evidence to the contrary.
    No one here can tell you with certainty as to how USNA is going to react to this news. Just face up to it and let the chips fall as they may. My guess is that it will be okay.
     
  4. A1Janitor

    A1Janitor Member

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    Contact a lawyer and get them reduced to a smaller offense.

    And grow up.
     
  5. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    Your Permission to Report packet will include a form that will need to be completed by local law enforcement, confirming that you’re “clean.” So one way or another, USNA will know what’s going on.

    I believe it’s wise to defend yourself in court, as our Constitution allows. I also believe it’s wise to get ahead of issues and to be honest and forthcoming. You can do both. It may affect your offer of appointment, it may not. But if nothing else, it should teach you a lesson. The term “bubble wrap” does include silly and stupid acts that can endanger appointment.
     
  6. swrakow

    swrakow Member

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    You must report the citations to admissions, but make sure they know you've been cited and not yet convicted. Next, hire a lawyer well versed in handling these types of cases. He or she might be able to get the case dismissed or get the state to agree to a disposition that doesn't result in a conviction. Then follow up with admissions once things are resolved. Minor traffic violations should have no effect on the offer of appointment unless you conceal them.
     
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  7. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Just because you can do something, doesn't mean that it's the ethical thing to do.
    Getting an Attorney involved so that you don't have to take responsibility for your actions is not the course which I would espouse, to a future officer in the Navy or Marine Corps.
     
  8. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    I’m with @THParent. When I said defend yourself in court, I meant by yourself, not with a lawyer in tow. It’s a traffic ticket, not an arrest for breaking and entering.

    My DD was in a fender bender. Though it was a low-speed crash with no injuries, it was her fault. She faced the judge, admitted her guilt, did the assigned community service, learned an enduring lesson about taking responsibility for your actions.
     
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  9. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    If alcohol was not involved, it's not likely to affect your appointment. You need to report it to USNA if something you receive in your PTR tells you to do it. I'm not aware of any affirmative obligation to report tickets, but I also haven't read the PTR, so will defer to that.

    Whether you need a lawyer depends on what the potential punishment is. These sound like misdemeanors, which means fines and/or points on your license. Your parents can sort this out -- those of us here who don't have the facts can't offer you (good) legal advice.

    Hopefully, this was a lesson learned. This sort of thing, as a mid or especially as an officer, will be a bigger deal. Time to start growing up.
     
  10. swrakow

    swrakow Member

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    How is getting an attorney involved not taking responsibility? That's the best way to handle the situation and may result in an outcome appropriate for the actions. Did you not see the point made about reporting the citations? You obviously have no idea how matters are handled by attorneys, prosecutors, and the courts. Many, many minor cases like this end up dismissed or with community service. Often courts will fashion a disposition that is appropriate given the offender's prior record - meaning no conviction. How the case ends up has nothing to do with taking responsibility or not and everything to do with this kid being treated fairly and appropriately by the system.

    As an attorney, I make sure my clients get the outcome they should get. That means working with the State and the court - often something one can't do representing themselves. I would rather tell the court how great the kid is and how much he's learned from the incident than have the kid show up on his own and get a huge fine and points when he didn't need to. And I've helped many mids and future mids.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  11. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    Some of the advice you are getting here is good. Some is just wrong. I don't think you need an attorney out of the gate. Call the ticketing officer, and ask him if you can come meet with him. Be contrite and tell him your circumstances. Offer community service. Ask him if he will talk to the judge. Don't ask to get rid of the ticket. He may do that on his own, but don't ask. If he does, then you ask him to pick a community service project for you. You need consequences.

    Most law enforcement officers are good folks. Lots of them work with kids.

    Don't BS the guy. They've heard it all. Don't blame your friend. You were the driver. You were responsible.

    I really don't think a lawyer helps you here. Work through these people. Accept responsibility and fix this yourself.

    And yes you need to act better, but the dumbest thing on the planet is a teenage boy. (Meanest is a teenage girl.) You were a knucklehead. Smarten up.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  12. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    Well I certainly know how these things work, and I would absolutely hold off on a lawyer until I tried to work with the ticketing officer. I've seen that work more times than I can count.
     
  13. swrakow

    swrakow Member

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    Really? Are you an attorney? I am. You don't "work with the ticketing officer" - at least not in Maryland.
     
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  14. A1Janitor

    A1Janitor Member

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    This might be a state or local difference. We can’t assume what works in your locality or state works in all localities or states.
     
  15. swrakow

    swrakow Member

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    I'm also aware that NJ is a lot tougher than MD.
     
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  16. A1Janitor

    A1Janitor Member

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    You got nothing on New York! ;)
     
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  17. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    Believe me. I could tell you are an attorney. And you sealed that conclusion by asking me if I am. For 30 years. And you absolutely can do that in SC. Is there a specific rule in Md prohibiting talking to the ticketing officer?

    Not everything in our world requires formality and lawyers, but thanks for flashing the law license.
     
  18. A1Janitor

    A1Janitor Member

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    Good catch.

    He also explained he was an attorney several posts earlier before you came to your conclusion.
     
  19. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    And you can't assume it doesn't. It works easily here in Lexington, SC. Not so easily in Hardeeville, SC, unless you're local. Not easily in Statesville, NC, or Athens, Ga, but quite well in Clarke County, Ga.
     
  20. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    Car crashes are the leading cause of death in the US for teenagers. We are approaching the period when the most accidents occur. From the time flowers bloom and birds sing, until high school graduation and starting college, hundreds of young and inexperienced drivers will die.

    Be safe young lady, be safe.

    I have no advice on the tickets.
     
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