ADHD & DoDMERB

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by shast, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. shast

    shast Member

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    Question... My parents made me see a neurologist a couple of years ago to get a diagnosis of ADD to try for a testing accommodation (I was against this). From friends, they found a Dr. of questionable ethics who gave me a diagnosis after 1 visit and a brainwave Test, which was normal. He prescribed medication which was filled once, but never taken. I was denied the testing accommodation, and that was the end of that. When I was filling out my DoDMERB form I forgot about this. Will this be a problem? My grades have never suffered? I have my exam scheduled soon. Should I postpone and contact a DoDMERB consultant?

    Looking for some advice here, like I said, I was against this. Thank you... Really Worried.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2018
  2. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Well yes, it is a problem.

    If you were diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder and you don't have it, your parents did you no help whatsoever there.
    The issue is that it is on record somewhere and is no doubt easy to find, as they check your medical records.

    Now, the good news is that you never took the drug, but the bad news is that you filled the prescription. So really, you can't prove that you never took the drug.
    Here's some other good news; If you haven't taken any medication for ADD in a year or more AND have excelled academically during that time, even if you are disqualified, a waiver may very well be granted.

    What follows here is what I would do in your position, so it's just my opinion from my little uninformed point of view.
    I would go to the physical and tell the doctor what happened. Tell the doctor that for whatever reason, your parents made you see this other doctor, BUT you never took the drugs.
    Not only did you never take the drugs, but you have excelled academically since then (I am going to assume that you have) and this whole thing was because of your well-meaning but over-protective parents.

    Or something like that.
     
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  3. shast

    shast Member

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    Thank you. I didn’t mention it on my DoDMERB form because while I was wracking my brain to go back through my medical history I honestly didn’t even think of it, and you are correct it was well intended by my parents, but I was against it. Can I amend my form while speaking to the Dr?
     
  4. THParent

    THParent Member

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    That I do not know.

    If you think it was "a couple of years ago", what you really need to come up with was the exact date you met with the doctor, the records of the test they performed (can the test that was performed even accurately measure ADD?) and when you filled that prescription. If you still had the bottle and the count of pills is the same as the day you got it, even better.
     
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  5. shast

    shast Member

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    I’ll look for it.... I’ll get the exact dates for them, and Dr. I’m assuming they shared the report with my pediatrician...
     
  6. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    Something isn't adding up here ......your parents "made you see a neurologist a couple years ago" , you were against it, you didn't take the prescribed pills....and you don't recall this while wracking your brain remembering your medical history. Unless you have a whole lot of other significant medical issues, I would think this would be at the forefront of your thoughts.

    Your parents found a doctor with "questionable ethics" ? Are you a Doctor , what makes you think the Doctor's ethics were questionable?
    Did you tell the Doctor that you were against medication and testing accomodations ?

    Instead of pointing fingers at parents, doctors, etc -- this is your responsibility. What was it that caused your parents to want to take you to the doctor in the first place ? Your record has the medical diagnosis and request for accommodations, and you can rest assured there is a paper trail out there. It is important that you set the record straight, and if appropriate, purse the waiver and see where it goes.

    Sorry if I come off harsh, but this is one area that is kind of a pet peeve. I have family in education, and some indirect experience with the subject. I am certainly not an expert, but have opinions about the whole ADD/drugs/accommodation thing. I get it in the education context, but real life doesn't grant accommodations, and in the Navy, the cover up of a medical condition can kill people.
     
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  7. shast

    shast Member

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    You didn’t come across as harsh, and given the way I presented my situation I don’t blame you. I do not have ADHD, and will handle the situation with DoDMERB honestly. I have no physical conditions that would preclude me from service. I’m hoping after I explain the situation to the DoD Dr. it won’t be a problem.
     
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  8. mgreen

    mgreen Member

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    I'm not wading into the discussion about what you should have reported or should report during your DoDMERB exam. This is for the OP to decide.

    One point of correction regarding the statement,
    .

    This is incorrect, your medical records are confidential and protected by law under HIPPA. Disclosing Protected Health Information (PHI) without your consent is a serious breach of the law with significant consequences. This applies to all forms of health records including electronic, paper, or oral. Under the law, PHI includes:
    • the individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition,
    • the provision of health care to the individual, or
    • the past, present, or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual,
    Only you or your parents, if you are under 18 years old, can release your medical records. Of course, if you are given a remedial by DoDMERB, you may be asked to produce medical records, but again this is up to you.
     
  9. Humey

    Humey Member

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    I have always wondered how that works. I mean if you have seen the same doctor for the last 20 years and you saw a specialist for something like this , when they ask for your medical records, you will only present the records of doctor you have seen all your life . Any other misc doctor you may have seen won’t show up anywhere
     
  10. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Not to be obstinate here, but in the military, you have a lot fewer rights.

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) permits protected health information (PHI) of Armed Forces personnel to be disclosed under special circumstances. Commonly referred to as the Military Command Exception, covered entities such as military treatment facilities may disclose the PHI of Armed Forces personnel to Command authorities for authorized activities. These activities include fitness for duty determinations, fitness to perform a particular assignment, or other activities necessary for the military mission. PHI disclosed to military command authorities, while no longer subject to HIPAA, remains protected under the Privacy Act of 1974.

    This is just my opinion mind you, but it is better just to assume that they will independently check into everything about you, and just tell the truth and give them all the information that you have.
    That way, you don't have to remember what you "forgot to tell them" later.
     
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  11. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    If you were diagnosed with ADHD by a physician, then you "had" ADHD. If a physician has not subsequently indicated that the condition has resolved or that you longer have it, then you still "have" ADHD. Whether you think you had/have it or whether you think the doctor was an idiot is irrelevant. The key is whether you were given a diagnosis by a physician or other health care provider. Thus, if the DODMERB form says "do you have or have you ever had (or been diagnosed with) ADHD" and you received a diagnosis at any point, the answer is "yes."

    If a diagnosis resulted in accommodations at school, that could well be in school records. Not sure of that. Also, teachers might comment on it in their recommendations. Thus, there are ways other than one's medical records that this could come to light.

    A diagnosis of ADHD isn't fatal to a USNA application. As stated above, you have to be off meds and without special accommodations for a specified period of time and demonstrate you can do well under those circumstances. [Filling a prescription could lead to a presumption the medication was used.] If you've never taken ADHD meds and never had any special accommodations and have done well, it could be that is all you need to demonstrate. You will need to consult DODMERB and/or the medical folks at USNA (NOT your BGO) for details.
     
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  12. GHTeam

    GHTeam Member

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    I know this must be a tough situation. What was the pediatrician’s involvemevt in this supposed diagnosis, if any? The reason why I’m asking is wouldn’t the pediatrician have been the primary point of initial contact for exploring ADHD? It’s my understanding that evaluations would be first conducted at that level (including forms completed by teachers & parents evaluating behaviors, etc.) and then an appointment regarding results would occur before referring it out to a specialist. Did that step in the process take place? I think there’s more work to be done on this prior to your DoDMERB appointment. If that step with your pediatrician never occurred or if your pediatrician never agreed to this diagnosis, I think I’d go prepared with a statement or supporting documentation from the pediatrician to that appointment stating the facts. This is only my opinion...I am not a medical professional, but if I were in your shoes, I’d want to have something in hand to validate. Hang in there and best wishes!