ADHD post DODMERB

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by rotckid19, Jun 9, 2019.

  1. rotckid19

    rotckid19 New Member

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    I'm starting ROTC next fall and think I may have undiagnosed ADHD (runs in my family) but was never checked because I performed well academically. I don’t want medicine but I was wondering if seeking any kind of non medicinal help would be an issue for ROTC.
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army 5-Year Member

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    Yes...any accommodations will usually result in DQ for what they call academic skills disorder. I would recommend if you can do without the help don’t ask for it if you want to be an Officer. You should have been asked about academic issues on your medical history for your DODMERB.
    Your contract will require you to report if there is any change to your medical status that may disqualify you and require you to report any changes. Starting meds or receiving accommodations would require you to let someone know about your situation and may require a medical determination.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
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  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Do not self-diagnose. If a doctor say you have it, then you have it and you also have issues with becoming an officer.
    My Dad had Parkinsons and died from it. Sometimes I think I have it mainly because I have a family history. I have not been diagnosed and do not plan to self-diagnose. When a doctor tells me I have it because he checked since I was "having issues" then, and only then, will I have Parkinsons.
     
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  4. rotckid19

    rotckid19 New Member

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    By no means would I put anything down on paper I haven’t been diagnosed by a doctor with, it’s just been based on some struggles academically! I wasn’t going to bother going into a doctors office *if* it would be a problem unless I think I’m going to fail out of college... if it wouldn’t be a big deal to talk with a doctor about ways to deal with it (most of my family isn’t on meds) then I’d like to at least see if it’s anything. Make sense?
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    First I'm confused. You never got it checked because you performed well academically but you are now having academic issues.
    In any case, it only makes sense if you want to establish whether you have it or not. In order to treat it, even without meds, you have to establish what IT is. In any case your health is always the primary concern so if it needs to be addressed it needs to be addressed.
     
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  6. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Agree with @kinnem, if you did well academically in high school, then why are you looking for solutions now before you even start college?

    I recommend:
    1. Be prepared for college to work twice as hard as HS (it IS harder).
    2. Spend the summer preparing for the appropriate fitness test for ROTC. (work out at least 3x a week).
    3. Live on campus but don't get distracted by the party scene.
    4. Develop a fixed routine to study EACH DAY in a good study environment.
    5. Hook up with study groups to hold yourself accountable.
    6. Avoid taking on a PT job at least the first year.
    7. Focus on ROTC obligations and excelling in your classes.
    8. Communicate frequently with your instructors. Use office hours to clarify things you don't understand.
    9. If you fall behind DON'T assume that meds will solve your problem.
    10. Use the school resource center (tutoring, study skills etc.). You can get help without meds.
    11. Have fun this summer, then jump in with both feet in the fall.
    All this works. I know because I was diagnosed as an adult with ADHD, but still earned a BA and a Masters, without meds.
     
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  7. Dckc88

    Dckc88 Member

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    Use any resources on campus to help with academic issues (not relating to your possible concern, but available to all students)
    -If your ROTC unit offers tutoring - use it
    -Any study hall hours required, stay focused with an agenda for yourself, and use that time
    -Use your college academic center to help with organizational skills
    -Get an academic planner, AND USE IT! Putting any due dates, ROTC obligations, school obligations, etc in the planner. When feeling distracted, review what is important in that moment and in the coming days and focus on
    those things.

    Basically, becoming a college student is an adjustment. Make adjusting to being a college student your focus and limit distractions from non essential things until you become more settled at school. Yes’m having fun is important, but schedule that in your planner also. I know that sounds a little over the top, but I have learned that high performers do that, even if they don’t have a challenge focusing. And as a high school senior, having a problem focusing means you are perfectly normal! I would not seek any medical help, or self treat with anything without trying normal organizations skills and learn how to priority and make informed decisions about how to best use your time!
     
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  8. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    I doubt you have any more ADHD than the average staff-level O-6....
     
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  9. Magna Venari

    Magna Venari Member

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    If you suspect you have ADHD, you need to learn to coping skills now. Adapt, improvise, overcome. (Long, but worth the read)

    As an adult with diagnosed ADHD, learn to organize yourself and become OCD about it. Develop schedules, use a calendar of sorts and revolve around it. Put assignment, drills, uniform inspections, tests, etc in it. I am successful as a wife, parent and professionally because I have systems in place to compensate for those moments when my brain goes, "OH! Historical Fact. Must hyper-focus, research, and read everything right now!" and get lost in time.

    I can not stress the importance of self organization and systems to keep yourself on track. For example, EVERYTHING in my home, workshops, garage, and workplace has a home, and must be in it's home. My clothes are put away left to right, dark to light, in color order. Shirts folded and put away so that the ends are up and I can see all of them at a glance. Socks and underwear are separated and put away by use. eg: hiking, dress, wicking, etc. Clothing hung is by sleeve or pant length, short to long. Trousers/jeans are rolled and stacked. Shoes are in boxes, filed by use and color. etc. My make-up, markers, paints, sewing thread, embroidery thread, leather working tools, ammunition, sockets, screw drivers, pliers, wrenches, router bits, nails, screws, wood stain, and etc, is all put away in that fashion. I do EVERYTHING that way because I don't have to think to find it and it keeps me from getting distracted, making a mess or being late.

    My bag has a home, my truck keys go in the chipmunk, my house keys on the anchor, my gun goes in the war room. My phone and watch go on their chargers in the same place, every time. Laptop gets plugged in as soon as I walk in the door. I have similar systems for work. You get the picture.

    I rely heavily on a calendar so I know what is going on when, when things are due and when I have bills to pay, dogs to the vet, my daughter's ungodly amount of extra-curricular activities, doctors appointments, etc. I put in things to remind me of what needs to be done so I am not doing things last minute, eg: hem trousers, order contact lenses, pack for competition, refill RX, and etc.

    If you exercise and work out, I suggest you do it more. Nothing calms your brain down like endorphins in the morning. I know several active duty people with severe ADHD, they are PT fanatics because it helps them regulate. One is on the elliptical, stair machine or rowing machine an hour a day, every day, 352 days a year. The other runs at least 5 if not 10 miles daily.

    There are three kids who are now in college, 2 in ROTC and one finishing his first year at a Service Academy who I taught these methods to years ago. They knew they wanted to go into the military, so they knew they could not take any kind of ADHD medication or have an official diagnosis. They were all very successful in high school once they learned to organize themselves, I had to teach their parents these methods because Mom and Dad needed to communicate with their kid.

    My daughter does not have ADHD, but she grew up with my OCD and militant organization. It made her very successful in Young Marines, Marine Corps JROTC, volunteer work and anything she set herself to because she managed to get far more done because she was organized.
     
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  10. Herman_Snerd

    Herman_Snerd Member

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    @Magna Venari "my truck keys go in the chipmunk" hmm, so that coping mechanism is not very kind to the chipmunk, plus, then you have to find the chipmunk whenever you need to move your truck! :eek::)

    quick joke aside that I hope makes you and others smile, wanted to say this is an excellent, heartfelt and informative post and I thank you for sharing it. Kudos to you for your adaptability and success AND using what has hampered others to drive high performance in your life and house. Much respect to you.
     
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  11. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    Hmm.. after reading your list of coping mechanisms, I am a little uneasy. I thought these were necessary things all disciplined people did.... ;)
     
  12. Magna Venari

    Magna Venari Member

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    My family will tell you I take it overboard. :rofl:

    At one point in time, I found screw drivers in the buffet. I asked why, my husband said so I didn't melt down if he used it and forgot to put it back. :rolleyes: