advice with applying for OTS

ck82

New Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2019
Messages
5
Hi, I'm 37 years old and so glad that the cutting age changed, but I need to do something fast and the right way because I don't have time. I did my first-time AFOQT test in 2015, I didn't know I could only do it twice, so I wasn't prepared and on my second time, I got some food poisoning and could barely finish the test. back then, my recruiter wasn't a big help, she never showed any interest in helping me or giving me information, as a matter of fact, she lost all my paperwork and documents that were translated and certified. Anyways, I was devastated because I also didn't have a lot of time because before the cutting age was 35 and she never told me anything about how the waivers work, etc. I don't have any military background, and I never guessed. Well, long story short is I never give up on my dream to become an officer for the air force, I want to do anything that is on my power to join the OTS, so these are the facts:
I am 37, almost 38 years old, I am an American citizen but born and raised in Brazil, my first language is Portuguese (that's one of the reasons the verbal test was so hard and I failed), I have a Law degree from Brazil, and I did business management here in US, already translated my diploma and did all procedure necessary to send to the Air Force, I just found out there is a way to join the OTS, in my case that I have Law degree, that doesn't require the AFOQT test, what is it? Do I need a waiver? what would be the fastest way to apply?
I believe i have a great curriculum, not sure if it is for the air force, not only my academic background but I also have 15 years in a leadership position, a lot of certifications in business, leadership, criminal law, negotiation, management, etc. I'm a hard worker, dedicated, speaks 3 languages, with great credit, never use any kind of drugs, I do have 3 speeding tickets but is basically the only thing I have negative. I also build / developed 3 companies that I own, that gives me some financial comfort, with that being said a lot of people question me why do I want to join the military and even as an officer I will cut down my paycheck, the reason is simple: I do wanna join because is my dream, there is nothing that i wanna do more than to serve this country that means so much to me and to help others, I met so many Veterans since I moved to USA, I made so many friends, I heard their stories, their sacrifices and I feel that is my time to serve, it is my time to do what they so bravely did for us. That is the legacy I want to leave for my son.
I contact a recruiter, sent over my initial package, I haven't heard from him. I am super anxious because I see it can take a long time and soon i will be turning 39 and my chances will blow, please any advice or suggestions are very welcome.
 

Tbpxece

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
747
I did my first-time AFOQT test in 2015, I didn't know I could only do it twice, so I wasn't prepared and on my second time, I got some food poisoning and could barely finish the test. back then, my recruiter wasn't a big help, she never showed any interest in helping me or giving me information, as a matter of fact, she lost all my paperwork and documents that were translated and certified.
Don't blame your recruiter (an enlisted member) for your personal failures. For someone who wants to be an officer, it's not a good look. I'm not scolding you; I am giving you advice. That attitude will carry no water with military members. You should have prepared for that test and stayed on top of your application.

I suggest you purge that portion of your personal narrative now. As a 37-year old with a law degree and three businesses, you should be quite familiar with the realities of personal failures and successes.

I just found out there is a way to join the OTS, in my case that I have Law degree, that doesn't require the AFOQT test, what is it? Do I need a waiver? what would be the fastest way to apply?
  1. Why do you think having a law degree means you do not need to take the AFOQT?
  2. Yes, you will need a waiver to either (a) get a third test attempt, or (b) waive the AFOQT requirement.
  3. The fastest way to apply is to do what you've done-- contact a recruiter.

I contact a recruiter, sent over my initial package, I haven't heard from him. I am super anxious because I see it can take a long time and soon i will be turning 39 and my chances will blow, please any advice or suggestions are very welcome.
So, you've applied to OTS through a recruiter and are now "super anxious" because you haven't heard back? Understand that December is more-or-less a month-long holiday for DoD. I would not expect to hear anything until the first or second week of January.

If I understand correctly where you are in the process, then there is nothing you can do at this point. If you require a waiver, then your recruiter will contact you to complete it and then send it in to be routed through the applicable approving officials. The inclusion of a waiver in the OTS package typically adds several months to a process that already takes several months.

Your OTS package will either be approved or denied. There is nothing you can do to speed up the process, but you can (and should) check-in with your recruiter at reasonable intervals.

When it comes to your recruiter, não seja pesado-- instead relax and enjoy the holidays. Work on your plan B if you like. Other branches do not require the AFOQT-- it is unique to the USAF and the USSF.
 

ck82

New Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2019
Messages
5
Don't blame your recruiter (an enlisted member) for your personal failures. For someone who wants to be an officer, it's not a good look. I'm not scolding you; I am giving you advice. That attitude will carry no water with military members. You should have prepared for that test and stayed on top of your application.

I suggest you purge that portion of your personal narrative now. As a 37-year old with a law degree and three businesses, you should be quite familiar with the realities of personal failures and successes.


  1. Why do you think having a law degree means you do not need to take the AFOQT?
  2. Yes, you will need a waiver to either (a) get a third test attempt, or (b) waive the AFOQT requirement.
  3. The fastest way to apply is to do what you've done-- contact a recruiter.


So, you've applied to OTS through a recruiter and are now "super anxious" because you haven't heard back? Understand that December is more-or-less a month-long holiday for DoD. I would not expect to hear anything until the first or second week of January.

If I understand correctly where you are in the process, then there is nothing you can do at this point. If you require a waiver, then your recruiter will contact you to complete it and then send it in to be routed through the applicable approving officials. The inclusion of a waiver in the OTS package typically adds several months to a process that already takes several months.

Your OTS package will either be approved or denied. There is nothing you can do to speed up the process, but you can (and should) check-in with your recruiter at reasonable intervals.

When it comes to your recruiter, não seja pesado-- instead relax and enjoy the holidays. Work on your plan B if you like. Other branches do not require the AFOQT-- it is unique to the USAF and the USSF.

hi, thanks for your advice!!
First, I would like to clarify and sorry if it sounds like I was blaming her, I don't blame my recruiter for anything and I totally agree is my failure is not hers on the test, and I should have research and stayed on top of my application. Well, all that I was trying to say is that she wasn't a big help, she didn't guide me to the right direction and, there is a lot of information that she could have told me, or send me as the new recruiter did, AFOQT checklist for success, AF Jobs list, Letter of recommendation, etc . the only thing I got back then before the test was a questionnaire and that I need to do the test first. Please, don't get me wrong, I that I am trying to get is more information, research better this time and see if there is any hope in my case if anybody knows and could guide me on what to do, who to go for better answers, this time I am trying to be better prepared if I do have a chance as some people told me I have.

Also, I don't know if I really do need or no to take the test with law degree, that is what I am wondering I have read couple things that says that is not a requirement, that is a different process, I am wondering if anyone knows about it, have any information or experience that they can share with me.
I know the recruiters are super busy, is not an easy job, it is very stressful that is why I want to be prepared this time, so I can explore all my options, have all paperwork ready to make it easier, I believe this way makes it easier for both of us.
I know December is a busy month, with a lot of holidays, I totally understand.
Thank you very much for answering my post, and i will be working on plane B too.
 

Tbpxece

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2018
Messages
747
Understood.

AFMAN 36-2032 is the original source policy governing officer accessions. If you want the hard facts, look here first.

Quoting from AFMAN 36-2032, I found the following information that may be relevant to you. Emphasis mine.

para. 5.5.1.1
"Qualified applicants for appointment for duty as a judge advocate must meet the
requirements in paragraph 5.4, be a graduate of an accredited law school, and be a member
of the bar of a federal court or of the highest court of a state
.
"

para. 5.4.9.2
"Appointments in professional categories are exempt from AFOQT requirements"

AFI 51-101 sets forth the requirements for Judge Advocate (JAG) program.

I found the following information in this AFI that may be relevant to you. Emphasis mine.

para. 5.2 through 5.2.4
"Individuals interested in becoming a judge advocate must meet the following eligibility
criteria:
...Be a graduate of a law school that is accredited or provisionally accredited by the American Bar Association at the time of graduation; and...Be in an active (or equivalent) status, in good standing, and admitted to practice before
the highest court of a U.S. state, commonwealth or territory, or the District of Columbia..."

In short, if you have a law degree from a law school that was ABA-accredited at the time of your graduation AND you have passed the bar in at least one state/territory/commonwealth/district AND you currently practice law in one of those jurisdictions, then you would possibly be eligible for an appointment in a professional category (i.e. JAG).

A law degree alone is not sufficient.

Without the above qualifications, you would be looking at the regular OTS route and the need for a passing AFOQT score or a waiver. Based on what you have previously posted, I am inclined to think that you are not an active, practicing lawyer with an ABA-accredited law degree. Therefore, you likely would not be eligible for a professional appointment to the JAG.

Further information:

Direct Commissioned Officer Training (formerly known as Commissioned Officer Training) is a specific, shortened route through OTS designed for those with the appropriate requirements who apply for a professional appointment into JAG, the MDG, and/or the Chaplaincy. Read about it here.

Otherwise, you would apply to the normal OTS route, Line Officer Training (formerly known as "Basic Officer Training" or "Total Force Officer Training"). When most people refer to "OTS", they are referring to Line Officer Training. Read about it here.

OTS is always changing. You will only benefit yourself to stay attentive to the OTS website for any pending changes.

Due to these changes, do not be surprised if your recruiter continues to use the legacy terms of "COT", "BOT", or "TFOT" to describe the programs I mentioned above.

Disclaimer:

I am aware that is a lot to process. I am willing to answer further questions or clarify my above statements, but understand that I am not a recruiter and am not affiliated with the Air Force Recruiting Service, so my answers will be limited to referencing the aforementioned AFI's, AFMAN's, and the Air University website.
 

ck82

New Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2019
Messages
5
Understood.

AFMAN 36-2032 is the original source policy governing officer accessions. If you want the hard facts, look here first.

Quoting from AFMAN 36-2032, I found the following information that may be relevant to you. Emphasis mine.

para. 5.5.1.1
"Qualified applicants for appointment for duty as a judge advocate must meet the
requirements in paragraph 5.4, be a graduate of an accredited law school, and be a member
of the bar of a federal court or of the highest court of a state
.
"

para. 5.4.9.2
"Appointments in professional categories are exempt from AFOQT requirements"

AFI 51-101 sets forth the requirements for Judge Advocate (JAG) program.

I found the following information in this AFI that may be relevant to you. Emphasis mine.

para. 5.2 through 5.2.4
"Individuals interested in becoming a judge advocate must meet the following eligibility
criteria:
...Be a graduate of a law school that is accredited or provisionally accredited by the American Bar Association at the time of graduation; and...Be in an active (or equivalent) status, in good standing, and admitted to practice before
the highest court of a U.S. state, commonwealth or territory, or the District of Columbia..."

In short, if you have a law degree from a law school that was ABA-accredited at the time of your graduation AND you have passed the bar in at least one state/territory/commonwealth/district AND you currently practice law in one of those jurisdictions, then you would possibly be eligible for an appointment in a professional category (i.e. JAG).

A law degree alone is not sufficient.

Without the above qualifications, you would be looking at the regular OTS route and the need for a passing AFOQT score or a waiver. Based on what you have previously posted, I am inclined to think that you are not an active, practicing lawyer with an ABA-accredited law degree. Therefore, you likely would not be eligible for a professional appointment to the JAG.

Further information:

Direct Commissioned Officer Training (formerly known as Commissioned Officer Training) is a specific, shortened route through OTS designed for those with the appropriate requirements who apply for a professional appointment into JAG, the MDG, and/or the Chaplaincy. Read about it here.

Otherwise, you would apply to the normal OTS route, Line Officer Training (formerly known as "Basic Officer Training" or "Total Force Officer Training"). When most people refer to "OTS", they are referring to Line Officer Training. Read about it here.

OTS is always changing. You will only benefit yourself to stay attentive to the OTS website for any pending changes.

Due to these changes, do not be surprised if your recruiter continues to use the legacy terms of "COT", "BOT", or "TFOT" to describe the programs I mentioned above.

Disclaimer:

I am aware that is a lot to process. I am willing to answer further questions or clarify my above statements, but understand that I am not a recruiter and am not affiliated with the Air Force Recruiting Service, so my answers will be limited to referencing the aforementioned AFI's, AFMAN's, and the Air University website.
Thank you very much, all this information it will help me a lot!!
 
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