AFROTC and ADD/ADHD waiver?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by jtmisc, Mar 30, 2017.

  1. jtmisc

    jtmisc New Member

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    Good evening!

    I'm in the process of joining the AFROTC while I work on my masters, and I'm curious about the ADD/ADHD medical requirements..I was diagnosed with ADD/ADHD in the 3rd grade by the third psychiatrist my mother took me to (very popular period for this diagnosis and the previous two doctors said I exhibited no signs of ADD/ADHD, I was just a normal 9 year old) and have been given prescription medication on and off since then. Now, this was not voluntary for me to do. The prescriptions I was given as an adult were "precautionary", and I stopped taking them in college (graduated with finance degree and a 3.23 GPA in 2014)

    For the past 4 years I have not been on any medication because I have had no issues. I went to my old family MD in February for antibiotics, and he convinced me into trying a new ADD medication based on my medical history as a child (vyvanse). I took the medication for 2 days and have not touched it since. I told my doctor there were no changes and we both agreed that I most likely don't have ADD/ADHD. I have never been diagnosed with adult ADD/ADHD. I even still have the bottle with the medication as proof that I've only taken 2 pills. Every situation is a case by case basis, but in the two year program I'm going to be a POC in August or September of this year. Would a two day use really affect my chances of an ADD/ADHD waiver? Would getting a written redaction of diagnosis by my doctor help my chances?

    Any help would be appreciated. I'd hate to be disqualified for my dream job of being an Air Force Officer because of a "trendy medical diagnosis period" when I was a kid. I'm not going for a flying position if that helps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2017
  2. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    Here is the DoD standard for ADHD:

    a. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (314) UNLESS the following criteria are met:
    (1) The applicant has not required an Individualized Education Program or work accommodations since the age of 14.
    (2) There is no history of comorbid mental disorders.
    (3) The applicant has never taken more than a single daily dosage of medication or has not been prescribed medication for this condition for more than 24 cumulative months after the age of 14.
    (4) During periods off of medication after the age of 14, the applicant has been able to maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average without accommodations.
    (5) Documentation from the applicant’s prescribing provider that continued medication is not required for acceptable occupational or work performance.
    (6) Applicant is required to enter service and pass Service-specific training periods with no prescribed medication for ADHD

    It has been reported that even though an applicant met the exception criteria they were still DQ by DoDMERB. DoDMERB tends to DQ to allow the commissioning source to review the medical file and make a decision via the waiver process. ADHD waivers are granted. Obviously completing college and starting a masters program without medication or accommodation will be a strong positive. When you complete your medical history form try the best you can to address each of the exception criteria to give the DoDMERB reviewer an easy road map to access your ADHD. You may also want to get documentation from your physician to support your case.
     
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  3. jtmisc

    jtmisc New Member

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    Thank you for the reply, I've also spent 3 years in the civilian sector as a financial and strategy analyst with no special accommodations or medication. Would quoting my successful work experience do anything for my package?
     
  4. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    I would add that information on your medical history form as part of the explanation of your ADHD. The most credible information in DoDMERB's eyes is the opinions of medical professionals and more specifically your physician. If and when you get to the remedial stage you may want to have your success in the private sector imbedded into a medical report prepared by your doctor supporting their medical opinion and diagnosis.
     
  5. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    It might be worthwhile to contact DoDMERB consultants and speak with CAPT/Dr. Glen Merchant, a former DoDMERB Director and Naval Physician. Several forum members have have found his guidance helpful. YMMV.

    He could possibly advise you on precise and truthful wording regarding your explanation.

    Also a visit with a physician who has a military background might also accomplish the same thing.

    Here is a link to Dr Merchant. He us retired and travels a bit so he might not respond immediately.

    http://www.dodmerbconsultants.com

    Good luck!
     
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  6. jtmisc

    jtmisc New Member

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    Thanks everyone, I spoke with my doctor this morning and he agreed to make a memo stating that I do not have adult ADD/ADHD, and that I am fully capable of performing any necessary functions without special accommodations or medications.

    I also spoke to my father this morning, and he told me when I went to get tested at Scottish Rite they were informed that they do not test ADD/ADHD, only prescribe medication for it. He told me that I've never been tested for the disorder.
     
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  7. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G. 5-Year Member

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    Keep in mind, one doesn't need to be tested to be diagnosed or treated for ADHD. Symptoms can be observed and criteria can be met without a test. If someone goes to the doctor with a sore throat, fever, runny nose, and a cough; do I need to run labs to see if they have a cold? The same logic applies for ADHD in most cases. Primary care providers aren't trained to TEST for ADHD, but they know the criteria. Testing is a result of being on the fence about a diagnosis or one needs to confirm.

    I'm saying all this to say, just because you weren't tested for ADHD doesn't mean you weren't diagnosed or treated for ADHD.
     
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  8. jtmisc

    jtmisc New Member

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    I completely understand, and thank you for the insight. It's just frustrating to be diagnosed with something because it was "trendy" at the time to put kids on Ritalin. I've been on the deans list for 2 semesters with no medications or special accommodations, and would hate for this to be the one thing that holds me back.
     
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