Blood Pinning

Discussion in 'OTS/OCS/PLC' started by Max S., Jul 13, 2019.

  1. Max S.

    Max S. New Member

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    I would like to be an Infantry Officer or Aviation Officer in the marines but one thing I’m still confused about is blood pinning. Does it still happen and if it does can I opt out after the official ceremony?
     
  2. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    You won’t be blood pinned. Usually your rank is pinned on by those you select. If you earn wings they won’t do that at flight school. Not something to worry about.
     
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  3. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt 5-Year Member

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    @Max S. - pinning and blood stripes are not something you should be concerned with.

    Back in the 80's, it was quite common amongst the enlisted men in my infantry company. It was done out of the sight of the Officers and unless someone was injured enough to seek a light duty chit, we looked the other way. It was tradition.

    Today, there are severe actions taken on leaders and those who commit hazing. There has been plenty of bad press when these incidents become public and the hammer comes down on the chain-of-command when it does. I am sure it happens from time to time but it is not pervasive and is dealt with severely when it does. Based on my conversations with several of today's Officers, it just isn't done much anymore. That is a good thing.
     
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  4. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator 10-Year Member

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    It used to happen at Benning at the completion of jump school, at least when I went there. However...several years later, one newly winged jumper showed up in the ER...the wings had been "blood pinned" so hard the tines were buried in his collarbone...bad stuff.

    Sometime after that; he wasn't the first to have "issues", the army came out with rules like USMCGrunt described...woe unto the leadership that allowed this as it was considered "hazing" and a criminal act, etc...

    Like USMCGrunt said, when I ask friends today they say it doesn't happen.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
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  5. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Apparently these days "breaking in" an armored cavalry Stetson still involves filling it with a large amount of alcohol.
     
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  6. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator 10-Year Member

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    Well that's just a military exercise in logistical distribution and conservation of resources...good training.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
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  7. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    The alcohol is just the mixer for all the other stuff they throw in there, son had to have his cleaned twice just to get the smell out. Those Air Cav Kiowa Cowboys really got serious.
     
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  8. Day-Tripper

    Day-Tripper 5-Year Member

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    I can't imagine officers every behaving so uncivilized (read with sarcasm).

    Enlisted men? Not so much.

    Seriously, while my active duty service was more than 30 years ago, I never saw anything that qualified as "hazing" at all. Hard training, to be sure. Blanket parties existed in Boot Camp, of course. Pinning ceremonies were good natured and rarely more than some hard punches in the arm followed by copious amounts of alcohol. Nobody died. Nobody was hospitalized. Comradeship was amplified. Welcome to the Brotherhood!

    How do you train men to take a bullet in the stomach, drag a worse-wounded buddy to safety and return fire at the enemy (at the same time) if they can't take a punch?

    This ain't diversity training in corporate Manhattan.

    On the other hand, I'll note that Drill Instructors can no longer hit recruits and that is a good thing. Physical abuse is way down & physical training is way up. No more smoke breaks for recruits.
     
  9. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    "No more smoke breaks for recruits."

    When I joined the CG....back when the main propulsion was Oars...I can remember the first time the Chief yelled out "10 Minute smoke break!!" about half went outside to the smoking can, the rest of us had to stay and continue cleaning something or another. The next time he yelled Smoke Break" everyone went out. There was a lot of coughing and gagging going on but Hey, we were getting a 10 minute break!
     
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  10. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    That was when Noah was on his first cruise, right?
     
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  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    .....and as much as we tried, we just couldn't get those stupid Unicorns on to the boat.