Boxing at USCGA

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by Jeepman, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. Jeepman

    Jeepman Member

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    Does anyone know if boxing is coming back to USCGA next year?
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006 10-Year Member

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    It left? I thought they had a successful program.
     
  3. rjb

    rjb 5-Year Member

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    No longer listed on USCGA website
     
  4. LurkingQuietly

    LurkingQuietly Member

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  5. Jeepman

    Jeepman Member

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    So much for combat readiness if boxing has indeed gone away for good. I am holding out hope for next year.
     
  6. rjb

    rjb 5-Year Member

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  7. Korab

    Korab Member

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  8. rjb

    rjb 5-Year Member

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    This article was cited as it related to service academies. There are many medical studies available regarding concussion management and head trauma as it relates to boxing.

    Concussions received while at academy can lead to not being medically cleared to commission. A deadly blow to a young man / woman that can't fulfill their dream to serve as a military officer.
     
  9. Korab

    Korab Member

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    Yes, there is medical literature that will support almost anything, including little Johnny being diagnosed with a concussion every time he has a headache, but I doubt there is any literature as it specifically relates to a boxing class with limited punch counts at the academies. Comparing what the academies do to any any studies involving actual boxers is like comparing apples and elephants.

    If little Johnny can't go a couple rounds in the ring without suffering career ending brain damage, maybe he wasn't meant to be there in the first place. The academy isn't there to fulfill little Johnny's (or his parents') dream, it's there to forge leaders of soldiers. There will be casualties along the way. Somehow, we seem to have forgotten that.
     
  10. rjb

    rjb 5-Year Member

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    The concussion numbers cited were from the service academies and not the boxing industry.
     
  11. Korab

    Korab Member

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    The current diagnosis of concussions is nonsense. Doctors diagnose everyone with even a headache as having a concussion. The data is useless. You cant compare it to previous data because the standards for diagnosis have changed considerably.

    The most useful information in that article is 1.) boxing isn't helpful in actual hand to hand combat (duh), and 2) What boxing is good for is getting people over their fear of a physical confrontation, since most kids today have never been in a scrap.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  12. rjb

    rjb 5-Year Member

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  13. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator 10-Year Member

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    Korab,

    I'm writing this not as a moderator, but as an ALO, teacher, formerly licensed (national register) critical care paramedic, and the son of both a physician and trauma nurse. That said only to say I have more than the layman's knowledge of concussion and other injuries. You state that "...the current diagnosis of concussions is nonsense." Would you please cite your source for this? I mean peer reviewed research, not opinion. I can easily find you the medical descriptions of the symptoms of brain injury: concussion and others. I work in a high school and I see how our concussion protocols work for student-athletes. They follow the AMA guidelines (and we have the Mayo Clinic close by as well as the Barrow Neurological Institute, we use their protocols too) to care for our student-athletes when they have any head trauma.

    While I might agree with you that SOME doctors are hair-triggered today to say "probable mild concussion" with no solid traumatic symptoms, I think I'd rather have that given the long-term complications that can come from a true TBI, so that the individual might receive treatment.

    Your last comment: "If little Johnny can't go a couple rounds in the ring without suffering career ending brain damage, maybe he wasn't meant to be there in the first place. The academy isn't there to fulfill little Johnny's (or his parents') dream, it's there to forge leaders of soldiers. There will be casualties along the way. Somehow, we seem to have forgotten that" comes across as a petty non-sequiter. The SA's exist to train career officers of their respective services, not pugilistic champions. We don't seek the best and the brightest of american youth to come to the SA only to use them as punching bags to "weed out the weak." Those days died a century ago, thankfully. We aren't looking for "casualties along the way" as a score-card of how good or bad our training of future officers is.

    I understand what you're trying to say, I just think you could say it better and not sound condescending to others.

    Steve
     
  14. Korab

    Korab Member

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    There's a huge difference between two neophytes boxing a few rounds with rules and punch counts and stepping into the ring with a golden gloves boxer where apparently no one followed the rules. The first I would encourage. The second is criminal negligence. I hope the USCGA cadet has a good lawyer.
     
  15. LurkingQuietly

    LurkingQuietly Member

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    I doubt the CGA's reason for Boxing being cut was for prevention of head injuries. Although it was probably a "Risk vs Return" decision, since it was only a club sport. If anyone was really worried about TBI, they'd get rid of Football, Soccer, Ice Hockey, LaCrosse and Rugby. And we don't have "Boxing Moms" like we have "Soccer Moms". If we had the "MAFIA" (Mother's Against Football in America), you could kiss that sport goodbye. (I better trademark that term).
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
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  16. Korab

    Korab Member

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    There isn't any peer reviewed research on every ER Dr diagnosing a concussion for every kid who comes in after a hit to the head. Schools and coaches are scared of litigation so any time a kid hits his head they require an ER visit. ER's and Dr's are equally scared of litigation, so they say possible mild concussion and keep the kid out of everything for two weeks, regardless. Spend some time around contact sports like I have for the the last decade and you will know this is true. The worst part is, when someone sustains a real TBI, most medical professionals are ill equipped to understand it or treat it. Many TBI/concussion clinics, especially those in rural areas, are close to useless for treatment of real TBI's.

    The medical community is just scratching the surface of understanding concussions and TBI's, and the long term and/or cumulative effect of same. CTE is the new buzz word, which those who fear and abhor contact and violence use to further their cause. For every Junior Seau in the world, there are thousands of people who played contact sports, took a 1000 blows to the head, and suffered no long term consequences. Because many advancing this cause are advocates, not researchers, no one wants to look at or acknowledge the role of genetics and physiology as the primary cause of the outcome.

    As to your last paragraph, you either didn't understand what I was saying or are intentionally obfuscating what I said. Success in the ring isn't what's important - it's having the courage and fortitude to be willing to step in even though you might get knocked on your ***. Maybe you don't think that's an important quality for a leader, but I would hope that's a minority opinion. The "best and brightest" don't always make great leaders. If you were to poll recent and current cadets at USCGA, you would find that there is concern within the Academy that some of the cadets don't have the "people skills" necessary to be an effective leader. It takes a person worthy of respect to be an effective leader, and it takes more than high SAT scores and 200 hours of community service to earn that respect. The Academy recognizes this problem as well, which is why they now require admission interviews. Contrary to your claim, it appears there does need to be some weeding out of the weak.
     
  17. sanman

    sanman Member

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    I have absolutely no feelings either way about boxing. However I am not sure that having the willingness to step into the ring even though you may get the snot knocked out of you is any indication of your ability to lead, or that any unwillingness of stepping into the ring makes you weak. As you say the Academy is looking for well rounded individuals, they have a holistic approach to identifying cadets. I would say that the removal of a single activity is unlikely to have any impact on the academy's success in creating leaders
     
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  18. Jeepman

    Jeepman Member

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    Lots of interesting replies here, for sure. Unfortunately, a lot of them echo society's current obsession with outliers and outlying probabilities. If the service academies are producing leaders for the defense of our country and what it (is supposed to) stands for, it would stand to reason that being able to physically defend oneself in an assault situation via hand-to-hand combat would be important, and that such training should be SOP for any of the service academies. That said, I certainly think there should be a boxing club and perhaps a martial arts club for the cadets to participate in. Like me, both of my sons wrestled varsity in high school and took some boxing lessons along the way and I am thankful they have that lifelong skill to use in a worse case scenario. Semper Paratus, right? Just my two cents of logic.....
     
  19. ekb1398

    ekb1398 Member

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    This does exist outside of the boxing club. All cadets are required to take two personal defense classes, and a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu club exists as well - plus varsity wrestling. There may be others that exist as well that I'm unaware of.

    From what I've heard on campus, the boxing club was ended due to safety concerns with the way the program was being run, but that is from the ever thriving and often questionable rumor mill.
     
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