Chances of Peanut Allergy DQ

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by jbcbc, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. jbcbc

    jbcbc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm an AS200 in AFROTC. I have my DoDMERB appointments coming up in a few weeks. I have a minor allergy to peanuts. I can eat small amounts of them, all that happens is when I have too much I get a rash on my arm. I'm constantly exposed to them at home, cross contamination on a daily basis, and even have eaten those small snickers on halloween while being totally fine. Never used, had, carried an Epi-Pen. Totally not anaphylactic. My doc says he's willing to write a letter to bring to my appointment saying i'm fit for service and it will not interfere with my duties. What are the chances they'll DQ me and what are the chances I could get a waiver?

    I've seen a lot of people on here with severe peanut allergies get DQ and waiver denied, but no one who has such a minor allergy like myself.
     
  2. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,103
    Likes Received:
    965
    First off...unless your doc is Military and familiar with the regulations he/she shouldn’t be writing a letter saying you are fit for service. He can provide a medical diagnosis that states the medical condition and any limitations you have. Sounds like you will likely be qualified or medically DQ’d and granted a waiver. I recommend when you go for your physical and they ask about your allergy you explain it, just like you did on your post here. Hopefully the examiner does a good job of conveying your condition. DODMERB is still probably going to ask you to fill out an allergy questionnaire. At that time you may want to send them the letter from your doc.
     
    AROTC-dad likes this.
  3. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    1,498
    jbcbc -- It is good advice from clarksonarmy for your doctor (unless he is current or prior military) to not declare anything about your fitness for service, HOWEVER, it is a very good idea in my opinion for you to have your doctor write a letter describing your condition and for you to talk with him about doing a "nut challenge" for you if necessary.

    Our experience is that Army ROTC is "reasonable" with food allergies; but USAFA and AFROTC are totally unreasonable -- you have to prove you either never had, or out grew the allergy in order to get a "waiver" (. . . why you need a waiver for a condition you don't have is a discussion for another day, but I digress . . .)

    Do exactly what clarksonarmy said above during your DoDMERB exam. Be honest with the doctor that examines you. Hopefully all goes well, but if after the exam you find out that DoDMERB declares you DQ, it is likely AFROTC will deny you a medical waiver. Once they do, tell them you want to appeal. They will most likely offer you the opportunity to take a supervised nut challenge with your allergist at your own expense. If you have any reaction at all, including hives/rash, they will likely deny you the medical waiver. This is our experience.

    AROTC however has given waivers for nut allergies in the past. You might talk to your AF and Army ROTC cadre at some point and consider switching to AROTC if AFROTC ends up denying you the medical waiver.

    Sincere best wishes and thank you for your willingness to serve.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
    AROTC-dad likes this.
  4. jbcbc

    jbcbc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    He's a retired Air Force doctor. Thank you for your guidance and suggestions. Being that he's a retired military doctor, would it be best to have him write a letter and bring it with me to the appointment or to wait for a waiver and submit it with the waiver? Thanks again for your help
     
  5. jbcbc

    jbcbc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks a lot for the help, it's more valuable than you'd think. I'm gonna take both of your suggestions and i guess at the end of the day, all i can do is be honest, do my best to describe my allergy, and hope for the best.
     
  6. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    1,498
    The doc that examines you won't be the one that decides if you are "Q" or "DQ". That will be the docs back at DoDMERB in Colorado Springs. They will decide based on the exam and the forms you filled out. Probably best to have it ready to submit to DoDMERB if, and as soon as, they DQ you. The letter from your doc will probably not prevent a DQ determination but may help you get the waiver from either AFROTC or AROTC.

    If you get a DQ, feel to send me a PM if you'd like to discuss more.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
  7. sheriff3

    sheriff3 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    1,207
    Likes Received:
    580
    OP, in your first post there is no mention of a diagnosis of a peanut allergy by an MD. If you have never been diagnosed with a peanut allergy by an MD/DO I would argue you do not have one. A food sensitivity is different than an allergy. I do not recall the questionnaire but I believe it asks if one has been diagnosed. Be truthful but do not open a door that can remain shut unnecessarily. If you want a picture of how it worked for my DS look In my posts from about 4 years ago. He went through the food allergy DQ. Best of luck.