college reapplicants

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by wannabeplebe, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. wannabeplebe

    wannabeplebe Member

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    College reapplicants who have been offered an appointment (or anyone who has any insight into this):

    I know that (Varsity) sports are a pretty important part of a high schoolers application, but do sports in college hold as much weight? I know that I probably won't be a D1 athlete in college, but I was wondering how important that is since playing sports in college seems to be a little different than high school? (The phrasing of this question is a little weird but hopefully you get the jist.)

    Additionally, how important is NROTC in college?

    Basically, I'm wondering what you did, if anything, differently as a college reapplicant?
     
  2. hockeygirl

    hockeygirl Member

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    To add on to wannabeplebe's question, is being in NROTC and playing a D2 or D3 sport a feat that can be accomplished?
     
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  3. Firehawk1

    Firehawk1 Member

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    I am sure there are successful re-applicants that did not play a collegiate sport. Also, NROTC is not offered at all schools as in my DS case and he was a successful re-applicant. His work load in class, taking challenging classes and maintaining a high GPA was key. Do that, participate in a club sport (if nothing else), be involved in any type of leadership organization and you will be very competitive. Best wishes.
     
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  4. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    Participating in college sports (including D1) sports and NROTC is possible, but it is a time management challenge. It would be important for the NROTC battalion and the coach to work together, because conflicts will happen.
     
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  5. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Most important thing is grades. There isn't a need to be a D1 athlete or do ROTC. It's the things that goes on there that helps build a resume for a re-applicant. If you don't do a sport or ROTC then ensure you are at least playing an intramural, getting involved with an ECA and community service.
     
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  6. ncbill

    ncbill 5-Year Member

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    My oldest started college (no NROTC) on an Army ROTC 4-year scholarship, re-applied to USMA & USNA, and was accepted to both.

    Though his first choice was always USNA.

    He didn't play a varsity sport at college that year, just participated on an intramural team.
     
  7. anne99

    anne99 Member

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    My DS is an appointed re-applicant. He did not do any sport or extra-curricular in his freshman year at college. He did Corps of Cadets and NROTC though. Those and academics took every minute of the day, no time for anything else.
     
  8. mrdolphin

    mrdolphin Member

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    My university did not offer NROTC, only AFROTC and AROTC. I considered joining one of the offered ROTC programs but opted against it because USNA was my only goal and I didn't want to be misleading as to where my interests lied. I did not participate in an intermural or varsity sport, as neither seemed to be crucial to being a successful reapplicant. Instead, for PT, I ran before class every morning and lifted weights every night. You should take 18 credits (6 classes) with Chemistry, Calculus (Calc 1, not "business calculus" or whatever your university may call their easier course), and English. Especially in Calculus and English, sit in the front row and visit office hours every week. This should set you up for an outstanding LOR from both professors. Bonus points for joining some sort of academic extra cirricular and earning a leadership position.