Disqualified for Psoriasis

Hello,

Things have been quite bleak lately. Earlier this month my USMA Regional Coordinator called me to let me know that the USMA will not be doing any waivers for Psoriasis. I do not know what this means. Regardless, I had my dermatologist write a letter about the condition of my psoriasis (extremely mild, less than 1% of my body, never flares up, etc.) and I am sending the letter to my coordinator and dodmerb (Side note: can someone tell me the best way to go about that?)

Unfortunately, my application status says disqualified, and on dodmerb tricare it has been written that usma has denied the request for a waiver.

Is there anything left to do? It all seems so pitiful that I was denied for something that was on the bottom of my list of worries, considering it has so little to do with my health and ability to serve in the military.
 
Over the phone, my regional coordinator stated that very rarely (1 in 9 or 1 in 10) do candidates get past this issue. Can I have some clarification on everything? I am very lost right now, emotionally and mentally.
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
I'm pretty sure there are only so many waivers allowed for various conditions each year. Evidently yours is not one they are going to pursue this year. I'm not even certain that they ever pursue waivers for psoriasis, but I'll take your regional coordinators word for it. Since they apparently didn't do a remedial I don't think your doctor's letter will do any good, bt I suppose it doesn't hurt to try.

Keep in mind that this is not personal. OK, your psoriasis doesn't flare up here. What about in the tropics and/or jungle? What about in the arctic or desert? Are you on medication and will it be available in every combat zone? Will they be able to get it to you on the front lines? The military has to consider these things and take a guess as to whether you might become a burden to your buddies/unit. It's the mission that counts, not you. I know this is heartbreaking, but I also hope you're successful in plan B.
 
What does that mean, "pursue this year"? I don't understand why they pick and choose conditions to allow waivers for. Would that mean I could try again next year and they might waive my condition?

I have been to India and experienced hot temperatures, and where I live it can get quite cold sometimes. My psoriasis has never been an issue. Even if it does "flare up", that can't prevent me from serving or fighting in a combat zone. I don't need medication for my psoriasis. I know that the military would rather be safe than sorry, I suppose. There's just no way I can see psoriasis interfering in any aspect of my performance.
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
What does that mean, "pursue this year"? I don't understand why they pick and choose conditions to allow waivers for. Would that mean I could try again next year and they might waive my condition?

I have been to India and experienced hot temperatures, and where I live it can get quite cold sometimes. My psoriasis has never been an issue. Even if it does "flare up", that can't prevent me from serving or fighting in a combat zone. I don't need medication for my psoriasis. I know that the military would rather be safe than sorry, I suppose. There's just no way I can see psoriasis interfering in any aspect of my performance.
1. I'm not the guy you have to convince...
2. I suppose, if your regional coordinator is correct, that it's always possible but it still sounds like any chances would be quite low. Keep in mind I am no expert on this topic but only have a general sense of it. Ask your regional coordinator if reapplying makes any sense whatsoever.
 

USMA 1994

Member
I am also not the waiver expert but after going through the process with my DD over the last two years there are many variables. I think the biggest impact is how bad the academy wants you. If you are very competitive on your slate, then they will most likely request the process. That still does not mean that they will approve it but it gives you a good idea if they want you. If you are not at the top, they will not even start the process. I can tell you last year that USMA started and approved a waiver for cataracts in less than a week, USAFA didn't even request the process and Cadet Command took over a year to approve.

I agree that you need to have a discussion with your RC and ask those hard questions. "If my application was stronger, would the academy had requested a waiver?" "Would I be more competitive next year after a semester of college?" "Should I apply again next year?"

He is the person in the best position to answer those things.

If serving as an officer in the Army is your goal, then look at ROTC as well. The college experience may be different but after you get to your unit, your commissioning source means little.
 
I was also disqualified for this at USMA, but haven't received any information on the status of my waiver yet. You said that your RC states that USMA will not be doing any waivers for psoriasis. Is this correct? do I now have no chance at receiving a waiver?
 

USMA 1994

Member
@Navybrat98 The only person that knows the real answer to that is your RC. Same advice as I had to the OP. You need to have the conversation with the RC and he will tell you for sure. There are also some suggested questions to help with that conversation
 
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